Jump to content


Why haven't you registered yet?

Registration is quick, easy and completely FREE! Click the Create Account button located at the top-right to sign-up and receive additional benefits that existing members are already receiving!

Photo
- - - - -

"Old South" states and "New South" states


This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
104 replies to this topic

#101 Spatula

Spatula

    Whistle-Stop

  • Members+
  • PipPipPip
  • 324 posts

Posted 15 November 2008 - 03:55 PM

I think the democrats are looking at Georgia and Texas as states that are not as reliably Republican as they used to be.

Republicans in Texas have got to be scared. The latino population in the state is massive. If they started turning out for elections more than 20%, they could flip the state in presidential elections. I'm not exaggerating at all here. White Republicans are at a massive demographic disadvantage in these two states. Turnout is the only thing keeping them in control.

By appealing to disaffected urban liberals in the major cities in NC and VA, and disadvantaged minorities in the rural counties, the dems flipped these states. This strategy will be very successful for them if they stick with it. Especially if they try to distance themselves from the Republicans' anti-immigration stance.

 

#102 monsoon

monsoon

    Gigalopolis

  • Members+
  • 19,737 posts

Posted 15 November 2008 - 04:39 PM

...... But remember that Clinton also turned some Southern states blue, including Arkansas (obviously), Louisiana, and Georgia.

.....

But this happened because there was a very strong candidate in Ross Perot who got almost 20% of the vote when Clinton won those states. It's believed that most of these votes would have gone to Bush Sr. if Perot had not run.

#103 CorgiMatt

CorgiMatt

    Town

  • Members+
  • 3,276 posts

Posted 15 November 2008 - 05:48 PM

Attached is a map of counties/areas of the US that voted more GOP this time than in 2004. Clearly the Carolinas and Virginia trended more Dem while the interior deep South trended more GOP. Could it be that even South Carolina is not as "Old South" as it has a reputation of being?

http://www.nytimes.c...TION_RECAP.html

#104 krazeeboi

krazeeboi

    Gigalopolis

  • Moderators
  • 16,651 posts

Posted 15 November 2008 - 08:32 PM

But this happened because there was a very strong candidate in Ross Perot who got almost 20% of the vote when Clinton won those states. It's believed that most of these votes would have gone to Bush Sr. if Perot had not run.

Point well taken. But I believe Clinton would have still won Arkansas and possibly narrowly won Louisiana even if Perot didn't run.

#105 Spartan

Spartan

    Gigalopolis

  • Global Moderators
  • 17,178 posts

Posted 03 February 2009 - 06:39 PM

Attached is a map of counties/areas of the US that voted more GOP this time than in 2004. Clearly the Carolinas and Virginia trended more Dem while the interior deep South trended more GOP. Could it be that even South Carolina is not as "Old South" as it has a reputation of being?

http://www.nytimes.c...TION_RECAP.html


Thats a great map. People who have moved into NC are eager to not have it labeled as the South, but NC is not that different. NC will always be a Southern state. Besides it will take several more elections before a true trend can be determined. This election showed a large national shift to the left, and NC is just caught up in that wave.