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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/24/22 in all areas

  1. Insta: @mattshdr Awesome view!
    17 points
  2. Happy Thanksgiving to all my fellow Nashville U.P.'ers! We have much to be thankful for in the continued skyrocketing development in and around Music City. And I'm thankful to share in it with so many knowledgable fellow enthusiasts. : ) For TBT, here's a fun last from the past at the expense of our friends in Cincy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BGFtV6-ALoQ&t=14s
    9 points
  3. 7 points
  4. 6 points
  5. Happy thanksgiving everyone! I was in town for the parade last night and was walking around. Didn’t have my phone to take a pic but the backside of this project on the college st side, looks like there could potentially be 3 to 4 retail spots on the street level facing the convention center. Not a lot of info on the retail layout for this project to confirm this but that would be good news.
    5 points
  6. I'll take one of the Alexandria example on the Crosland property at the corner of South & Scaleybark, please
    5 points
  7. 5 points
  8. What a shot! I like how you can see Fury 325's lift hill in the background.
    4 points
  9. Lots of potential land for development
    4 points
  10. https://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/business/development/article269136927.html
    4 points
  11. Today this evening. Heavy traffic at BNA. Happy Thanksgiving and Be safe over there.
    4 points
  12. Interesting to say the least. I am guessing purple is parking garages and red are surface lots. From CLT Development twitter courtesy of Paingaroo (not a parrot) @Paingaroo Ever wondered just how much of Uptown is taken up by parking?
    4 points
  13. Was surprised to see this in a handicapped spot at the Teeter.
    4 points
  14. Seeing as no lease was ever signed for 1001, I tend to doubt the building was ever designed to be Amazon specific, but rather a spec office tower. As we have seen with the Pinnacle tower, an anchor tenant could aboslutely come in and work to redesign the building, but a redesign does not happen without something behind it. With the current market right now on spec office space being such a risk, I believe the garage will get topped out and the "ground floor" be left a blank slate until something comes along that prompts construction. We have to remember that the garage was designed with an office tower in mind so any redesign of the building - into say a hotel or a residential tower - will have certain structural parameters that they will need to take into consideration. It's moving along, but no renderings have come out because they haven't designed a single building yet. The master plan was submitted earlier this year and they have been going through the process of selecting the design for each phase of their campus. They do have active office space though in the city where they have been hiring - and firing recently - staff. They have already fronted a large chunk of money for the infrastructure along the soon to be expanded Cowan Street and other improvements, so I would say they are still pretty bullish on things. They have also closed on their properties which are I believe are in Opportunity Zones that give them tax breaks for long term investments. The Oracle land is a large campus that takes time to come together. We have been spoiled by some projects that are announced and immediately/soon after start up. Large developments - especially those that control almost 4,000 feet of riverfront takes time.
    4 points
  15. These buildings will be nice to gawk at just as Legacy Union X and Duke Energy 2 will be, but in my opinion, Road dieting South blvd and Tryon as well as turning Camden road into an activated, pedestrian-only commons/public square would transform South End. We may have different ideas of transformation, however.
    4 points
  16. That’s not true that only 2 exist. In the DC metro area there are 4 or so urban wegmans alone (I think only the Reston one isn’t open yet). Alexandria, Tyson’s, Reston, DC. Which makes me wonder, where else Wegmans have these urban formats. Seems prime for Dallas, Atlanta and I’d even say Charlotte & the Triangle Any of the below would be perfect for SouthEnd/LoSo (which I’ve finally come to accept as an actual thing lol) Tysons Alexandria Reston DC
    4 points
  17. When people say ‘but no one uses these bike lanes’, show them this. Where would they drive if the road network looked like this? The absence of a true network is precisely the problem! (Orange and yellow links have not yet started construction)
    4 points
  18. downtown Kannapolis in my pre-dinner walk. The new 7 story Stadium Lofts is up to to its expected height. New wine bar opening in the Vida apartments retail space across from the Armory Brewery. Lots of new TriPointe townhomes have been built and sold in downtown. Today happy Thanksgiving. New food trailer at the brewery's side patio too. DT Kannapolis has renovated 2 theaters in the time that Charlotte has not finished the Carolina Theater just saying. They renovated the Gem which plays movies and now opened the Swanee which is a live music theater.
    3 points
  19. My dear friends - I just wanted to wish everyone and all in our wonderful RVA/UP community a very Happy Thanksgiving!! May today be a day of family, friends, food, football, fun and festivity for all of you. Hope the weather in the River City is nice, particularly if you're going out to visit family/friends today/tonight. Everyone - enjoy the day - stay safe and be well!
    3 points
  20. copied from the Charlotte Urbanists subreddit: Charlotte’s Bicycle Advisory Committee - Meeting Updates for Oct. 25th & Nov. 15th. Hello Charlotte, The previous Bicycle Advisory Committee meeting on October 25th was relatively uneventful, hence why I did not post anything on it. The only thing of note that happened was we voted on whether to approve the minutes of a prior meeting and then we were given a presentation from Keith Bryant, an engineer within Charlotte D.O.T., that highlighted some upcoming projects in the city’s bicycle program. The twenty-eight questions that the community has fielded to me were pushed off to the next meeting. That being said, this meeting was much more lively and carried with it some weight. Let’s discuss the highlights. 1. The Transportation Bonds Passed - What Next? Hannah Bromberger, the Strategic Mobility Division Manager of Charlotte D.O.T., mentioned that the Transportation Bond that the City of Charlotte put forth on this year’s election ballot passed. There still needs to be some processing of the votes, but the bonds should be approved soon and subsequently the bicycle program will have funds available in early 2023. The total allocation of funds for the bicycle program will be $8 million over two fiscal years (2023-2024), which is double the previous allocation. Charlotteans can expect to see their city add more bike lanes in the coming years, though it should be noted that bike paths are also being incorporated through the use of road improvement funds, maintenance funds, and coordination with developers - so that money can stretch out a lot further than you’d think. 2. The Joint Meeting between Transit Services Advisory Committee & Bicycle Advisory Committee A joint meeting is ready and happening soon between the TSAC and BAC on Thursday, December 8th at 4PM. We agreed as a committee to attend, or at the very least, send representatives to attend - I volunteered to be one of the representatives since I was one of only two members that has used my bicycle with both the bus and our train systems here in Charlotte. The goal of this joint committee is to discuss bike parking near transit stations - what that should look like, how we should implement them, if it makes sense to have bike parking in certain areas, etc. The other item is using this time to make our city workers aware of some of the deficiencies in their transit combinations - specifically the state of disrepair that some of the buses’ bike racks are in. There have been two notable incidents where I had been unable to secure my bicycle to one of the racks because of the state of disrepair the bike rack was in. The other item is the limited capacity of the bike racks - even the #9 bus, which carries 1/10th of the city’s ridership population, only has room for two bicycles, with some people having to wait for the next bus entirely in order to transport their bike. 3. What happened to the community questions y’all gave me? This one has been a source of frustration - the prior meeting was supposed to have a segment of time dedicated to answering the twenty-eight questions the community gave me about cycling in Charlotte and some repeated issues. Today, we were supposed to have another segment of time - the staff had the list of questions and I was under the impression that since the agenda allocated specifically that these items would be discussed, that we would get answers. This was not the case, however. One of the members of the committee, during the plans for drafting next year’s goals, stated that we should use this list of questions as a resource. I was then “put on the spot” and told to consult the list of twenty-eight questions and highlight which ones were worth incorporating into the agenda. I stressed that I’d be happy to do that but that I had only fielded one of these questions and that the others were the result of twenty-seven different inquiries from Charlotteans, thus stating that they should be taken into consideration and have the time taken for them. I’m still going to try and get these questions answered wholesale and can at least answer some partially in a follow-up post based on my experience when I am fully recovered from COVID, but would like to stress that I am going to keep pressing this issue. You guys deserve to have your questions considered. That being said, here are some of the community items that the BAC has decided to prioritize going forward. 4. Future Priority Item: Parking in the Bike Lane With the issue of cars parking in the bike lane, Vice Chair Dustin Branham brought up that currently, cars can legally park in any bike lane so long as there are no “No Parking” signs beside the lane. The solution proposed was that either the city creates an amendment of the current laws to state outright that parking in a bike lane is prohibited or the city shells out the money for no parking signs along all of its bike lanes. The idea of bike lane bounties was brought up, but the chair reminded the committee that we were in the phase of highlighting issues, not necessarily discussing how to solve them just yet, so we opted to make it a priority and save the solutions for another day. 5. Future Priority Item: The CLT+ App (also known as 311) As for the CLT+ App, there are two issues I spoke on before we placed it on the list of priorities. One is that there is no clear means for a cyclist to report an obstruction in the bike lane - for that, Bromberger stated that depending on what is obstructing the bike lane, the request needs to be filtered out to either the Waste Department, Charlotte DOT, CMPD’s Animal Control, or some other miscellaneous department. Bromberger recognized that this could be improved in the app and would be looked into. The other issue with the CLT+ App is due to an item that I wanted to investigate first-hand. One of my peers at UNC Charlotte’s Masters in Public Administration program did a research study using Mecklenburg County’s Quality of Life dataset to see if there was any statistical relationship between neighborhoods with large African American and Hispanic populations and the usage of the 311 service. My peer found out that there was a strong, negative relationship between both of these demographics. This begged the question: do these populations simply not use the app or is there something else at play? I’ve talked to a lot of people throughout the city and one thing I’ve noticed is that my wealthier peers in better neighborhoods have a lot of great things to say about the city’s response time for various 311 requests, some of them stating that these issues would be fixed within the next day. Living in East Charlotte, I wanted to test this idea and so over the last two weeks, if I saw an obstruction on the sidewalk, a parked car in the bike lane, a broken sidewalk, a pothole, etc., I would immediately stop what I was doing, take a picture, and submit a full report via the 311 app, even if it was the same issue encountered before. Ultimately, I made 8 requests to address sidewalk obstruction (7 of these were cars parked on the sidewalk, 1 was a row of trash cans left on the sidewalk), 2 requests to remove a DOT Road Work Sign that was blocking the entire sidewalk, and another 2 requests to fix a sidewalk that is in such a poor state that foliage is starting to sprout from it. Out of all these submissions to the CLT+ App, I ultimately got back two phone calls. The first phone call was to say that the DOT sign apparently belonged to NCDOT and that Charlotte DOT “would remove [the sign] by Monday” (which should have been November 7th) - as of today, it is November 17th and the sign is still perched quietly on a segment of Lawyer Road’s sidewalk. The second phone call was to tell me that Charlotte DOT couldn’t actually do anything about cars parked on the sidewalk and to call CMPD about this - the representative for this case was unaware that the property in question was within a 3 minute walk of a CMPD headquarters, however. With this aspect, I stressed to the other committee members and to the Charlotte DOT staff that whatever improvements we made to the CLT+ App would ultimately be null if the requests ultimately went unanswered. That’s something I cannot stress enough - if we provide a new feature to report an issue, what good will it do if it ultimately falls of deaf ears? 6. Future Priority Item: Equity for Bicycle Facilities in East and West Charlotte This part of the conversation was somewhat spicy. A number of the comments I had received from the public highlighted how some of the painted (read: unprotected) bike lanes were inadequate and even hazardous, and if there were plans to upgrade them into protected bike lanes at some point. While that question hasn’t received a solid response yet, it did lead to a conversation about the poor facilities in West and East Charlotte, what few there are. I highlighted the need for a better bike lane on Central Avenue and one of the BAC members challenged me on this, asking if anyone even cycles on Central Avenue and if that route wouldn’t be better served by removing the lane and creating another bike lane that is simply parallel to that road. Those of you that live in East Charlotte and routinely travel on Central Avenue know that there isn’t a grid system on that roadway and that many cyclists already currently use it primarily because a lot of cyclists live and work on Central Avenue - the issue is that these cyclists do not fit the typical stereotype of a white, middle-to-upper class worker commuting into Uptown Charlotte with panniers on their commuter bike - they are often working low-wages, riding a second-hand mountain bike, African American and Hispanic, and (if they are carrying anything on their bike) use a backpack or plastic bags draped over the ends of the handlebars. Speaking frankly, I was furious about this suggestion - it seemed appalling that someone would recommend removing an incremental step in the right direction for our community, especially if they themselves hadn’t biked on that segment, and it reminded me of the importance of having a diverse committee. The vast majority of Central Avenue already meets the city’s criteria of being a Fifteen Minute City, as do segments of Albemarle Road, and I’ve routinely encountered cyclists on these routes - why do they not deserve a nice amenity and should instead be forced to take alternate routes? This led to a conversation among the committee and eventually we concluded that one issue to focus on was equity in the bike lane allocation - my hope is that with this being one of the priorities for the coming year, I can use this continually to push City Council and Charlotte D.O.T. into building more and better bike lanes in both West and East Charlotte, as both communities are lacking in these connections. Bonus: A Special Guest from BikeWalkNC Terry Lansdell, the director of BikeWalkNC, paid the BAC a visit during this meeting and had a lot of insightful things to say. When we discussed the issue of equity and bike lanes, Mr. Lansdell was quick to pose this question: “Are you a destination cyclist or are you a thru-cyclist? If you’re a destination cyclist, you need that … bike lane that gets you to your job. If you’re a thru-cyclist, you complain about that facility.” If you want to build an equitable bike lane, you need to make sure that these bike lanes get people to the places they need to go. Lastly, Mr. Lansdell highlighted that one of the key barriers toward making roadways safer and more accommodating to both pedestrians and cyclists here in Charlotte is state legislation. Currently, it is illegal for NCDOT to spend any money on bicycle & pedestrian facilities that are not already part of an existing road project. While a change to this legislation has been proposed for the last two years, something peculiar seems to happen. The proposal will pass the states’ house, senate, budget office, and even the governor himself, but always ends up being killed off by four state Republicans in the last 72 hours of the proposal. This is a potential item for advocacy that should be stressed further - I’ll work to get the names of these senators in the interim.
    3 points
  21. Seeing these pictures of the flat leveled lots, I can't help but think about all the fun times we had... at the ASCOT INN
    3 points
  22. Finally, a monument worthy of our city
    3 points
  23. My KJ picks for greenway walks for your out of town family, cousins, friends this long weekend in the QC. 1. For the hip and young I suggest the original LSG Little Sugar Creek in from Cordelia Park to uptown. Plenty of places nearby for a drink or coffee too. Or an alternative would be the Stewart Creek greenway from Wesley Heights to Uptown. 2. For the older and mobility challenged I suggest LSG again down behind Centrum Shopping center show them the wetland park and plenty of ADA parking available close by. See one of the larger wetlands in the county. 3. For the big city visitor looking for the country and wide open spaces I suggest West Branch of the Rocky River greenway up in Davidson starting in Aberdeen Park going down to Fisher Farm park. Very quiet and not a house in sight. 4. For the arts person I would suggest Briar Creek greenway park at the Mint Museum on Randolph walk the greenway and then visit the museum. 5. For the those in academia I would suggest the Toby Creek greenway through the UNC Charlotte campus. But get out and walk a greenway this long weekend and you will know you need it! Photos from the Hector Henry Greenway in Concord on Wed. off Weddington Road drop the relatives off at Concord Mills and go walking with those not interested in shopping. Great views of the Rocky River only seen when the leaves come off. if you have other ideas on ideal greenway walks lets hear them.
    2 points
  24. Maybe these guys can anchor Crescent’s Enterprise site. https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.charlotteobserver.com/news/business/banking/article266544321.html Toppling Bank of America’s crown in Charlotte? Jamie Dimon wouldn’t rule it out. The chief executive of JP Morgan Chase, the country’s biggest bank by assets, stopped in the city on Thursday, visiting with employees at a Chase branch in uptown Charlotte. The branch — coincidentally located across the street from competitor Bank of America’s corporate headquarters — opened in early 2020. It was Chase’s first location in the city. Now, the New York-based bank is up to 17 branches throughout the Charlotte region, with three more slated to open in 2023. “We’re going to double down,” Dimon told employees. “We’re not gonna stop.” JP Morgan Chase has about $3.4 trillion in assets— but here in Banktown, it punches well below its weight, controlling only 0.12% of the deposit market.
    2 points
  25. I am not a bit serious about canals or flooding streets and you are right it would be so expensive to have water go up hill it would cheaper to build a subway under uptown. Tryon is in on a ridgeline hence uptown. it is fun to talk about it though.
    2 points
  26. I love pics that include SouthEnd because it always has such eye-catching structural density. Good view indeed.
    2 points
  27. Why is there no local leadership that pushes for significantly improved transportation in Greenville? I get it; it's a car-oriented city. But the solution that government offers--build more roads and try to slow down development that would put more traffic on the roads--isn't going to fix the problem of growing traffic congestion. Rush hour traffic, and traffic along I-85, are far worse than they were 20 or 30 (and certainly 40) years ago, and simply building more roads just pushes traffic congestion back a few years. There is effectively no mass transit in Greenville County. Greenlink is so skeletal that it's not a viable transportation option for anyone who has an alternative. There is also effectively no mass transit (other than airlines, if that counts) around the Upstate and to Charlotte and Atlanta. There is no emphasis on carpooling, cycling, or other high-density, mixed-use development. The Atlanta-Greenville-Charlotte-Raleigh corridor is relatively densely populated, and similarly-sized cities and corridors elsewhere in the US have far better transportation options. Each of these could at least help provide alternatives for people who are sick of traffic and don't want to get stuck in it. Even if only a small percentage of people took mass transit (once mass transit became a viable option), carpooled, cycled or lived or worked in a mixed-use development, those people who chose those options would be free of the pain of driving in traffic. The response from some in the area- "the free market results in cars and roads as we have them, and anything else is Communism"- is not true. Politically, I'm a Libertarian or a Mitt Romney Republican, and plenty of people like me think that we can do better.
    2 points
  28. You definitely have good info, so I think that QB clearly has the green light. Your Instagram account is great by the way.
    2 points
  29. Yea for some reason I've never seen a retail leasing plan for this building.
    2 points
  30. Ok I get the liking of the LPA, it would drive demand to a lower demand area. On that I can agree. The question on demand drive that I have though is: is it justifiable? VS the interlined Gold Line routing you are really only opening up two stops to new development, basically Central and Graham. Though you are providing better connections for First Ward as well. That's for a cost of maybe 250 million or more. VS. the interlined Blue Line routing it's only 1 stop. Thats a pretty big ask for 1 or two extra stops, that only provide minor accessibility improvements. Other benefits I see: possibility of using ATC, lower vehicle Maintenace cost vs interlining with the gold line (not needing batteries), higher reliability. Downsides: lower frequency in the CBD, much higher cost, fewer stops in the CBD, not being as cost effective (which could lead to us not getting grant money and thus not being able to do the project), higher infrastructure maintenance cost. Another benefit of interlining: it still leaves open the possibility of doing the original LPA routing, or close to it anyway, at a later date. I hear you loud and clear on not wanting value engineering decreasing the project scope; but the reality is it's going to happen; it already happened with the LPA by not even considering a subway. I don't even view it as a bad thing especially when you consider that the project has on going non-supported operating costs.
    2 points
  31. I can't remember the last time I drove a car to the airport and parked it in long term parking. It's such a joy being able to just pay a couple bucks, get on a train, not have to worry about traffic delays, and have a train drop me off inside the terminal. Of course, I'm usually traveling solo and rarely need more than one suitcase.
    2 points
  32. Outside of all this, they like it. It has no chance with all this nitpicking, the height reduction is just downright hilarious. What in the world does that matter?
    2 points
  33. They do, yes. They also own the terrace place garage behind the Baker Building.
    2 points
  34. ^^^I hope they keep the classic design that is happening along West End.
    2 points
  35. A powerful blow to the Cock Block.
    2 points
  36. I would also like to point out the document was put together in May of this year and this term sheet/preliminary agreement is published in November. It's not like progress stopped for seven months, things are guaranteed to have shifted since the report was issued. As stated in the article "In addition, NASCAR it will cover any deficits in revenue to ensure bond payments are met if a race is canceled or not held for any reason." which and the lease proposal calls out that Bristol is responsible for any cost overuns of the Speedway Improvements. That report is using alot of "unknowns" language to cover itself, but also because so much of these project are unknowns and wont be known until the project is up and running. I was having a very similar conversation with a CM at the Nissan public listening session the other day. To me it sounds like they have worked out a pretty good deal - both financially and dates wise - that is pretty similar to the soccer stadium. If Nascar/BMS is on the hook for financial securities during the lease you can bet whatever body part you love the most that they will host a race during that lease. I would like to see some termination language added in (similar to the 24 month language in the Geodis Park Lease) that would cover Metro if Nascar/BMS moved away from the track again.
    2 points
  37. I wonder if CATS internal discussions are like the one we're having here. Would explain a lot lol
    2 points
  38. Demo is also a very easy box to check. Neither the 901 MLK or this site has applied for anything beyond demolition. These projects are going to take some time.
    2 points
  39. Well was up in Asheville at the Leonardo da Vinci exhibit and found his Ideal City. (and yes it relates to some ideas for I-277) (Check out the exhibit at Biltmore) His Ideal City would be built near a river and use a system of canals with a series of layers almost like the Viaducts on downtown Atlanta where the railroad is below and street level is above. So he would be in favor of flooding 277 and converting some of the larger streets in uptown to canals. (think of the tourism) https://theconversation.com/leonardo-da-vinci-designed-an-ideal-city-that-was-centuries-ahead-of-its-time-111884 ""But the true originality of Leonardo’s vision was its fusion of architecture and engineering. Leonardo made designs for extensive hydraulic plants to create artificial canals throughout the city. The canals, regulated by locks and basins, were supposed to make it easier for boats to navigate inland and transport goods. Leonardo also thought that the width of the streets ought to match the average height of the adjacent houses: a rule still followed in many contemporary cities across Italy, to allow access to sun and reduce the risk of damage from earthquakes.""
    2 points
  40. Preleasing requirements and equity contribution requirements have definitely come-up a lot in the last 6 months. I would speculate at this point, you a developer probably needs 40% pre-lease and 40% of the construction cost funded in equity. That's negotiable of course, and could depend on the strength of the tenant (i.e. Major Bank maybe 30%, while tech-firms 50%) and also amount of equity. If there was 60% equity, you might be able to go full spec. This project, with residential and hotel components, might actually be easier than straight office, as proceeds from selling development rights, or less rigorous equity requirements for the apartments/hotel can be used to partially offset the needed equity on the office portion. As far their partner Nuveen, I'm sure availability of capital isn't an issue, as they have over $100B invested in real estate, rather they have to determine if the ROI (which decreases the greater the % equity required) is worth it, and if they feel comfortable with increasing office exposure (I would assume yes, but a lot of larger real estate investment managers are re-thinking how much office they want as % of their portfolio). All that said, I suspect they have solid leads for 200k of space. Signing anchor tenants is always a chicken/egg situation. Tenants don't want to officially commit until they're sure the project will get built and deliver on time for their needs, but developers (and especially their lender) don't want to start construction until they're certain there will be committed tenants. You end up with Letter of Intent (LOI) as the compromise, where the tenant will conditionally agree to sign a lease (based on delivery date, project quality/design stipulations, etc etc) and developers will use those LOI to convince lenders/investors they have real tenant interest. All that said, there usually isn't an actual signed lease, especially during the pre-development phase, which is why you see projects rumored to have tenants in-place continue to market the space (contingency, seeing if they can get better deals, gauging demand for future projects, upsizing building, etc etc)
    2 points
  41. This tower is going to totally transform SouthEnd. According to Wall St. analysts, there are strong signs that inflation is starting to come under control. It’s entirely possible that the economy will be booming by the time that this tower opens. Bring it on!
    2 points
  42. Since the Scaleybark station is the closest to this project I will put this here. RAM Realty is buying the South End Business Park at Clanton and 77 and S Tryon. ""Florida-based Ram Realty Advisors has snagged South End Business Park, a large property in lower South End that was marketed as a "once-in-a-generation" development opportunity. Ram filed a petition today with the city of Charlotte to rezone the property from business to transit-oriented development. "We are undergoing a master plan process right now with Design Collective and LandDesign," she said. "It will be a true mixed-use (project), with office, hotel, residential, retail and green space. A big part of the conversation is going to be having great public space that is activated." The 45.7-acre, 377,152-square-foot property hit the market in late April. JLL's Patrick Nally, Hunter Barron and Alexis Kaiser brokered the sale on behalf of Atlanta-based Stockbridge Capital. Stockbridge purchased the property for $10 million in 2013, according to Mecklenburg County real estate records."" https://www.bizjournals.com/charlotte/news/2022/11/17/ram-realty-buys-south-end-business-park-cre.html I would expect big things here and they were involved in the Design Center, the Hawk tower, the Lowes tower, the Hub apartments etc.
    2 points
  43. I would like to celebrate the fact that I was banned from this website when I was 17 or 18, for suggesting that we should make 277 a river, 20 years later the spirit of that concept has had a couple million impressions on social media and is featured in glossy in Charlotte's most subscribed city magazine.
    2 points
  44. New construction pics for Prima Tower at NashvilleNowNext: https://nashvillenownext.com/2022/11/21/new-renderings-unveil-primas-distinctive-retail-paseos-in-the-nashville-gulch/#more-23302
    1 point
  45. Creating a new top for both of these high-rises since they'll be adjacent on the same block. I believe everything is getting redeveloped except for the Atrium urgent care and Richa graphics at opposite corner (but Richa might still get rolled in?) Centrum Realty - Will front South Blvd just where H&H Automotive is, with the rest of the development on the rear, vacant lot that was previously proposed to be a Courtyard by Marriott. - 37 story high-rise fronting South, midrise apartments fronting Worthington, townhouse style apartments fronting Cleveland. Retail on ground floor of Worthington side. - Has entered building permit stage. Southern Land - Replacing Tyber Creek and adjacent businesses. Historic "Leeper" store proposed to be relocated to southeast/now vacant corner of Worthington and Cleveland. - Height???? Will contain 300 units and include a spot for Tyber Creek on the ground floor. - Has requested demolition permits, and building permits. Demolition on hold for 365 days, but can be proceed sooner if approval granted for relocating Leeper store. https://southernland.com/property/dilworth-charlotte/
    1 point
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