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rcp11889

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About rcp11889

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  1. rcp11889

    FuturEBR

    I wasn't aware that you conducted a formal study of transportation demand in South Louisiana. Anyway, I drive from BR to NOLA every week and I would love to take a train rather than pay ridiculous gas prices every week. I'm sure many others agree with me.
  2. The fact that dozens of downtown apartments have been proposed and built is a sign, for one. Also, just look at the plans for the Nicholson Corridor between LSU and Downtown...new urban living taking the place of a run-down "dangerous neighborhood". Look at the North Gate Area of LSU. It used to be HORRIBLY dangerous. Now, there are plenty of apartments and stores and restaurants with more on the way. Again, look at the fact that the Elysian has been proposed...THAT IS GENTRIFICATION. Just these in and of itself are evidence that gentrification is happening. Look at the Perkins Road Overpass Area...Rock n Sake?! I mean when did you ever expect there to be a trendy sushi place in that neighborhood or loft apartments for that matter. Or look at Mid City where there was recently an art walk showcasing the creativity of the neighborhood. If you don't see it I don't know how to help you see. But, no Prairieville and Denham will not necessarily stop growing altogether, but that typical American suburban lifestyle is dying out. And yes, trends DO come and go. That's the point we are all saying. Suburban living has been the trend for the last 50 years. We are only now in the last few years entering the "back to the city" trend, which will gain steam and probably last another 50 years. And frankly, I think you are probably comparing BR to too many other cities when we talk about urban living. No, BR will not magically become NYC or New Orleans in terms of walkability and urban living. However, BR will continue to grow in a more efficient way and produce its own urban form just as other cities across the country have been doing.
  3. Agreed. I think a lot of projects could have been built if there weren't so many hoops to jump through in that area. As itsjustme said, if there was a demand they would have already been built. The problem is that its much easier for a developer to build out on a huge piece of real estate where there will hardly be any opposition. Frankly, that is probably why the Elysian is proposed where it is, because there's not much around it.
  4. Everything you stated is not a "fact," it is merely your interpretation of the Baton Rouge market based on the people you know. I, on the other hand, know MANY recent LSU graduates who lament the fact that Baton Rouge does not provide a more urban lifestyle close to downtown with apartments like The Elysian. Consequently, they are all moving to NOLA, Dallas, or Houston. This is my point. You think you know how everyone in your subdivision likes to live and that's fine, but you must understand the potential of how much "safer" those streets will feel with big, shiny, new apartments lining them. It only takes one catalytic project to get the ball rolling. If the apartment fills up, there will be more on the way, until you reach a point where there is a huge mass of residents in the area and it is no longer a dead zone of development and suburbanites will be clamoring to visit on the weekends to get their coffee and to dine. It's called gentrification and it happens EVERYWHERE. It just takes a couple pioneers to move in and start the process. I've read several books and written a paper on this. It happens. Several neighborhoods in New Orleans used to be skid row 10-20 years ago. Now they are full of rich people and quaint renovations (see Lower Garden District, Faubourg Marigny, Oak Street). Now, before you go on and tell me how those neighborhoods in NOLA are still sketchy, you would obviously never live in those neighborhoods but clearly there is enough people for the area to be booming with restaurants, renovations, people, no crime, good schools, etc, etc. This is possible in Baton Rouge if enough people see the potential. Also, I also am not scared of walking around these so called "ghetto" areas. I've walked from Downtown on Highland to LSU before and was greeted with nothing but kindness. The people in that area might be poor but they are still good, "decent" people.
  5. You made this kind of remark in response to my post earlier...but you are forgetting that not everyone looking for a place to live has kids and needs good schools. Some young people like to live near the action so they can walk and meet people in a denser environment. That's the point of these new apartments I think. If Baton Rouge can surround Downtown with apartments and amenities, then they might have a way to attract young professionals from the next generation. That is why the city and developers are doing this; this is going to be the wave of the future and if Baton Rouge doesn't get on board, it will suffer.
  6. Not to sound rude, but that is such a typical BR attitude towards real estate development. Build new neighborhoods for the rich and let others deteriorate. When new ones get old, build even newer ones and let the others deteriorate again. This is how suburban sprawl happens and by your statement, BR will continue to sprawl until it can't support itself anymore. Revitalization of neighborhoods that are already there and built are the only way to really help BR succeed. It's happening all across the country but so many in BR are against revitalization of neighborhoods in favor of new suburbs away from the po' folk which is only to the detriment of BR. In 10 years, the great, rich neighborhoods will be deteriorating and some new place will shoot up, as has always happened in BR.
  7. I have to say that although not everyone in New Orleans feels that way about Baton Rouge, Houston, or Atlanta, MANY people really do talk like that about those cities. What I'm about to say isn't reflective of me but just things I've heard. I constantly hear from people that Baton Rouge is a "cultural wasteland," giant suburb, country town, etc. from New Orleans people. And they generally say the same of Houston or Atlanta. Coming from a city with sidewalks, real street grid, and old history, most New Orleanians do not really relate to those new cities. I once lamented the fact that Baton Rouge had no sidewalks to a friend who grew up in Baton Rouge. He immediately asked me, "they have sidewalks on every street in New Orleans???" New Orleanians come from a city with no giant highways or chains or gated subdivisions and upon entering a place with "no sense of place," they do not feel comfortable. That is not to say that all New Orleanians hate Baton Rouge. I'm from NOLA and go to LSU and love it (although I do miss home at times). Anyway, when I watch Treme and whenever they make a character say something bad about Baton Rouge, I agree that that's how a New Orleanian really would say it. Also, I went to school in Lafayette for a while after Katrina and was treated friendly for the most part. However, whenever I said how I missed my home or I said something about New Orleans, they snapped at me and called me snobby. They were very rude to me if I wanted to talk about New Orleans. Just a little side note.
  8. I recently came across a website for a condo project in the Marigny/Bywater. It's called 2212 Burgundy and the website is www.2212burgundy.com. Does anyone know any details of construction or anything? This would be awesome to have some new construction in that area.
  9. Supposedly startup companies are thriving in New Orleans. http://www.wwltv.com/video/news-index.html?nvid=304605 Also, City Park is set to have another great new landscape project start soon. http://www.nola.com/news/index.ssf/2008/11...ks_2_milli.html
  10. I saw a good report on WWL this morning about the first phase of the Reinventing The Crescent project set to start construction in 2009! http://www.wwltv.com/video/news-index.html?nvid=301747
  11. I think that Baton Rouge has more Hooter's than New Orleans because New Orleans has a much more localized economy. If Someone were to build a Hooter's on Magazine Street the residents in that neighborhood would be furious and get it kicked out. You see this with the fact that the city of New Orleans itself has no Applebee's, TGIFriday's, Chili's, Olive Garden, PF Chang's, or Outback Steakhouse, etc.
  12. Where is this new residential building on Tulane?
  13. The Louisiana Cancer Research Center set to begin construction in February. This is yet another great project adding to the health care industry in New Orleans. http://www.neworleanscitybusiness.com/UpTo...cfm?recID=15188
  14. Wow the domain co. is really working hard to transform mid-city. I really hope they continue to bring more apartments to that area. I really see mid-city becoming something great in the next couple years
  15. I found a new Warehouse District project on City Business. It seems we have more apartments coming downtown. Here's a link: http://www.neworleanscitybusiness.com/UpTo...cfm?recID=15111 I also read a couple days ago that Icinola is ready for construction soon in the Bywater.
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