JT Boy

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About JT Boy

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  1. West Columbia, Cayce & Downtown Lexington

    I agree Captain. I was no longer living in Columbia when Parkland Pharmacy became a Revco, but was so sad to see it change. I used to love going in there as a child. They had a huge magazine and COMIC BOOK area and I loved to spend as much time as I could hanging out there. Loved their awesome old sign as well, huge and neon, very cool. Even if it was of a chemist's beaker pouring out drugs. I was back in Cola. a few weeks ago and was disappointed, but not surprised, to see the CVS where the old HoJo's was. It is truly a very poor use of that prime spot
  2. Historic Congaree Vista Developments

    It isn't a question of whether it's a great logo or not, it's a question of whether that logo belongs on that building, and from a design standpoint it doesn't. It may be a fine logo for that company and their market (personally think the pineapple/hospitality is hackneyed and cliched, but it's not my business), and I certainly uinderstand wanting to use their logo on the building; it just makes for an unfortunate combo of styles that i think will detract from the very cool original fire department building.
  3. Historic Congaree Vista Developments

    I'm with you on your signage beef. That giant pineapple has got to go. The building really lends itself to a wonderful mid-century signage treatment. Hope that gets revised as the design moves forward...
  4. West Columbia, Cayce & Downtown Lexington

    This does seem like an incredibly foolish move on the part of the Cayce mayor and council. Who would be foolish enough to invest in these, no doubt, poorly constructed and sited housing?
  5. Main Street/CBD Developments

    THe picture is of Wisconsin Avenue in Georgetown, a few blocks north of M Street. M Street in Georgetown is pretty level, but Wisconsin climbs from the riverfront, up past the National Cathedral on its way through the city. Because U Street has undergone so much new development recently, and then struggled through construction of the Metro Green line prior to that, much of its older tree canopy has been removed, but new ones have been added and will certainly add more to that neighborhood in the coming years. Washington does have a wonderful urban tree canopy, larger in the residential areas than in the commercial areas. Apparently we used to have even more trees and the city began a major reforestation/planting initiative a few years ago. One of the things I like so much about Washington is its fabulous mix of urban and natural amenities. Three blocks from my house is a heavily forested branch of Rock Creek Park that has wonderful hiking trails. Four blocks from my house is a subway stop. It is a great way to live!
  6. Historic Congaree Vista Developments

    thanks for the online research Krazee. I believe I have stayed at the Springhill in Pittsburgh. It is a very pleasant building in a great neighborhood and adjacent to their new baseball stadium. The rooms their were huge and the staff was very friendly.
  7. Five Points

    Has someone done a mockup image showing the proposed building in current Five Points setting? That would be nice to see. The rendering was pleasant, but didn't give a sense of how this would look from a couple of blocks away, etc...
  8. Historic Congaree Vista Developments

    If I understand you correctly, then we are looking across Huger at Lady Street. If that is so, then this is not a good design, as the building turns a blank face to Huger. Ideally, the main entrance should have been right at the corner of Huger and Lady, to bring some life and color to the major intersection, with the parking lot relegated to the side of the building. From the way this rendering looks, I would suspect that parking lot and main entrance for the hotel are on the back side of the building. If that is the case, then the designers, and the city, seem to have made no efforts to changed the standard suburban parking lot-base design for this kind of hotel. That's too bad, because it seems like a real missed opportunity. The rendering image is not good quality, so I hope that I'm just misreading what is there. That being said, another hotel will add some more density and foot traffic, hopefully, to that part of town.
  9. South Carolina's population growth

    I wholeheartedly agree with your comments about folks from other parts of the country mushing NC and SC into one nebulous entity. Having lived in DC area for more than 20 years now, I constantly have people ask me about NC, and I constantly correct them that I am from SC. Must be the same situation with SD and ND I would assume. Also, Phoenix is a pit and anyone who voluntarily moves there, must be out of their gourd... I was there on business a couple of summers ago and in the 3 days that I was there, the temp never dropped below 100, even at night!
  10. Five Points

    Nice to hear the streetscaping project is wrapped up in Five Points. Looked at the special section pdf attached to the article in The State, and was really struck by how there was just acres of surface parking showing in the aerial shot of Five Points. I remember when I was growing up that Five Points seemed a very crowded and urban place, but it doesn't look that way in the aerial shot. I guess the good thing about the surface lots is that it provides room for new development and growth!
  11. Five Points

    You are right about renderings never looking quite like the finished product. In the case of First Citizens, I think that is a very handsome building designed bya major firm. This 5 Points building will be good in many ways, but its architectural design is pretty mediocre. Where it does stand out is in the mix of uses within the one building, I think that is very smart planning on the part of the developers, and will really be a positive addition to 5 Points. 5 Points has never been an architeturally distinctive area, one of its charms is its jumble of storefronts, so this building won't be a great departure from what's already there. (Does anyone else remember when the Blossom Shop was clad in those really cool shiny black ceramic tiles? Now they just have that blah fiberglass siding if memory serves.) All of the energy and excitement about urban Columbia is terrific, but I've yet to see a really outstanding, distinctive building design in all the information about upcoming projects. I would love to see a new building with a lot of panache and style in Columbia, something to really stand out from all the red brick...
  12. Five Points

    I agree with you on the design issues. While the multi-use design of the building and street front retail are to be hugely applauded, the design could be more distinctive. But overall this is great exciting news for Five Points. I'm sure the merchants aren't looking forward to more construction disruption, but the end product will make a huge positive addition to the neighborhood.
  13. West Columbia, Cayce & Downtown Lexington

    Excellent points Spartan. I completely agree about the potential for West Columbia (and for Cayce). My hope is that the city leaders don't try and compete with the fringe suburbs but take advantage of their "old school" urban grid and density, and proximity to the river and downtown Columbia. I also hope that WeCo leaders learned their lesson from the abysmal development along the Riverwalk - that thing is just an embarassing white elephant and a slap in the face to the beauty of the Riverwalk. I understand that there are plans underway to develop that big dead space between the Riverwalk park and the Meeting Street bridge. This would also be a huge boost to West Columbia's progress.
  14. Columbia Off-Topic

    Stumbled across the 2006 State and Metropolitan Data Book on the Census website. It's a huge PDF file (2006 Data Book), but filled with lots of goodies, will make for countless hours of browsing and statistics juggling. The publication covers all metro and micro areas and their county components and shows population, age, housing units, ethnicity, etc... for 1990-2000 and then 2000-2005. Fascinating to track the differences in patterns in the two decades. Most notable for Columbia area was how Richland population growth rate has increased this decade (about even with Lexington numerically) while Lexington and Kershaw have had a drop off.
  15. Five Points

    I hate to say it, because I know how frustrating parking tickets can be, but its alway easier (and cheaper) to add more money to the meter than you think you will need than to pay the parking ticket afterwards.