Hey_Hey

Members+
  • Content count

    941
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    16

Hey_Hey last won the day on September 20 2015

Hey_Hey had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

1801 Excellent

About Hey_Hey

  • Rank
    Hamlet

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Nashville, TN

Recent Profile Visitors

1706 profile views
  1. Hey_Hey

    West End/Mid Town/Music Row/Vandy Projects

    This building would have, quite literally, been in my back yard up until a couple years ago. I would often wake up when the late night staff would dump the beer bottles into the dumpsters around 2AM. I assumed that strip of business would be going eventually, and I wasn't all that keen on having an office building overlooking my back yard. That was one of the major reasons we sold our house a couple years ago. This area is really tough because single family residential is zoned directly adjacent to a higher intensity business zone. It creates a very dramatic change in use. I'm less concerned about the "heritage" being lost. Bobby's Idle Hour hasn't been there for years and years....it was in a different location until 2004.
  2. There's no question that density and height lead to a more efficient funding mechanism for infrastructure maintenance. As an example, consider 505 Church St vs my subdivision a mile south of Old Hickory Blvd in Williamson County. 505 has 543 residences in it and has ~900 feet of streets/sidewalks on its sides meaning each residence "pays for" 20 inches of roadway and sidewalks. Meanwhile, my subdivision has ~8500 feet of roadways and sidewalks (including the main frontage road), but it only has 68 houses. Each house must "pay for" 125 feet of roads and sidewalks, or 75x the amount of roads to maintain around 505. Of course, the same thing can be applied to electrical lines, sewer lines, water mains, police coverage, mosquito spraying, EMS/Fire coverage, street sweeping, and many other. Long term the costs to maintain low density housing is significantly higher than high density housing.
  3. Hey_Hey

    West End/Mid Town/Music Row/Vandy Projects

    This has been in the work for a couple years. I do wonder if the news by St Thomas drove TriStar to release information to get in the news. Work at Skyline is going to commence in a couple weeks. The floors won't be added to the tower part though. The floors will cover a huge footprint to the side of the tower. Roughly 60 new beds will be added, most of which are ICU beds to support growth in the trauma program and other critical care functions on one of the additional floors. The other additional floor will be shell space to allow for future growth. I don't know as much about the Summit addition. Also, at the base of Skyline the 6 floor (or 8 floor?) Hampton in is working on the base.
  4. Hey_Hey

    Nashville Bits and Pieces

    In a way, they have to ask for them. They have a fidiciary respndibility to their shareholders, and if they can improve profits they have the responsibility to do so. That doesn’t make these handouts right, but I think the only entity that can stop this is the federal governement.
  5. Hey_Hey

    Nashville Bits and Pieces

    I think the Bird scooters are a cool idea and could play a role in getting people around the most urban parts of Nashville. However, I think there needs to be a healthy bit of regulations in place to protect the interests of the company, customers, and bystanders. Whatever mass transit idea actually comes to fruition, we will still have the first mile/last mile problem. Something like this or bike sharing or Segways could fill that void and allow people to get to their transit stops quickly. Maybe these could be limited to bike lanes where they are available or only allow them on the north or west sidewalks along roads. Maybe there should be a company provided docking station or storage apparatus every 1/8th mile. I hate to see an idea like this just wither without giving it an appropriate chance.
  6. Hey_Hey

    The Transportation and Mass Transit Megathread

    I would say "no". At least on paper. The reality is that schools, fire protection, and police don't "make" money, but none of us can make any money without them either. So in a sense, they do make money. That being said, it needs to be reasonable. We can't bust a budget on mass transit. In my mind, it should make up a similar percentage of the budget as fire and police do and somewhere below education.
  7. Hey_Hey

    The Transportation and Mass Transit Megathread

    I would challenge you to calculate the time difference between commutes using bus or BRT arriving every 15 minutes and gondolas arriving every 30 seconds for any two points in Nashville. Put pen to paper and see where BRT is consistently the better alternative when considering cost. Take these for example: Green Hills mall, Five Points, Nashville Zoo, Metro Center, the Airport, and Maryland Farms. My suspicion is that only Maryland Farms would be faster by bus. I also suspect that the airport would be roughly break even. Everything else would favor the gondola over tradition buses for the rest by a substantial margin and would be roughly equivalent for BRT (likely slower if you didn't have to wait on the BRT to arrive and likely faster if you had to wait more than 5 minutes for the BRT to arrive). I have also ridden the #7 bus numerous times from Green Hills, through Hillsboro Village, and into downtown in both morning rush hour and evening rush hour, and I've never seen a situation in which two gondolas couldn't pick up every single patient waiting to board the bus.
  8. Hey_Hey

    The Transportation and Mass Transit Megathread

    I wasn't intending to attack you personally. I apologize. Reviewing the comments above there have been many people mention capacity, crime, safety, etc., and dismiss this idea immediately. It is clear they haven't actually looked at the numbers. In their mind this is the cable car from an amusement park, when they are actually two very different things. Many people say things like, "this is for people who don't know anything about transit." I would argue that maybe the traditional thinking about transit needs to shift. Even places that have LRT aren't seeing huge growth in ridership (Charlotte for example) despite the tremendous cost. I would agree with you that a fully utilized BRT system will have more capacity. However, are we realistically going to see even a small fraction of those numbers anywhere in Nashville during our lifetimes? Why would we use capacity as an argument when we all know that we'll never need that kind of capacity? We're currently transporting 30,000 people per day on MTA, and I would be ecstatic if we were able to eventually get that up to 100,000 people per day. Five lines of gondolas would have an hourly capacity of 6000 people per hour each way. 12,000 people per hour for 18 hours a day would give us a capacity of 216,000 people without even considering the accompanying busses. We aren't going to approach the capacity of a modern gondola system anytime soon, let along the theoretical limits of BRT. Building to enable those capacities is going to lead to a lot of extra money with no return on that money. We've tried BRT once and it failed (and I proudly supported that initiative by organizing our neighborhood to speak up for it). I suspect the state will step in and make the next proposal for Nolensville, Charlotte, or Gallatin Rd BRT fail as well. Why would we keep doing the same thing? There will have to be transit personnel at every station. I think the ADA would require that these be handicap accessible which would require some assistance for loading and unloading. A single young female walking along a transit corridor after exiting mass transit is going to be the same for BRT, LRT, or gondola. I don't see that as a reason to not do any of those things. Two good videos :
  9. Hey_Hey

    The Transportation and Mass Transit Megathread

    Capacity? Again, name a single bus line in Nashville that approaches a capacity of 1200 people per hour each way. Find me a single proposed LRT route in the transit plan that projected 1200 people per hour each way. Let's be intellectually honest and think about this before spouting off why it won't work. What is this supposed sex offender or murderer going to do when they roll up to the next station with an assaulted person or dead body lying on the floor? Just tell the transit workers to ignore it? I'm getting the sense that a lot of people simply haven't thought about this more than a cursory, "there's no way this will work." Actually dig into the numbers. Dig into the transit times. Continuous loading and nonstop service does wonders for transit times from fairly far flung locales (relatively speaking). With BRT if you just miss the bus you're looking at another 10 minutes (at the earliest) before the next bus arrives. Even if you get lucky and arrive at the station at the perfect time you'll still probably only make the trip from Green Hills to downtown five minutes quicker.
  10. Hey_Hey

    The Transportation and Mass Transit Megathread

    Check your math. 1200 people per hour per station each way (20 people/min x 60 minutes = 1200). Is there a single bus stop or proposed LRT station in the entire city projected to have that ridership? Let's not pretend we're NYC. If ridership is a concern the cars can be put much closer together. You can space them so that they arrive every 15-20 seconds if we wanted them to which raises capacity to 1800-2400 people/minute. There are also 12 passenger versions if you wanted to squeeze another 20% of capacity. Assuming there no wind, thunderstorm, extreme cold, mechanical issues. You can come up with excuses all the time. Don't people say the exact same thing about LRT? One derailment and no one will ride. If electricity goes out you'll be stuck mid-track. Gondolas have been used for decades and have an incredible safety record, and they even come with heaters (imagine that!). I would think that times of severe weather they will pull riders off in case of a tornado. Lightning should pose no threat since everything will be grounded. In terms of wind, keep in mind these have traditionally been used in mountain situations where winds will maintain speeds above 30-40 miles per hours routinely. I've loaded and unloaded on these numerous times in the past. It take roughly around 30-60 seconds per station (depending on whether it is at the end or a mid-line station. Super easy and can be handicapped accessible. Here is a video of Telluride's at one of the end stations.
  11. Hey_Hey

    The Transportation and Mass Transit Megathread

    When you actually sit down and look at the numbers, cable systems make all the sense in the world. The idea would be to use a detachable lift similar to what is used in numerous ski resorts throughout the world. The detachable lifts allow for relatively high speed along the line while slowing down at stations to allow people to get on and off easily. They cost somewhere around $6-$12 million per mile (for east of estimates we'll use $10 million per mile) and can be rapidly deployed since the footprint is so small. They provide a constant, predictable speed since there is no traffic or possibility for congestion. Current, proven, widely used technology sees them achieve ~13 mph speeds on the main lines with slowdowns at stations to allow for loading and unloading. The capacity of of similar systems can be scaled up or down depending on anticipated (or actual) usage by increasing or decreasing the number of gondolas. Each gondola would be completely enclosed from the elements and in most places would travel 30-50 feet off the ground, although they could easily go higher. They would each hold between 6-10 people and would arrive at any given station every 30-60 seconds allowing for continuous loading and unloading which frees people from having to know a schedule. For examples of these, look to: Telluride, CO - https://www.telluride.com/activities/gondola La Paz, Bolivia - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mi_Telef%C3%A9rico This is an entire system built on this idea and appears to function incredibly well. Medellin, Colombia - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metrocable_(Medell%C3%ADn) As examples of what this could offer: For a line extending from Green Hills to 5th and Broadway with a gondola every 1/8 mile along the line: -A total of 72 cars, each traveling at a constant 13mph. It would have stations at the Green Hills mall, Woodlawn & 21st, Magnolia & 21st Ave, Edgehill & 21st, 17th & Broadway, 12th & Broadway, and 5th & Broadway. The total trip length at any time of the day would be 23 minutes from Green Hills to 5th and Broad, 18 minutes from Woodlawn & 21st, 13 minutes from Magnolia & 21st (Hillsboro Village), 8 minutes from 21st & Edgehill, 4-5 minutes from Broadway & 21st, and 2-3 minutes from 12th & Broadway. With 10 passengers/vehicle it would have a capacity of ~1000 people per hour each way (2000 people per hour combined). Assuming an 18 hour schedule that would allow for a daily capacity of 36,000 people. For comparison, Nashville's MTA currently carries 30,000 people on its entire system in a day. This line would cost $45 million dollars plus land acquisition costs for the 7 stations. -For longer distances (from downtown to the airport) a system like Portland's could be utilized. It offers less frequent service but larger trams that travel 22mph. A trip from downtown to the airport along Murfreesboro Pk would take around 20 minutes regardless of time of day or traffic. The cost would likely be more expensive on a per mile basis. -From 5th and Broad, lines could be built to 5 Points (10-12 minute travel time), Charlotte & 46th Ave N (22-24 minute travel time), Harding Place and Nolensville (35 minute travel time), Dickerson & Briley (33 minute travel time), DB Todd & Buchanon (18 minute travel time). -A central hub could also be envisioned which allows for transfers to different lines. Alternatively, a cross town connector could allow for transfers. It is true that this solution doesn't allow for commuters from Franklin or Hendersonville to come into the city. However, for the city itself, I would contend that it provides all the capacity we would need for decades to come at a fraction of the cost of our last plan. It would also be an iconic addition to the city. Can you imagine the branding opportunities Nashville would have with a system of 6 interconnecting lines? While top speeds are not impressive, it doesn't have to stop for traffic, red lights, pedestrians, or accidents. Sometimes slow and steady wins the race. I would love to see a full proposal offered up.
  12. Hey_Hey

    The Transportation and Mass Transit Megathread

    The gondola idea is something I have been dreaming of for the last six years and I have spoken with him about this previously. The numbers work when you actually have an open mind about them. I’ll post more later. Dismissing this ideas outright is really shortsighted. It does take out of the box thinking though.
  13. Hey_Hey

    Nashville International Airport

    I have mixed emotions on the prices, currently. On one hand, I wish the prices were less expensive so that more people could utilize the flights. On the other hand, however, I am glad that they are expensive because that indicates demand is strong. I guess in the end I would rather have high prices at this point than low prices. That being said, my wife and I were able to book BNA-LHR-DUB for later this summer on World Traveller Plus for ~$1250 round trip. That seems to be reasonable. It has been interesting to see that connections through LHR are cheaper than if LHR is the destination. I don't know enough about the industry to figure out why or if that is a good or bad thing. I believe the 787-8 has to take off on the crosswind 31/13 as well. They did last night, and I believe I read somewhere that they have to use that runway for take off. They can use the 2/20 runways for landing since they have burned off the fuel.
  14. Just to play devil's advocate for a bit, I would add that many of the people relocating may not be looking for another urban residence. I would suspect that the people who choose to move to Nashville from NYC may be the very people who aren't looking for an urban residence. They may view this as their time to get a house with a yard. Anecdotally, I am friends with an executive at UBS. He was located in their Manhattan office but chose to move here as a way to get out of the city and live a more "traditional" life.
  15. Hey_Hey

    Nashville International Airport

    Check out Flightradar24.com sometime after 9:00 or 10:00 PM and watch the flow of Fedex planes into MEM. It is amazing to see that many wide bodies going into one airport. Nothing like it elsewhere in the US.