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AirNostrumMAD

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Everything posted by AirNostrumMAD

  1. I had a friend who lived in 550 uptown who insisted we take light rail to SouthEnd and I swear it had to be over 30 minutes. The Uber ride back was like. 6 minutes. Anyway, the silver and blue line can always be connected by another line. They could possibly add a line (hypothetically let’s call it the green line) that follows the silver line and then merges onto the blue line tracks and follows the blue line to New Bern or Tyvola before branching off to the airport or SouthPark. That would also double the frequency in uptown & SouthEnd and would even reduce the need f
  2. Re: Long walk between Silver/Blue transfer points. Does anyone think there would be that many transfers between the blue and silver lines to begin with? wont the portion of the sliver line be near gateway station? Stations along Graham serves uptown stations well. It’s not that many blocks to tryon. Really, I would think it’s quite lazy to complain about a walk from Graham to Tryon. I think transfers would mostly be leisure outside of rush hour. And that just seems like it would take so long between the light rail speed & headways. Anyone else sort of agree? (T
  3. Agreed. I think Charlotte-Honolulu goes away once the international demand returns. Where else are they going to send these planes in the current environment.
  4. Really, the lower on this list probably the better. Give me NYC, DC, Paris, Madrid, etc. over Kansas City and other high ranking cities. I personally think these list focus on things that doesn’t fit my lifestyle or very relevant to what I value. Which is urbanity. Charlotte is one of the nicest blends of urbanity and perfect suburbs to raise families. So I wouldn’t worry about Raleigh being #3. We all know that’s not true in real life anyway.
  5. Before NC cities get high speed rail, they need to focus on walkability, mobility, mass transit, bike lanes, street calming, etc. It’s no use taking the train if you need a car to get around. The Big Bang mass transit project in Charlotte needs to happen. In addition, the city is not aggressive enough in bike lanes. Looking at Austin, TX. They have a pretty good network. Charlotte needs to do the same. And the new bike share system is a total mess.
  6. Re: CTC. The solution was to move the bus-riders away. So the current situation is just a hold-out until it could be bulldozed and built elsewhere. It seems the wiser thing to do would have been to invest money into CTC. Upgrade the station to appeal to wider swaths. Pump money into it. I am sure there are a few key routes that could work with the right frequency, reliability and a decent station terminus.
  7. Sorry to post so much consecutively, but I think your fantasy is what people like these days. And uptown definitely lacks that vibe. I think it lacks a brunch scene too which is in vogue these days. I mean. Compare Sycamore Brewery to Howl at the Moon or anywhere really in uptown. Or who would rather Brunch in uptown vs. say Optimist Hall. If uptown had developments like SouthEnd with it’s pretty great street presence, it would go a long way. Though, I don’t think any current projects with a Rail Yard like ground level is slated for uptown or would entertain a brewery, etc.
  8. I think it is change in culture. The brewery scene, etc. I don’t really recall many breweries back then - not like today. The millennials (Im one) started turning 21 and preferred the warehouse scene, breweries, food halls, more gritty settings, etc. I have nothing to back that up except anecdotal experiences. It was much more fun to go to a Food Truck rally, socialize and enjoy corn hole and stuff then it was to go to epicenter at that point. And I do remember on here, people derided SouthEnd as being nothing but bad quality stock built developments. Now, I think the s
  9. I see that. But before 2010, Romare park didn’t exist, SouthEnd wasn’t really popular yet (NoDa was), it was amazing. So it was very novel.
  10. Crazy. epicenter, or “Epic” center as some people annoyingly mistakenly called it, was the place of Charlotte for quite a many years. it’s always a place I’d take people on light rail to, get off at the nice station and head into the thriving epicenter. Go to the movies, then go to bars, head over to the bars on college, then walk to amelies, Romare. It really filled a hole. The deterioration of epicenter brings charlotte’s downtown quite a few notches from back in its heyday even despite the developments. It’s not longer a place I care that much to visit besides
  11. office towers are turning out not to be the greatest at providing anything meaningful at the street level except Starbucks. residential, it seems like retail here would struggle due to foot traffic and not the best location uptown for vehicles. Mass transit would be meh. Transferring from light rail to streetcar. If they tear down CTC that could be very promising for mass transit contributing to a robust area. I just think if epicenter is struggling and I think converting some spaces into office space... makes me a little skeptical on this being so transformative. I used to be
  12. On the bright side, I bet the overwhelming majority of users will be people transferring to other routes or light rail. So. Technically, they would have paid because transfers are free (excluding to Express buses which you have to pay a bit more) On the other hand, it allows people to transfer thrice. when I went to UNCC, I abused the system riding the Arrowood bus to Arrowood light rail & then Transferring to the North Tryon bus at CTC using my arrowood ticket to transfer. the other positive is the ones most likely to abuse it very frequently would be college students
  13. Maybe the most transformative rendering. The Amtrak will still only have relatively few frequencies to Charlotte. And the ones to Charlotte and even Washington were always less than ideal. Raleigh on the other hand seems much better served and better times. I don’t see how this could be more transformative than the Former Observer parcels with Honeywell, BofA, etc. Or light rail or even Romare Park.
  14. Looks like there is a new FAA rule that will allow airports to use PFC (passenger facility fees) funds towards mass transit. "Which (finally) brings us to the rule change issued a month ago. Under the new rule, expansions like the Silver Line would now be eligible for PFCs, typically by estimating what percentage of ridership would use the airport stop and prorating costs accordingly. Cities no longer have to choose between building a semi-useful airport connection solely for airport users or a truly useful mass transit expansion that would be much more difficult to pay for. It can
  15. It’ll be way more interesting than things in most cities in the US outside of NY & Chicago. I am not saying this is the Eiffel Tower by any means, but Parisians were horrified by the Eiffel Tower and it was said people’s favorite spot to go to was the Eiffel Tower so they wouldn’t have to see it. Hopefully from a pedestrian standpoint, it will activate the street and provide a sense of place.
  16. I get all that but we were only talking about the urban design not being great. And if it came across as anything but discussing urban design, well, oops - that wasn’t the intention.
  17. You think the Target and Wendy’s add to the urban fabric of the city and is a great walkable development and aesthetically inviting? Great walkability and interacts great with the sidewalk? I completely disagree.
  18. I think SouthEnd should get a full size Target. Maybe an entire metropolitan type development. Specifically, there is this are in Merrifield, VA I went to before. The Dunn Loring & Merrifield area reminded me of Charlotte so I go every now and then when I want a taste of home. It’s more urban than it looks (apartments, street level retail, etc) I would love a copy of that to go where that trailer park is in SouthEnd. Maybe it is too close to metropolitan. Which is a shame because I’m not the biggest fan. The only part that isn’t completely covered by p
  19. But I do disagree that Charlotte is just such a large city, the tent population just is what it is and is just a result of being a large city. And What I meant by who cares, I meant who cares enough to lose their mind whether someone considers Charlotte to be a mid-sized city or a large city (what would that make San Francisco, for example? A giant city?)
  20. Who cares? Call it what you want. That is such a minor point of what I’m even talking about. Call it the largest city in North America. I still feel the same about 277 (and Charlotte, looking out of catalyst from my fiancé’s window because he lives here) still looks the same. Nothing changed by calling it large, tiny, huge. I’m sure everyone here knows Charlotte.... in any event. There should be leadership on the homeless tent situation. I don’t buy “it is what it is”. Not at least without addressing the situation.
  21. For me, mid-sized is Charlotte, Denver, Orlando, Tampa, Baltimore, Cinnci, Austin, etc. Large being San Francisco, Chicago, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Dallas etc. It’s not scientific, just sorta my personal view. Mid-sized cities I view as major cities in any event anyway. I don’t think being a large city (or however you wanna categorize Charlotte) is really an excuse for lack of leadership in solutions for the homeless camps around 277.
  22. I disagree. Charlotte is a mid-sized city. It would be a stretch to call it a large city. cities aren’t measured in tents. Not saying bigger cities don’t have larger homeless populations. Just saying I don’t think Charlotte being a “large” city had any truth behind the tent city
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