Lance Winslow

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About Lance Winslow

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  1. Proposed Light Rail Systems

    This is pretty cool idea in China; http://www.washtimes.com/upi/20061204-100031-3661r.htm
  2. Welcome

    Although I am not an environmentalist, I do believe that wasting resources, inefficiency, polluting and accumulation of discarded material makes no sense at all and it takes very little brain power. Therefore I join the movement for sustainability, pollution prevention and recycling for this reason. It takes a little more effort to do the right thing and a little more intelligence to find solutions, but it is a worthy goal and one which is attainable and must be persued for the betterment of all.
  3. Proposed Light Rail Systems

    Denver's new program seems interesting and expanding. Downtown to Industrial areas and to airport. Also to Boulder and other suburbs, pretty extensive long term plan. Master Plan shows promise.
  4. Japan is neat.

    Japan's Newest Bullet Train. The Japanese not only have perfected the automobile and captured a huge chunk of the market in the US, they really know how to move people in Japan too; Perhaps you have not heard the Japanese now have a bullet train that exceeds 250 mph. The only problem is that takes a long time to slow down, so it doesn't reach Top Speed on every trip or stay at those Top Speed for very long. But its speed is what you need then this bullet train is best of breed. The previous fastest bullet trains ran at 125 miles an hour in Japan between our Osaka and Tokyo. But the French with their TGV bullet train has run at a top speed of 218 mph. But this new Japanese bullet train runs consistently at 223 mph on a daily basis with a top speed of 250 mph. Of course in Japan, you will have to slow down quick if there is an earthquake and the Japanese have already thought about that too. The bullet train has spoilers, which come out like giant Japanese fans to break the air and slow the train down as much as 10 mph per second and back down to 55 mph, when the brakes kick in hard. The nosecone of the bullet train is over 52 feet long in order to shape the airflows so they will streamline along the body at those high rates of speed. Engineers say that the bullet train is even more stable at high speed due