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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/30/14 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    Fieldmarshaldj- Can you please explain to me why when Tennessee has an $8 BILLION dollar budget ONLY for roads, you don't seem to care at all. Yet when Tennessee has the FIRST actual attempt at mass transit in decades, and the project chosen was the cheapest project by HUNDREDS OF MILLIONS, people suddenly start crying "wasteful spending"!!!! It makes zero sense. How do we think roads are paid for? Why does Tennessee only allow its citizens to use their federal dollars for roads, and their personal dollars for cars, gas, car insurance? It is not right.
  2. 1 point
    Ask and you shall receive. Sorry for the all-caps formatting. I am blind so I type my speeches in all caps double-spaced. GOOD AFTERNOON COMMISSIONERS: MY NAME IS BRETT WITHERS AND I LIVE AT 1113 GRANADA AVENUE IN EASTWOOD. I AM CURRENTLY SERVING IN MY FIFTH CONSECUTIVE YEAR AS THE PRESIDENT OF EASTWOOD NEIGHBORS. THANK YOU FOR GRANTING US YOUR TIME AND ATTENTION THIS AFTERNOON. EASTWOOD NEIGHBORS COMES BEFORE YOU TODAY TO REQUEST THAT YOU SUPPORT THE CLEARLY EXPRESSED WILL OF THE MAJORITY OF PROPERTY OWNERS TO EXPAND OUR NEIGHBORHOOD'S CONSERVATION ZONING OVERLAY TO INCLUDE ALL PROPERTIES WITHIN THE PROPOSED NEW BOUNDARIES. IT IS NO SECRET THAT DEMAND FOR THE INNER-CORE HISTORIC URBAN NEIGHBORHOODS LIKE EASTWOOD HAS RISEN EXPONENTIALLY OF LATE. BUT INSENSITIVE DEMOLITIONS AND INAPPROPRIATE INFILL ARE NOW DESTROYING THE VERY HISTORIC STRUCTURES THAT ARE EARNING OUR NEIGHBORHOODS NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL ATTENTION IN THE FIRST PLACE. A RECENT NEW YORK TIMES LISTING OF "52 PLACES TO GO IN 2014" RANKED NASHVILLE AT NUMBER 15 OUT OF ALL PLACES ON EARTH AND SPECIFICALLY CITED 12SOUTH AND EAST NASHVILLE AS PLACES TO VISIT. IN EASTWOOD, PLACING INTERNATIONALLY-ACCLAIMED RESTAURANTS NEXT TO UNPROTECTED 100-YEAR-OLD HOUSES IS PROVING TO BE A RECIPE FOR DISASTER. IF WE DO NOT ACT SOON, THERE WILL BE LITTLE HISTORIC CONTEXT LEFT WORTH VISITING. MANY OF THE HISTORIC STRUCTURES THAT OUR NEIGHBORHOOD IS REQUESTING TO PROTECT TODAY ARE MORE THAN JUST OLD HOUSES. RATHER, THEY EMBODY THE HISTORY OF OUR CITY'S GROWTH AND EXPANSION IN THE LATE NINETEENTH AND EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY. THE EARLIEST PLAT RECORDING FOR WHAT IS TODAY EASTWOOD WAS FILED BY THE WEAKLEY FAMILY IN 1855, WHO NAMED THEIR COMMUNITY BROWNSVILLE. BUT THE EASTWOOD OR BROWNSVILLE AREA REMAINED RURUAL UNTIL IT EMERGED IN THE 1890S AS A STREETCAR SUBURB JUST PAST THE CITY LIMITS. MANY OF THE PROPERTIES IN THE 1100 BLOCKS SERVED INDIVIDUALS WHO TOOK THE GALLATIN ROAD STREETCAR TO WORK DOWNTOWN. MANY OF THE HOUSES FRONTING OR NEAR PORTER ALSO ATTRACTED USERS OF THE EASTLAND STREETCAR LINE, WHICH TURNED ON PORTER. STILL OTHER PROPERTIES IN THE INTERIOR OF THIS AREA WERE ORIGINALLY FARMHOUSES OR ESTATE HOMES WHOSE LANDS WERE LATER SUBDIVIDED AS THE STREETCAR USING POPULATION GREW. THE 1927 SANBORN FIRE INSURANCE MAP SHOWS THAT EASTWOOD WAS ALMOST TOTALLY BUILT OUT AT THAT TIME. SO MANY OF THESE HOMES HAVE SURVIVED NOT ONLY THE 1998 TORNADO, BUT EVEN THE 1933 TORNADO. BUT NOW THEIR GREATEST THREAT IS OF HUMAN MAKING. IF CONSERVATION ZONING OVERLAYS WERE NOT WORTHWHILE, THERE WOULD BE LITTLE SUPPORT FOR THEM. BUT EASTWOOD IS ALREADY THE SECOND NEIGHBORHOOD TO COME BEFORE THIS BODY SO FAR IN 2014 SEEKING AN EXPANSION. EASTWOOD'S PRESENT OVERLAY BOUNDARIES CAN BEST BE DESCRIBED AS PIECEMEAL. OUR NEIGHBORHOOD HAS EXPERIMENTED WITH SPLITTING BLOCKS AND HAVING ONE HOUSE IN AND THE NEXT HOUSE OUT OF THE OVERLAY SINCE OUR LAST CZO EXPANSION IN 2007. THAT SITUATION HAS GENERATED CONFUSION BOTH FOR INDIVIDUAL PROPERTY OWNERS AND FOR THE DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY. THAT EXPERIMENT HAS FAILED. BUT THE PROPOSED BOUNDARIES, WHICH ARE CONSISTENT ACROSS BLOCK FACES, WILL RESOLVE MANY OF THOSE DISCREPANCIES. AGAIN, EASTWOOD NEIGHBORS HAS HEARD PROPERTY OWNER REQUESTS TO EXPAND OUR CZO FOR ALL FIVE YEARS THAT I HAVE BEEN PRESIDENT OF EASTWOOD NEIGHBORS. THIS CONVERSATION PREDATES THE RISE OF UMBILICAL-CORD DUPLEXES, ALTHOUGH THAT TREND HAS CERTAINLY INCREASED THOSE CALLS. UNFORTUNATELY, THE MHZC WAS TOO SHORT STAFFED TO ACCOMMODATE ANY EXPANSION REQUESTS FOR SEVERAL YEARS. THANKFULLY, THE METRO COUNCIL ADDED A MHC STAFF POSITION THIS FISCAL YEAR TO ENABLE THESE CONVERSATIONS TO CONTINUE IN SOME OF OUR NEIGHBORHOODS. COUNCILMAN PETER WESTERHOLM'S LETTER TO YOU AND THE PLANNING DEPARTMENT STAFF NOTES DESCRIBE HOW OUR NEIGHBORHOOD ADVERTISED OUR INFORMATION SESSIONS AND REACHED OUT TO AS MANY PROPERTY OWNERS AS POSSIBLE OVER THE LAST SEVERAL MONTHS IN ORDER TO DETERMINE WHICH AREAS HAD MAJORITY PROPERTY OWNER SUPPORT FOR EXPANDING THE CZO. THE FINAL SURVEY RESULTS WERE ANALYZED FOR COUNCILMAN WESTERHOLM'S REVIEW. THE PERCENTAGE OF PROPERTY OWNER SUPPORT EXPRESSED WAS OVERWHELMING. BUT SOME PROPERTY OWNERS WERE OPPOSED AND COUNCILMAN WESTERHOLM HAS ALREADY TAKEN THOSE RESPONSES INTO ACCOUNT IN SHAPING THE PROPOSED BOUNDARIES. OUR SURVEY RESULTS SHOWED TWO BLOCKS WHERE THE MAJORITY OF PROPERTY OWNERS OPPOSED EXPANSION. THOSE TWO BLOCKS HAVE ALREADY BEEN EXCLUDED FROM THESE BOUNDARIES. IN SUMMARY, I ASK THE COMMISSIONERS TO APPROVE EASTWOOD NEIGHBORS' CZO EXANSION REQUEST TO INCLUDE ALL PROPERTIES IN THE PROPOSED BOUNDARIES. OUR SURVEY PROCESS WAS FAIR AND WELL ADVERTISED AND REFLECTS THE WILL OF THE MAJORITY OF OUR PROPERTY OWNERS. THANK YOU.
  3. 1 point
    Don't tear it down, but at least renovate/restore it. It makes that part of the block look dilapidated. I can't see that as a selling point to developers. Keeping a busted building for no purpose other than history, at least make it useful and put up some historical plaques of some kind (maybe there are and I've just missed them.) Having a shell doesn't really add character IMO.
  4. 1 point
  5. 1 point
    Tear it down for what though? Another skyhouse like apartment building? It's a very unique structure and gives the city an older feel. Tearing down would be awful in my opinion.
  6. 1 point
    You bring up some good issues that I think highlight some of the misunderstandings at the heart of this debate. First, here are a few links that cover the disproportionate doling out of federal dollars to Tennessee and red states generally: http://wallethub.com/edu/states-most-least-dependent-on-the-federal-government/2700/#main-findings http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/statements/2012/jan/26/blog-posting/red-state-socialism-graphic-says-gop-leaning-state/ You are correct that the concentration of military bases in the south has something to do with this discrepancy, but that's only a piece of the larger story. For example, here's a link about which states have the highest percentages of food stamp recipients: http://www.governing.com/gov-data/food-stamp-snap-benefits-enrollment-participation-totals-map.html Part of the reason that redder states typically receive more federal money than bluer states is indeed because there are more military bases. But part of the reason the locations for those bases were chosen in the first place is because land was cheap due to relatively weaker economies in the selected areas and because the money spent on those bases could serve as a strategic jobs program and economic boost for the places that needed the help the most. I don't mean to say that all military spending is merely a federally subsidy in disguise, of course, but it's not an accident that our tax dollars are continuing to build obsolete tanks against the wishes of the Pentagon (http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2013/04/28/army-says-no-to-more-tanks-but-congress-insists/) I don't mean to say that the military is the only culprit when it comes to spreading out federal dollars among the states without being so blatant as a direct kickback. There are plenty of bureaucratic office complexes, federal courthouses, Olympic training facilities, etc. to spread around. Pork barreling only works because everybody gets a taste of the action (except Cooper). Additionally, things like the snowbird influx absolutely influence these assessments, but, similar to strategic military base location, snowbird migration doesn't happen in a vacuum. Beyond just the good weather, many retiree hotspots rose to prominence as a result favorable tax climates specifically designed to attract said demographic in order to spur already struggling economies, and, again, cheap land. My point is, while it's fair to question the contributing factors that have led to a greater federal dependency among redder states, you can only get so far by handpicking which factors to consider in the case of any given state. The trend as a whole is what's telling here. Your point about Eisenhower and the Interstates is interesting. You're right that one of the primary considerations when conceiving the interstate system was national defense, but there were a lot of other competing motivations that played as much if not a larger role in actually bringing the project to fruition. Yes, it was probably a good idea to have the country cross-hatched with landing strips and capable of quickly transporting an army across 3000 miles in the event that we had to simultaneously defend attacks on two separate coasts, but we also wanted to create a more flexible interstate commerce shipping medium, we had lots of newly unemployed GIs who needed jobs, and we had a lot of re-purposed factories that needed start making cars instead of munitions and fighter planes. Bottom line, there were a lot of reasons that we built the interstates, just like there are a lot of reasons that people want to build the AMP (and a lot of reasons people oppose it). To write the analogy off as apples and oranges, however, misses the point of the metaphor. Even if the sole purpose for the interstate system was military infrastructure, it has clearly evolved well beyond that. When I40 gets a new off-ramp in Nowhereton, New Mexico, it's not because the DOD decided that was a necessary tactical move. The point of the analogy is that citizens of Nashville don't complain when Nowherton, New Mexico (or Bend, OR) gets a new off-ramp even though almost none of us will ever take that exit, because sometimes we need and get new local off-ramps that we know most of the other people in this country will never see any benefit from whatsoever. The same rule applies whether we are talking about building a bridge in Memphis, a 4 lane highway in Cookeville, or a BRT in Nashville. Unlike your previous arguments, I have a hard time understanding where you're coming from with your remark about the Tennessee Democrats who apparently created the original ban on wine in grocery stores. I don't know when the law originated, but what's with the fixation on the letter next to the name of those who drafted it? That's the same logic FMJD employs when he tries to tie the modern Democratic party to the pro-slavery/pre-Civil Rights era Democrats. There are only two parties to choose from, and their positions on any given issue have been far from steady over the past 150 years since they last had a serious third-party contender. The Southern Strategy, as one example, turned into a pretty big game of red rover between those who linked arms with D's and those who sided with R's. Regardless of what letter was next to the name of the legislator who decided to ban wine in grocery stores, I think it was a bad idea. Who cares what label was worn by the guy who had that bad idea, especially considering how interchangeable those labels are? "That being said the issue is just politics... The TN s do not want to give Dean a boost by funding the AMP because he may run for governor and they do not want to help his prospects.... no surpass there and both parties make the same political calculations everyday in this country." A couple of posts ago, I mentioned that I thought many republicans in the state legislature opposed the AMP primarily because they saw a new-and-improved mass transit system as a progressive victory, and they were more concerned with winning the game than solving the problem. Based on your statement here I guess we agree? What I'm not on board with, however, is brushing off the gamesmanship as though it's acceptable. Yes, both Democrats and Republicans often prioritize politics (and fundraising) above almost anything else, but that's not a good thing. There's no better time to publicly condemn that gamesmanship than when those doing the politicking are people with whom you otherwise agree. Even then, it's a long shot, but I think it's got to be better than complacent acceptance and blame-sharing, business as usual.
  7. 1 point
    Has already been posted in another thread but I thought it belongs here as well. http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/03/28/4802391/bmw-plans-1-billion-expansion.html#.Uzek2PldW05 BMW is doing another 1 Billion dollar expansion to its Plant in Greer SC, and is going to build 2 new X series cars in Greenville adding 800 jobs. This will make this the largest BMW plant in the world. I don't think the CLT-MUC flight on Lufthansa is going anywhere.
  8. 1 point
    Not to mention that TN is in the top ten of states that rely on the Feds. The argument that "my constituents won't use the Amp" vs. "residents of Bend, OR won't use an interstate that runs in TN." Just as laughable as the liquor store lobbyists argument that "wine isn't food". Well, neither are lightbulbs, detergent, magazines, pencils, etc.
  9. 1 point
    http://www.businessreport.com/article/20140328/BUSINESSREPORT0112/140329815 If this is successful, eventually rail will follow with likely more passengers as it's a novelty.
  10. 1 point
    Again, no surface parking on the HCA parcel. The HCA parcel will be integrated with the rest of the development, it will be mixed use.
  11. 1 point
    Getahn, we're all sorry about Gail. She will be missed.
  12. 1 point
    The Upstate Business Journal reports that Saffrons will be leaving Augusta Street in the West End for the Village Of West Greenville.
  13. 1 point
    I went to The Village Arts District last night for Open Studios, which was a ton of fun and had a huge turnout. I was surprised to see that there are actually several pop up shops setup for the holidays. This area is such a gem. Check it out if you haven't experienced Open Studios or if you haven't been to the Village in a while! My favorite studios are probably the ones in the flat iron building.
  14. 1 point
    http://connections.greenvillesc.gov/forms/ClosingPresentation.pdf This encompasses much more than just West Greenville, but the entire Westside.
  15. 1 point
    West Greenville Village is cleaner to me, but either is preferable to 'Far West End'. Really glad to see the Clemson involvement.
  16. 1 point
    How's everyone feel about the new name? I like the ability to refer to it as "the village".
  17. 1 point
    This is nice to see. Kudos to Clemson. Link below. http://gsabusiness.mappsite.com/news.php?link=http://www.gsabusiness.com/news/48493-clemson-to-open-art-studio-in-greenville
  18. 1 point
    I have heard from a respectable commercial real estate agent in the area that the guy listed with the Brandon Mill is a crook. He swindled millions out of a town in NC. In other words...dont expect it to go forward.
  19. 1 point
    "On the other side of Greenville, Brandon Mill is waiting for its chance at a new life. "A mixed-use development with 173 apartments was recently proposed for the mill of Shoeless Joe Jackson fame, along with restaurants, a grocery store and other commodities that the Westside is missing." http://www.greenvilleonline.com/article/20130623/NEWS07/306230001/Historic-Conestee-Brandon-mills-line-redevelopment
  20. 1 point
    http://www.GreenvilleCounty.org/County_Council/_Agenda/Meetings%20of%202013/Planning%20and%20Development/2013.07.15/CZ-2013-25%20summary%20and%20report.pdf



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