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queensguy06

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queensguy06 last won the day on December 7 2013

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About queensguy06

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  • Birthday 03/19/1985

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  1. It's a $9 train ride....but your points are spot on lol. DIA is out in the middle of nowhere - the A line that services the airport is 23 miles long. Couple that with the terrible traffic on I-70, which is undergoing a 4 year, $10 billion upgrade. 35 min train ride vs. an hour or longer in an expensive cab/lyft and it's a no brainer. Other reasons include the number of residents in a 3 mile radius of downtown Denver (I think there is something like 3 or 4 times as many as Charlotte), and the number of origination/final destination travelers. Charlotte has a TON of connecting passengers. Back in 2016, the number of O&D flights from Charlotte was 6 million; Denver was 18.5 million. Something like 3/4 of all traffic through CLT doesn't leave the airport, whereas over half of all passengers in and out of Denver are origination or final destination. One final thing to note is that light rail is NOT conducive for airport traffic. The A line in Denver uses heavy rail commuter trains that provide overhead luggage racks and places to stack luggage that can't fit on the overhead racks. Can you imagine trying to fit a train full of people with luggage mixed with daily commuters on the current blue line in Charlotte? It just isn't feasible and would deter even more riders from using the light rail.
  2. White Point "Alternatives:" • A subterranean bus/transit center • Consolidation of the 3rd Street and Spectrum Center light rail stations into one station, updated to serve three cars • Filling in the Rail Trail gap along this Project by building an elevated Rail Trail along the Blue Line and across 4th Street • A large civic plaza as a gathering place as part of the overall master plan in concert with burying the bus/transit center • Large scale ideas such as providing an elevated connection/park connecting two blocks by “capping” 4th Street Yes, yes, yes, yes, and yes. Sigh, a boy can dream
  3. It will be interesting to see what affect the new tariffs that were imposed by the Trump administration will have on construction as they go into effect this month. I received a notification from our largest supplier that due to the tariffs, most of our metals are going up anywhere from 5% - 18% starting tomorrow. The specific field I am in is somewhat insulated, however new construction will certainly feel the hit and depending on how long the tariffs last could exacerbate a slow down in new construction. Another indicator I have been following is the slow down in all areas of commercial architecture. For the past two months this has been showing a weakening in commercial real estate demand, with inquiries for new projects at the lowest point in a decade, and overall design contracts down significantly as well. I've been saying it for several months now - a recession is coming, and I think a lot sooner than most people are expecting. Most projections have us about a year to two years out; I think by Q1 of next year we will be feeling some of the sting. The big question mark is how big of a recession is looming on the horizon.
  4. Here is a model/rendering that was attributed to the Four First Union project - never knew if it was a final design or not, but I LOVED this building:
  5. But a year ago we did not have a yield curve inversion. The yield curve had been flattening out and sloping down for more than a year, and that was one of the reasons you had some pointing to the possibility that the market was headed that direction. But for the first time, we just had three consecutive months (or 1 full quarter) of long term interest rates paying out less than short term interest rates, otherwise known as a yield curve inversion. It indicates that investors' long term view of the market is not good. And the big red flag is that the last seven recessions going back over 50 years were all preceded by a three month yield curve inversion with a following recession occurring anywhere from 9-18 months after. Obviously I'm no soothsayer, and for every economist pointing to a recession you have another touting the strength of the markets and low unemployment currently. But I personally use this metric as a cautionary point that dictates how I'm investing over the next year.
  6. Unfortunately, I don't see the convention hotel being built anytime soon. Between the current funding requests by the city/region, and several economic indicators throwing red flags about a looming recession in the next 9-18 months, this will sit in developmental hell for the foreseeable future. Any projects that haven't started construction by Q4 of this year (or early Q1 of next year potentially) I think will be victims of the turn in the economy and be shelved indefinitely.
  7. It may be a chicken and a egg thing, but to me developing Gateway first with the new train station would spur this to be higher density than its current form and potentially add interesting retail. The anecdotal evidence I point to is the redeveloped/remodeled Union Station in Denver. The development that it has spurred during and after construction is quite amazing - it was the catalyst for that area of LoDo which has turned into one of the best spots in the city.
  8. Meh....nothing about this project really grabs me. I'd almost rather this lot sit for a few years and get something that would utilize the site to its full potential.
  9. I know we're veering waaaay off topic here, but I got a good laugh when I saw Paramount Tower on that list and couldn't resist. I'll eat my shoe if that thing is ever built in its current form. This is Giarratana's Signature Tower of this cycle. I'm starting to wonder if he ever has real intentions of building one of this things, or if it's just PR for his firm. Paramount Tower has the exact same M.O. of Signature Tower of how and when he releases the proposals to the public, and they both seem to be released just after the peak of each cycle and involve complicated land swap deals.
  10. "The two companies partnered with Interbrand, a global brand consultancy, to lead in the development of the new name and brand identity,” bragged a press release from the soon-to-be-Truist banks. “The rigorous, data-driven brand development process prioritized input from BB&T associates, SunTrust teammates and clients. Through focus groups and analytical research, these stakeholders shared their expectations and aspirations for the new brand, which led to the name revealed today.” That's even worse LOL - I will say is it really that much worse than some of the other banking brands out there? I remember the first time I saw a Fifth/Third bank with a giant 5/3 logo on the branch....I thought that was the dumbest name for a bank I had ever heard. Another one in the top 15 largest U.S. banks is State Street...doesn't exactly grab me.
  11. My estimate is a best case scenario at this point based off of the most recent MTC meeting notes. The BLE was finished last year (2018), so from that time frame preliminary engineering and design to be completed by 2024, an additional two years for federal funding grant approval and final design, and two-three years of construction. This puts completion roughly in 2028-2029. But again, that is best case scenario. The silver line most certainly could be delayed beyond that.
  12. Just gonna leave Portland and SLC transit maps here for reference. I know one of Charlotte's major issues with a more aggressive rail system stems from funding due to either a general lack of interest or outright opposition by the general public in the city and surrounding area to proper tax increases/allotments. Cities like Portland, SLC, and Denver show it is not only feasible from a funding perspective, but also beneficial for area residents and businesses. I wonder if CATS could fund a transit media blitz in partnership with say the CCCP to help educate the general public on the benefits of mass transit to help push more robust funding measures and in turn a more aggressive build out plan in a shorter time frame. Even if they were able to spare <$5 million for such a campaign, it could pay dividends in the billions of dollars over the next decade in tax revenue. It just seems unfathomable to me that a city of Charlotte's size and current growth has essentially only two light rail lines with the silver line not expected to open service for at least 10 years after the blue line extension's completion, and no solid timeline for the red line or phase 3 of the gold line. Just for a quick comparison to show it can be done - Denver opened it's first 5.3 mile light rail line in 1994. In that 25 year span since, they now have 3 commuter rail lines and 9 light rail lines totaling 87.5 miles of rail service, with an additional line under construction and three extensions planned or under construction. An expectation that Charlotte could do half of that in the same time frame to me is not unreasonable.
  13. Would it be completely out of the realm of possibility to have something similar to Denver's downtown terminal at Union Station, maybe just on a smaller scale? The bus terminal is underground and feels more like an airport terminal, with glass walls separating the concourse and the bus stalls. It spans roughly 2 blocks. Also, I think it would benefit Charlotte to have most, if not all, of the multi-modal transit connectors in one location - Gateway Station. It seems odd to me you would have Amtrak, GreyHound and light rail on one side of downtown, and then a large bus facility and light rail on the other, connected only by a streetcar. In order to make mass transit appealing to people, it needs to have transit times comparable to driving a car and ease of transfers to get around town. Additionally, once the silver line is built, you could have the blue line split in two with a terminus at Gateway Station using the silver line connection from 9th Street to Gateway. This is actually not uncommon in larger transit grids - you'd essentially have 4 rail lines using the same two sets of tracks (existing blue line and silver line) and would look something like this: A Line - 485-Gateway Station B Line - Gateway Station-UNCC C Line - 485-UNCC (no stop at Gateway; continues on existing blue line route) D Line - current silver line alignment Here are some photos and video walkthrough of the bus terminal in Denver:
  14. Not a terrible building, but I do think I would like it better without the top box. I'm assuming it's for mechanical - but boy would that do wonders to the overall design.
  15. In regards to parking deck facades - sure, there is a possibility this will be a high end facade in the likes of Hearst, One Wells Fargo, Avenue, etc. But those buildings are all over 30+ stories tall. The additional building costs per square foot go up quite significantly on a much shorter building not just from the facade but the additional elements needed to build an enclosed deck that @tozmervo and @CLT-704 have mentioned. Maybe Honeywell is willing to pay that cost since they are the only tenant in this building, but it would not surprise me at all to see a deck more on par with Hyatt Place over by the Arena. It looks nice enough, but there is definitely a distinction between the garage and the hotel when looking at the building. And I worry this will only be amplified backing up to the large existing parking deck as an extension. I could be wrong - maybe @ricky_davis_fan_21 has more insight on the actual garage facade/construction?
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