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  1. 1. Anything that doesn't hide most of the buildings behind one another...and also shows all of the skyline. 2. Anything that is not the exact same shot every time...as if that's the only option.
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  2. Just some before and after photos of the view of uptown and the blue line from 11th street. Definitely a big difference!
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  4. At the very least I look forward to its practical application. It's obviously being built to form some sort of sentinel guard system, using the power of the sun and those stupid glass focal devices that sit on Tryon in order to alleviate traffic on 277:
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  5. I was downtown this morning with some time on my hands, so I decided to stop by the courthouse and pull the case file for Second Avenue Partners v. Belle Meade Investments, which is pending in Davidson County Chancery Court. For those interested, the filings are public record and can be requested at the clerk’s office. The case number is 16-0775-I. Since I’m pretty sure most of you would prefer to avoid reading through pages and pages of pleadings, motions, and other filings, I thought I’d give you a somewhat brief summary: The facts are fairly straightforward. Second Avenue Partners (the "Buyer") is the plaintiff, and Belle Meade Investments (the "Seller") is the defendant. The original purchase agreement executed between the parties provided that closing would take place in February 2016. The agreement also gave the Buyer an option to delay closing by providing an additional earnest money deposit that would be applied to the final purchase price. After being delayed twice, closing was set to take place on June 28. On the morning of June 28, a representative of the Buyer contacted the Seller to ask about delaying the closing once more until sometime in August. This additional delay would allow the Buyer to comply with some unspecified requirements of the lender. The Buyer alleges that the Seller agreed to this extension, but there was nothing in the record evincing this claim. On July 1, the Seller notified the Buyer by email of its intention to cancel the sale. This communication, however, did not comply with the notice provisions of the purchase agreement, which provided that all communications must be transmitted via mail. On July 7, the Seller sent a letter to the Buyer notifying the Buyer that it was cancelling the transaction. On July 19, the Buyer filed suit against the Seller in Chancery Court. The Buyer alleges that the Seller failed to deposit the closing documents with the escrow agent pursuant to the terms of the agreement, and that after the closing date, the Seller attempted to wrongfully repudiate the contract. The Seller has filed a counterclaim alleging that termination of the contract was valid and that it is entitled to the $106,000 earnest money deposit that is currently being held in escrow. The parties have raised several arguments, but the crux of the dispute relates to the interaction between two provisions of the purchase agreement. The first important provision is the so-called "time is of the essence" clause. For many types of contracts (e.g., construction, real estate sales, loans, etc.) courts will often view minor deviations from a contract's schedule as being too insignificant to warrant damages or termination of the contract. Thus, where timing is crucial to a deal, lawyers may include a "time is of the essence" provision, making timeliness with respect to the parties' obligations essential. The agreement between the parties here contained such a provision. The Seller believes that the Buyer's request to extend the closing shows that it was unable or unwilling to consummate the transaction by the closing date of June 28. Accordingly, the Buyer did not comply with the agreement's schedule and was in breach of the contract. The Seller was thus entitled to terminate the agreement. The second key provision of the purchase agreement relates to notice and cure. Typically in a large transaction like this one, a party will not be entitled to immediately terminate the transaction upon breach by the other party. The agreement at hand required that, before terminating the contract, the party seeking termination must provide notice to the other party. This notice must specifically describe the nature of the breach and provide the other party with an additional 10 days to cure the breach. Only upon the completion of the 10-day cure period could the transaction be cancelled. The Buyer's argument is that, even if it failed to meet its obligations by the closing date, it had the right to reasonably rely on the 10-day cure period provided in the agreement. Since the Seller did not provide the Buyer with time to cure, which was a condition precedent to termination, the termination was not effective. There seems to be very little Tennessee case law cited by the parties that is directly on point, so it is hard to say who has superior legal arguments. I won't bore you with my personal prognosis regarding the case, but I will point out a couple things that I thought were notable. First, the Buyer is not seeking money as damages. As a general rule, the default remedy for breach of a sales contract is monetary damages. Take for example a sales contract for the purchase of a commodity good. If the seller breaches, the buyer will have to mitigate its losses by buying substitute goods from another seller. If the buyer is required to pay more to "cover," then it will be able to recover the difference from the seller, but courts will not generally require the seller to perform the contract. That being said, there are circumstances where a party can sue for "specific performance." This equitable remedy is often available in land transactions, based upon the theory that land is unique and no other legal remedy will put the non-breaching party in the same position as if the contract been performed. Here, the only relief sought by the Buyer is that the Court declare that the contract remains in effect, set a closing date for the transaction, and compel the Seller to convey the property according to the original contract terms. The Buyer avers that it stands ready and willing to close the transaction and that it has the full amount of the purchase price secured. As of now, there is no indication that the Buyer is not fully intent on purchasing the property. Second, throughout its filings, the Buyer repeatedly stresses the significance of this project-- the scale and value of the development, the 5 star hotel, the additional parking for the benefit SoBro and Ascend, increased property taxes, the impact on the skyline, etc. Though theoretically, these sorts of external considerations should have no bearing on a court's legal analysis, it would be naive to ignore the role they play. Judges are only human and are not ignorant of these sorts of factors. Finally, judges rarely look favorably upon parties who try to play "gotcha" in cases like this one. It appears from the deal timeline that initially both the Buyer and Seller were perfectly intent on having the sale completed and were willing to cooperate with one another to facilitate its completion. Now, however, the Seller is seeking to receive the $106,000 deposit and cancel the transaction so it presumably can try to receive more money for the property down the road. In other words, the Buyer is only trying to receive the benefit of its original bargain, whereas the Seller is looking to receive a windfall. I don't want to insinuate that the Seller is acting in bad faith, only that the "equities of the case" seem to tilt in the Buyer's favor. As for the case timeline and how it might progress, there has been no movement on the docket since October. The parties' motions to dismiss have been filed and denied. This is typically followed by a discovery period, where documents are exchanged and witnesses are deposed. Depending on the nature of the case, this process could last for a couple months or several years. Towards the end of discovery, parties will routinely move for summary judgment, and this would likely necessitate another hearing. Depending on how congested the Court's docket is, a ruling could take a few weeks or several months. I will say that there does not seem to be any material facts in dispute, so a trial in this case seems unlikely. I would not be surprised if the case is disposed of on summary judgment. Plus, it's important to keep in mind that 90%+ of cases like this end up settling. This is especially true when it appears that a case is unlikely to be resolved quickly in court. The longer the case takes, the greater the legal fees, and the greater incentive there is to resolve the dispute through settlement. I will check in with the progress of the case periodically and report here if anything happens, assuming y'all are interested.
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  6. Come stay downtown and give it a try. Downtown Nashville is now one of the most vibrant downtowns in the nation. It's crazy what has happened down there in the past 20 years.
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  9. Nashville Urban Planet 2016 Year in Review It has been another stellar year in development in and around Nashville. Perhaps ranking as one of the best ever. Here is a basic recap, with an emphasis primarily within the core and Midtown: NEW PROJECTS ANNOUNCED: Second and Demonbreun (40 story condo tower, 40 story apartment tower, 17-story hotel, retail, restaurants). NW corner of First Ave. South and Demonbreun Endeavor Residential Tower (27 stories, 362 units & Whole Foods) at NW corner of Broadway and 12th Ave. North Hyatt Regency Tower (estimate of 22-30 stories, 540 rooms) at NW corner of Broadway and 9th Ave. North Embassy Suites (30 stories, 400 rooms, restaurants), NW corner of Demonbreun and 7th Ave. North Curio Hotel (22 stories, 250 rooms, restaurants), NE corner of Demonbreun and 8th Ave. South Hensler/Eakin Trolley Barns site (20 story residential, 6 story office, and several 4 story retail/restaurants buildings) SE corner of Hermitage Ave. and Peabody St. The Joseph Hotel (21 stories, 297 rooms, restaurants), SW corner of KVB and 4th Ave. South Drury Plaza Hotel (21 stories, 390 rooms, restaurants), NW corner of KVB and 3rd Ave. South StayBridge Suites (estimate 10-12 stories, 120 suites), NE corner of McGavock and 13th Ave. South The W Hotel and Residences (18 stories, 250 hotel rooms, 200 residential units), SW corner of Laurel and 12th Ave. South Margaritaville Hotel (14-stories, 238 rooms, restaurants), NW corner of 5th Ave. South and Peabody Broadstone Gulch (14 stories, 238 residential units, restaurants), SW corner of Division Street and 8th Ave. South Hilton Tru/Home2Suites dual brand (10 stories, 233 rooms, restaurant), SE corner of 5th Ave. South and Peabody M Street Offices/Restaurant (3 stories, restaurant and office space) NE corner of Demonbreun and 11th Ave. South Hampton Inn/Tru Hotel dual brand (8-10 stories, 200 rooms), at 602 9th Ave. South Hyatt House Hotel (6-8 stories, 200 rooms?), NW corner of 5th Ave. South and Lea Ave. TownPlace Suites (6 story estimate, 168 rooms). NW corner of Gay St. and 4th Ave. North Germantown Union mixed-use project on former Goodwill Warehouse site (6 story 250,000 sq. ft. of office, 7 story hotel, 150,000 sq. ft. grocery/retail/office), NE corner of Monroe and Third Ave. North Hammer Mill complex (6 stories, 258 apartments, 20,000 sq. ft. for 3 restaurants). SE corner of Taylor and Adams. Gateway Germantown apartments (7 stories, 330 units). NW corner of Rosa Parks Blvd. and Garfield St. MDHA Housing apartments (5 stories, 100 units). SW corner of Rosa parks Blvd. and Cheatham Place 8th Avenue Storage (8 stories), NE corner of 8th Ave. South and Drexel. 3rd Avenue Storage (8 stories) SW corner of 3rd Ave. South and Lindsley Ave. Germantown Storage (6 stories w/ retail). SE corner of Monroe and 3rd Ave. North Landmark Germantown (3 stories, 22 townhomes), NW corner of Taylor and 2nd Ave. North 7th & Garfield (3 stories, 7 units), SW corner of 7th Ave. North and Garfield. Lifestyle Communities apartments (10 stories and 6 stories, 600 units), NW corner of 2nd Ave. South and Ash St. Hampton Inn addition (6 stories, 50 rooms), SE corner of Molloy and 4th Ave. South 5th and Broadway gets finalized (33-story 375,000 sq. ft. office building, 34-story 350-unit apartment building, National Museum of African American Music, 230,000 sq. ft. of retail) gets final approval on sale for old Convention Center site, lines up some tenants, is ready for demo and ground-breaking in 2017. Holiday Inn gets finalized (15 stories, 228 rooms, restaurant), NW corner of 4th Ave. South and Peabody Federal Courthouse finally approved (about 8 stories), SW corner of Church and 7th Avenue North. Virgin Hotel finally in motion (14 stories, 240 rooms, restaurants, music club). South corner of 17th Ave. south and Division St. Hyatt House Hotel (around 14 stories, 200 rooms), NW corner of Hayes and 21st Ave. North. Fairfield Inn and Suites (10 stories, 156 rooms), SW corner of Poston Ave. and 29th Ave. North. 30th Vanderbilt Place (12 stories, 200,000 sq. ft. office space). NW corner of Vanderbilt Place and 30th Ave. Spectrum Emery Office Building (8 stories, 130,00 sq. ft.) NE corner of 18th Ave. South and South St. Panattoni Office Building (6 stories, 120,000 sq. ft.), SE corner curve of Music Circle South Rudy Law Mixed-Use (14-story Hilton brand hotel, 22 story apartment) still seems to be percolating. NE corner of Broadway and 19th Ave. South. Brooklyn Bowl concert venue/entertainment complex to go on former Dury Photo site at SW corner of Ewing and Middleton (across form City Winery). ONE C1TY Element Hotel (7 stories, 169 rooms), west side of development at SW corner of 28th Ave. North and Charlotte Ave. The Gulch Pedestrian Bridge approved by Metro Council. Rumors of Zach Liff development (restaurants, shops, clubs on the eastern side of the bridge) Jefferson Street Land Bridge over I-40/65 and improvements along 10 block stretch Lower Broadway Walkability Project Moxy Hotel and Residential (7 stories, 130 rooms, 47 residential, restaurant), SE corner of Belcourt Ave. and 20th Ave. South Belcourt Village mixed-use (4 stories, residential, retail, restaurant), Belcourt Ave. across from Belcourt Theater UNDER CONSTRUCTION: Bridgestone Tower (30 stories, 500,000 sq. ft.), SE corner of Demonbreun and 4th Ave. South JW Marriott (34 stories, 532 rooms, restaurants), SW corner of Demonbreun and 8th Ave. South 222 Second Ave. (25 stories, 391,000 sq. ft. office space). SW corner of First Ave. South and Demonbreun Marriott Tri-Brand (22 stories, 486 rooms), SE corner of KVB and 5th Ave. South Cambria Suites (19 stories, 255 rooms, restaurant), SE corner of 8th Ave. South and McGavock 505 Church Street Tower apartments (45 stories, 550 units, restaurants), SW corner of Church and 5th Ave. North LifeWay HQ (10 stories, 272,000 sq. ft.), NW corner of 11th Ave. North and Jo Johnston Ave. Broadstone Gulch (14 stories, 238 residential units, restaurants), SW corner of Division Street and 8th Ave. South Solis Apartments (6 stories, 238 units). NE corner of 11th Ave. North and Jo Johnston Ave. Capitol View Phase II and III (5 buildings ranging 6 to 10 stories, 80,000 sq. ft. of retail/restaurant, 350,000 sq. ft. of office space, 375 apartments, 150-room Hilton-brand hotel, 2,200 space garages). NE corner of Charlotte Ave. and 11th Ave. North The Olmstead apartments (7 stories, 328 units). SW corner of 5th Ave. South and Peabody BWSC office building (8 stories, 125,000 sq. ft.), SW corner of 3rd Ave. South and Lea Ave. City Lights (8 stories on south end, 10 stories on south end, 71 condo units, restaurant), NE corner of Lea Ave. and Rutledge St. Harry O’s (former Trail West Bldg site, 5 stories, restaurant/bar). SE corner of Broadway and 3rd Ave. South Tribute Hotel addition (11-stories) NW corner of Church Street and Printers Alley Dream Hotel (11-stories, 169 rooms), between 4th Ave. North and Printers Alley Price Development (5-stories, 244 units), NW corner of 3rd Ave. North and Monroe Lifestyle Communities Germantown (six 6-story buildings, 450 units). NE corner of 2nd Ave. North and Monroe St. Seventh and Taylor Condos (3 stories, 6 units). 10th and Jefferson Apartments (4 stories, 54 units) Criminal Justice Center (5 stories), NE corner of James Robertson Pkwy and 3rd Ave. North Dual restaurant project (2 stories), SE corner of 6th Ave. North and Taylor. TopGolf Recreational Center (15 acres and 73,000 sq. ft. facility). NW corner of Jefferson Street and Cowan St. Ft. Nashboro reproduction on First Ave. North near Gay Street Connector Barnard Dorms (4 stories, 340 units), Vanderbilt Univ., West End Ave. near 23rd Ave. North Millennium Music Row (6 stories, 230 units, restaurant), NE corner of 17th Ave. South and Grand Ave. Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital addition (4 stories/80 ft. on top of existing 8 stories) Village 21 (4 stories, 101 units, 22,000 sq. ft. of retail/office), NE corner of Wedgewood and 21st Ave. South Southern Land mixed use (17 stories, 301 units, 67,000 sq. ft. of restaurant/retail), SE corner of Hillsboro Rd. and Richard Jones Rd. The Wabash (4 stories, 40,000 sq. ft. office space). NE corner of Woodland and South 9th St. ONE C1TY Apartments (7 stories, 276 units), south end of development at SW corner of 28th Avenue and Charlotte Ave. Green & Little Green Hills Hilton (8 stories, 207 rooms, restaurant), Marriott Residence Inn (9 stories, 207 rooms), and 30,000 sq. ft. of office/restaurant/retail, on SW corner of Crestmoor and Cleghorn Ave. At least a dozen more apartment/condo/townhome complexes in East Nashville At least 8 more apartment/condo/townhome complexes in Chestnut Hill/Wedgewood-Houston At least a dozen more apartment/condo/townhome complexes in 8th South and 12th South corridors. At least 10 more apartment/condo/townhome structures in West End Park and West End Avenue area At least a dozen more apartments/condo/townhome structures along Charlotte Ave. corridor and The Nations. At least 3 new dorms/academic centers at David Lipscomb Univ. At least one new dorm at Belmont Univ. At least one new dorm and School of Music at Travecca Univ. TOPPED-OUT OR COMPLETED: SoBro Apartments (33 stories, 313 units, restaurants). SW corner of Demonbreun and 2nd Ave. South Westin Hotel (27 stories, 452 rooms, restaurants). SW corner of 8th Ave. South and Clark St. HCA Parallon HQ (16 stories, 500,000 sq. ft., restaurant). NW corner of Charlotte Ave. and 11th Ave. North 909 Flats (6 stories, 232 units). SW corner of Rosa Parks Blvd. and Locklayer St. Carillon Apartments (4 stories, 306 units), SW corner of Jefferson St. and 4th Ave. North Broadstone Germantown (5 stories, 275 units). NE corner of Jefferson and 3rd Ave. North Gramercy Townhomes (3 stories, 10 units), NE corner of 7th Ave. North and Monroe St. Peyton Stakes (5 stories, 243 units). NW corner of Taylor and 3rd Ave. North The Gossett Apartments (6 stories, 376 units, restaurants), SE corner of Church and George L. Davis Blvd. The Diner (6 stories, restaurant). SE corner of 3rd Ave. South and Demonbreun The James Apartments (5 stories, 31 units, retail), NW corner of Division and Overton St. 1201 Demonbreun/Eakin Tower (15 stories, 285,000 sq. ft.), SW corner of Demonbreun and 12th Ave. South Thompson Hotel (12 stories, 224 rooms, restaurants), northern corner of 11th Ave. South and 12th Ave. South Division Street Connector River House apartments (5 stories, 245 units) Rolling Mill Hill MDHA Parking Garage (8 stories, 900 spaces), connected to 505 Church Street Tower on 5th Ave. North 1818 Church Street (7 stories, 142 units), NE corner of Church and 19th Ave. Hayes Street Garage (8 stories). SW corner of Hayes and 20th Ave. North Elite Health (4 stories), SW corner of Church and 21st Ave. North. Vanderbilt School of Engineering (7 stories), SE corner of 25th Ave. South and Garland Ave. The Element Music Row (19 stories, 431 units), eastern corner of Demonbreun and Division St. at Musica Circle The Morris (19 stories, 332 units, restaurant), NE corner of 19th Ave. South and Chet Atkins Place Aertson Midtown (14 stories, 7 stories, 350 units, retail, restaurants). SE corner of Broadway and 21st Ave. South Kimpton Hotel (17 stories, 180 rooms, restaurant), SW corner of Broadway and Division SESAC Office Building (5 stories, 110,000 sq. ft.), NW corner of 16th Ave. South and South St. Crescent Music Row Apartments (6 stories in front, 7 stories in back, 275 units, restaurants), SW corner of Division St. and I-65 innerloop The Cadence (6 stories, 193 units), NW corner of 16th Ave. South and McGavock St. Skyhouse Nashville (25 stories, 352 units, restaurant), SW corner of Broadway and 17thAve. South Element Gulch (3 stories, 19 units), NE corner of Hawkins and 13th Ave. south East Side Heights (5 stories, 249 units), SW corner of Woodland St. and South 5th St. Stacks on Main (4 stories, 268 units) NE corner of Main St. and Yeaman Place Summer Place (4 stories, 72 units), SE corner of South 5th Street and Summer Place DEMOLITION UNDERWAY OR COMPLETED: Myers Carpeting gone to make room for potential Crescendo apartment tower. Climax Hotel building was unsalvageable within Dream Hotel lot. Façade saved to be incorporated in facing of new building. Tennessee State Building at SW corner of Church and Rosa Parks Blvd. coming down as prep for the new Federal Courthouse. Former industrial storage buildings north of Church between 14th and 15th Avenues north torn down for new 10 story Comfort Inn and another mid-range hotel. NW corner of Hayes St. and 21st Ave. North Medical Building coming down for new Hyatt Place Hotel Old Criminal Justice Center/Jail being demolished to make way for new. SE corner of 3rd Ave. North and Gay St. SIGNIFICANT REHAB/REPURPOSING: Holston House (former James Robertson Hotel, 12 stories, 190 rooms), 7th Avenue North The Bobby Hotel (8 stories, 144 rooms, restaurant). 4th Avenue North The Fairlane Hotel (13 stories, 72 rooms, restaurant). SW corner of Union St. and 4th Ave. North 21c Museum Hotel (7-stories, 124 rooms, restaurant), 2nd Ave. North Moxy Hotel (5 stories, 161 rooms) near 3rd Ave. South and Broadway 227 Second Ave. North Condos (3-stories, 5 units) The Valentine (4 stories, restaurant/bar), Broadway AJ’s Place (3 stories, restaurant/bar), Broadway Nudies Honky Tonk (3-stories, restaurant/bar), Broadway Dierks Bentley’s Whiskey Row (4 stories, restaurant/bar), Broadway Almost Famous Honky Tonk (4 stories, restaurant/bar), 2nd Ave. North George Jones Museum (4 stories, museum, restaurant/bar), 2nd Ave. North Moonshine Flats (4-stories, restaurant/bar), 2nd Ave. North Tavern on Third (4 stories, restaurant/bar), 120 3rd Ave. South Tom Morales leasing 221 5th Ave. North (3 stories, site of famous Civil Rights-era sit-ins) for new restaurant) Geist House Restaurant (1-story), SE corner of Jefferson St. and 4th Ave. North World Gym in old Antique Store on SE corner of George L. Davis and Grundy 1101 Grundy into office space (4 stories) on SE corner of 11th Ave. North and Grundy Mainland Condo Project in/around former Elliott School (3 stories, 90 units). NW corner of Jefferson and 6th Ave. North Barista Parlor Coffeehouse (1-story), SE corner of Monroe and 4th Avenue North Van Buren triple restaurant project in old warehouse buildings (1-2 stories). SE corner of Van Buren and Cumberland River Greenway Chauhan Restaurant Group buys 1.75 acres at SE corner of Taylor and Cumberland River Greenway for several more restaurants in old warehouse structures there. Belcourt Theater (2 stories, 3 theaters, offices, classrooms), north side of Belcourt Ave. near 21st Ave. South 50 Music Square West to be converted into hotel by Jay Patel (11 stories, 200 rooms), SE corner of 17th Ae. South and South Street. Cordell Hull State Government Building Sullivan Tower and Frost Building to be kept and repurposed within the Southwest Venture Plans for former LifeWay Campus site according to a source. CANCELLED PROJECTS: Crescent Demonbreun (35 stories, apartments). SE corner of Demonbreun and 9th Ave. South Smithfield Development (40, 33, 27, and 10-story complex). SW corner of 6th Ave. South and Division Street. MAJOR PROPERTY TRANSACTIONS: The Tennessean announced they are selling their 10-acre property at NW corner of Broadway and 12th Ave North Hensler now owns nearly all of the block where Déjà vu is located now for possible condo tower complex. NW corner of 12th Ave. South and Demonbreun 810 Lea lot just west of Westin now owned by New Orleans developer who promises something substantial. Mainland continues to solidify with small properties around several acre lot at SE corner of KVB and Lafayette for major development. Monroe Investment Group keeps buying land around Cowan Street Corridor, and just north of Nissan Stadium. Now totals over 105 acres. Centurion Stone 12-acre property along Cumberland River just north of Hammer Mill project in Germantown up for sale. Zach Liff now owns 3 acre former Land Port property just east of Cummins Station for future development. Essentially was a land-swap for property at the east side of the Gulch Pedestrian Bridge that Liff owned. Listening Room relocating from NW corner of 2nd Ave. South and Molloy, so Ragland can try and sell/develop the remainder of that block already filled with SoBro Tower and The Diner. New Listening Room will be directly to the west of the Lifestyle Communities 6 & 10 story apartments at 3rd Ave. South and Ash. 5.6 acres on Athens Way (west of Metro Center) bought by Nayan Patel for motel complex (most likely). Land between 20th Ave. South and Lyle Ave. along north side of Broadway purchased by Vanderbilt Univ. Had been area for proposed two-tower project. Castle Rock Equity buys 3,38 acres along Demonbreun from Elmington Group for$33.5 million. Still plans massive multi-tower mixed-use project. Hensler involved with several investors on most of 2 acre block along north side of Demonbruen between I-65 and 12th Ave. South for possible large-scale development. OTHER HUGE PROJECTS: BNA Airport Vision, $1.2 billion N-Motion Mass Transit Plan, $6 billion Possible new Vanderbilt Football Stadium New TSU Football Stadium and other expansion Possible MLS stadium At least three $100+ million developments in Cool Springs area Oh… and Freddie Mac declared Nashville the #1 housing market in America during several months of the year. Other than that…not much happening. ; )
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  10. I know most UPer's (sp) see this shot daily to check on status of 300 ST but just maybe you haven't caught this one just yet...stunning!!
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  11. A few pics while walking across the KVB Bridge: Sobro A better skyline pic? Another popular photo opportunity...
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  13. A crude representation of the River North project in context to downtown. I did not attempt to show other buildings downtown or elsewhere.
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  15. I've posted similar pictures before as I work in the Viridian a lot but I thought I would post these from yesterday since 505 has grown a lot recently.
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  21. I'd rather this than a high rise. This looks great. I look forward to the inevitable value engineering.
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  22. From 1945 to 1974, Lindsley Hall had been the home of the Nashville Children's Museum, where they still had a snake-petting room in 1958 (where they had us touch milk-snakes). It also was the home of an elaborate large-scale model railroad layout and diorama, with scale replicas of a number of Nashville landmarks, including Union Station, the L&C Tower, and Woodmont Christian Church (with its towering spire). When the museum moved to its current facility at Ft Negley Blvd as the Cumberland Science Museum (now Adventure Science Center), the train layout was permanently dismantled, and many of the buildings were placed in storage at the current museum. The last time I had visited the old museum was in 1973. Along with the church, the Union Station replica, about 3-1/2 to 4 feet tall, was donated to the Tennessee Central Ry Museum around 2007, and to help ensure safety in transit from its then-owners in a temporary display at One Hundred Oaks Shopping Center, they had me ride in the back of van to hold the object secure for the ride. It remains on display at its current berth. BTW, I forgot that we had gotten a hold of the model replica of the old South Central Bell Office Bldg. (a subsidiary of the former Bell System prior to the 1982 breakup, with the subsidiary eventually coming under control of Bell South). That model can be seen on the table to the right of the L&C miniature), replete with most everything before it became "green" and the current home of our beloved you-know-who in the Westview Condo's.
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  23. This might be the most researched and detailed post ever on the Nashville forum. Thank you!
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  25. Hi NASHVILLE FROM CHARLOTTE!! All I can say is very very very impressive. I last looked at your city on UP probably 4-5 yrs ago and I was not impressed just to be blunt. But after browsing this project thread I must say I'm super impressed. I think you guys could give Charlotte a run for her money over the next decade or so. Being from NC and having lived in or within 15 miles of uptown for about 20 yrs+ I am used to cranes and constant construction. I think I counted at least 7 or 8 cranes in a few of Nashville's recent photos. Im not overly impressed with a lot of the current architecture but the new towers are truly going to transform Nashville. I love Charlotte and I will always be partial to my city, but there's always room at the top. I love that southern cities like Nashville, Austin and Charlotte and of course Atlanta are making such amazing strides. I love the direction we are all going in and I think it's only going to get better. Once again, Nashvilles skyline is becoming big and beautiful and I will be watching these towers grow ever upwards!! I admit that I've only been to Nashville with work when I was a Flight Attendant and I stayed very close to the airport, so I haven't experienced Nashville per say.
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  28. The Customs House on Broadway is one of Nashville's premier historic architectural gems. President Rutherford B. Hayes was on hand to lay the cornerstone in 1877, and it's Victorian Gothic ornate Kentucky limestone and Missouri granite details are stellar. Initially it housed the Post Office, customs activities, and federal courtrooms. As Nashville continued to grow, there was a need for another Gothic addition in the back (south), and then the wings on the east and west sides were added in 1916. When the Estes Kefauver Federal Building was finished, just to the west, in 1974, the U.S. government declared the Customs House surplus property, and deeded it to Nashville's Metro Government. Since that time it has been renovated into office space, as well as federal bankruptcy and appeals courts. I have visions that someday it might be made into a luxury hotel, a la Union Station. I could see a modern 25+ story addition being added to the back parking lot (currently owned by First Baptist Church) that would incorporate some of the themes of the pointed arched entrances and windows, as well as elements of the spires. The large, high-ceilinged courtrooms on the first floor and third floors of the oldest central section could be made into high-end restaurants, perhaps a jazz club, and meeting/event spaces. All of this would require substantial retrofitting, land procurement, etc. But one can dream, can't they? : ) In the meantime, on the 100th anniversary of the "newest" wings of the building (and 139th overall), let's celebrate one of our uniquely beautiful giants. The current version. The wings on either side really add to it's grandeur. The 1903 version with the addition to the back. The original version, 1877-1902:
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  29. The very best solution to any questions regarding development maps is the one built and maintained by Smeagolsfree on this very site. I think he might be bashful about tooting his own horn on this---but it is BY FAR the best map of it's type for Nashville. Here's the link. Bookmark it and check it often---it is invaluable. https://www.urbanplanet.org/forums/development-maps/nashville-development-map/ A screen shot of just the few blocks in discussion here shows all the activity either underway or about to happen. When you click on each piece of property on the actual map (not the screen shot), a box opens with all the basic info about the structure, renderings, the developer, and a link to a news story. As always, big kudos to Smeagolsfree for his tireless work on continually updating this wonderful resource. : )
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  30. I've heard Tokyo also has a unique problem that threatens above ground public transit that Nashville doesn't have.
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  31. With the redevelopment of the LifeWay Campus into Nashville Yards, along with the eventual re-imagining of the Tennessean's 10-acre campus, the new Endeavor site, and all the activity in the Gulch...I got to thinking what might happen someday in the forgotten area UNDER the Broadway Viaduct. So, one morning recently I walked across the CSX tracks, climbed over several trains that were parked there, and did some exploring. I know it's kinda spooky right now, but I could see an area of shops, perhaps a couple of restaurant/clubs, maybe even an outdoor stage under the protection of the span above, etc. The primary challenge would be parking, since there is no direct entranceway into the site...but that could add to it's uniqueness. Maybe the area could be dubbed "Below Broadway." A couple of well-lit stairways on either side of the viaduct above could lead downwards (perhaps an elevator as well). If a below-grade parking garage is built beneath the new Hyatt Regency along Broadway in the Nashville Yards development, then there could be an entrance from that side, too. I think there's a lot of potential for this, especially as more foot-traffic abounds with all of the new entities within several blocks over the next decade. I'm not sure if this land is owned by CSX (at one time there were three sets of tracks that ran underneath Union Station that served as the primary conduits for passenger trains back in the day). But one thing is for certain, the area has sat unattended for at least 4 decades. Perhaps those three arched train entrances could be reopened to some development under Union Station and leading upwards to the gorgeous lobby above. Or, maybe (fingers crossed!) someday they could be reconstituted as part of a new passenger terminal that would run underneath the hotel and back into the parking lot where the former railway shed stood on the south side of Union Station. Anyway---it's all fodder for discussion. Looking south underneath the viaduct at the three 16' tall former train entrances below Union Station: Looking up at Union Station from under the south side of the viaduct. This is where one of the stairways/elevators could be installed: Looking east with Broadway above. Some interesting shops or eateries/clubs might fit back in there. Looking up at Union Station from the eastern area below: Looking west at three three archways: Looking south: Looking east: Looking north from the archways. You can see that there is no auto access due to the CSX tracks hemming-in the whole area. That is the massive backside of the LifeWay/Nashville Yards campus on the right: Looking eastward up at the viaduct from the tracks: Looking south. The wall along the left is the backside of the LifeWay Campus. The new Hyatt Regency will be built along that section facing Broadway. Hopefully that billboard monstrosity will come down.
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  32. Just got word from a contact that The building floor totals are not final, depending on the rest of the leasing, the building is about 50-60% leased and they can add an additional 10 floors.
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  33. BNA has best year yet in 2016, up 11% in passenger traffic (about 1.3 million) over 2015. Grand total of 13 million passed through. http://www.bizjournals.com/nashville/news/2017/01/11/nashville-international-airport-posts-record.html
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  34. Ok...WOW! If this ever comes to fruition, it would be HUGE. However, I have to think this render is a "best-case scenario," unless someone knows something more. Still, a good sign for future development across the river. The biggest property owner on Nashville's East Bank is eyeing a spring start to construction of what eventually is expected to be a 105-acre mixed-use development that's being called River North. Chicago-based Monroe Investment Partners LLC plans to begin the work with a 40-acre first phase called The Landings at River North planned just north of the Kelly Miller Smith Memorial Bridge near where Jefferson Street becomes Spring Street. The overall River North Development District will span 125 acres, including where the Topgolf sports entertainment complex is rising. http://www.tennessean.com/story/money/real-estate/2017/01/10/name-plans-unveiled-huge-project-cumberland-rivers-east-bank/96355154/ http://www.bizjournals.com/nashville/news/2017/01/10/massive-river-north-project-could-juice-east-bank.html
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  37. I think each city has its nuances and quirks to it and when sobro gets as built up as downtown, the split will be some what of a signature look for Nashville. It may look different but that isn't a bad thing, its what can separate our skyline from others. People will always appreciate the atmosphere that lower Broadway offers. A slice of old brick buildings, like stepping back in time, offering entertainment, all surrounded by an urban landscape. Best of both worlds in my opinion
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  39. The view looking down 4th Ave: **Working on the floor of level 27
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  43. Ok...WOW! If this ever comes to fruition, it would be HUGE. However, I have to think this render is a "best-case scenario," unless someone knows something more. Still, a good sign for future development across the river. The biggest property owner on Nashville's East Bank is eyeing a spring start to construction of what eventually is expected to be a 105-acre mixed-use development that's being called River North. Chicago-based Monroe Investment Partners LLC plans to begin the work with a 40-acre first phase called The Landings at River North planned just north of the Kelly Miller Smith Memorial Bridge near where Jefferson Street becomes Spring Street. The overall River North Development District will span 125 acres, including where the Topgolf sports entertainment complex is rising. http://www.tennessean.com/story/money/real-estate/2017/01/10/name-plans-unveiled-huge-project-cumberland-rivers-east-bank/96355154/ http://www.bizjournals.com/nashville/news/2017/01/10/massive-river-north-project-could-juice-east-bank.html
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  44. I saw the model of the the eventual new Tennessee State Library and Archives building at the present location recently, and realized we don't have a thread for this beautiful new structure yet. Still no timeline set, as the State Legislature has not approved the $101 million budget for it...but eventually it should happen. Will be a great bookend to the Tennessee State Museum which is going up on the opposite corner of the north end of the Bicentennial Mall. Looking east from above where the Tennessee State Museum is being built: Looking NE: Looking north: Looking west from above where the just-completed Carillon Apartments are located: Rendering looking east from Carillon section of Bicentennial Mall (6th Avenue North): Rendering looking west from the Carillon Apartments side (the Avenue North): The site is the light blue block in the center of this screenshot from Smeagolsfree's amazing development map:
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  45. Cool sun glare effects downtown from the Adventure Science Center live cam this morning...
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  46. Right now option 3 is the most comprehensive plan out there. There has been a lot of input into the plan. We don't have much option as far as supporting the plan because there is no alternative. Go Big or Go Broke. Yes, they have to figure out the funding issue to the plan, but that will come. Taxes are going to rise and that is a fact. You can spend your time and gas money stuck in traffic or you can spend extra as far as tax dollars and use mass transit and not have to worry about the drive and use the time on the transit system on yourself. Therefore, the increase in taxes actually benefits your life and can actually ad time to your life instead of stressing over the drive everyday. Mass transit is not a money maker and neither are roads. It cost money because it is a necessity and its part of the infrastructure that the government really has the constitutional obligation to support thru taxes. Nashville Davidson is becoming more progressive and the outer counties are more conservative. If the folks in the outer ring do not approve any new taxes or funding they are the losers and will be stuck in traffic. I think Nashville will move forward regardless of what happens in the burbs. If nothing is done we are all losers. Taxes will rise anyway because we will not be able to recruit new business to the area and other business will suffer therefore making taxes rise. The only things that are certain in life are Death & Taxes. Don't know who said it, be he was dead on.
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  47. Personally, I like this design. I'm not sure why but i sorta like the aesthetics. I quickly threw together a very rough 3D model so I could tell how it would look with the rest of the skyline. (The colors were only for contrast and I can't remove the Observer building)
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  48. I actually got to try out my friend's drone today and snag a few nice shots... https://vimeo.com/198613310
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  49. From the rooftop of the Thompson on New Year's Day: And from an afternoon jog yesterday across the East Bank. The much-maligned Ghost Ballet offers some interesting vistas if you get past the typical tourist shots:
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  50. The Lifestyle Communities Germantown complex (six 4-6 story buildings, 450 units, retail, restaurants) is going to be one of the best developments in north of downtown in all of it's brick glory. Here is a rendering on one of the construction fences I don't believe we've seen before: Looking NE from corner of 2nd Ave. North and Madison St: Looking north along 2nd Ave. North from corner of Madison St: Looking north into central plaza area from Madison Street: Looking NW from corner of Madison and Cumberland River Greenway: Looking east into central plaza area from 2nd Avenue North: Looking SE along 2nd Ave. North from near Monroe St. interchange: Looking SW from corner of Monroe Street and Cumberland River Greenway: Looking south from corner of Monroe Street and Cumberland River Greenway: Looking SW from near the Neuhoff Packing Plant: Looking SE from near the corner of Monroe and 3rd Ave. North:
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