lammius

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About lammius

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  • Birthday 08/31/82

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    MalcomJ757
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    lammius
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    Jersey City, NJ

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  1. EVMS Education Building

    Sorry I didn't get to this sooner. Work has been trying its best to kill me. Here's what I've got on the Fort Norfolk developments. I took quite a few liberties on site plan/dimensions, but hopefully these massings give an idea what the area might look like in years to come. I didn't include the "possible new building" at Front Street Flats because there are no known specs. But, we have River Tower, Beau Rivage, CHKD, EVMS, and Tarrants Bay shown. Here we go: 1. From the Brambleton Ave bridge, heading west: 2. Eastbound Brambleton Avenue at "the bend" 3. Southbound Colley Avenue at Brambleton 4. From the Berkley Bridge (I had to draw in the Hilton too) 5. From Crawford Parkway in Portsmouth 6. From Hospital Point in Portsmouth 7. From West Norfolk Bridge 8. From the Hampton Blvd bridge over Lafayette River 9. From the WAVY TV 10 Tower Cam
  2. EVMS Education Building

    Ok with that rendering I now understand where this is going exactly. The other rendering was/is hot, but I wasn't sure exactly where it was. I haven't been to that part of Norfolk in a few years. So this, river tower, Toronto bay, what else is going in this area? I've lost track (a good problem to have in Norfolk)!! Ill sketch something up tonight or tomorrow night.
  3. Norfolk Light Rail and Transit

    The Tide crosses Boush at Bute Street. So this branch would take a lane of Boush from that point north. There are 6 lanes of traffic plus a bit of median on the block between Bute and Brambleton, then 4 lanes north of that (which I don't think are used to capacity by autos). On Llewellyn, yeah it would stink to lose the median or the bike lanes, but it's one of the only north-south thoroughfares in that part of Norfolk that has enough space between the curbs to make this thing fit along with a couple of traffic lanes. It's wider than the southern end of Hampton Blvd or Monticello, and carries less traffic (I presume). The 21st Street businesses can consider whether any loss of pass-by traffic is made up for by foot traffic coming from a LRT station or two in their district. Poor Portsmouth. Or Poortsmouth.
  4. Norfolk Light Rail and Transit

    There's no obvious solution to the west side problem, other than tunneling. Maybe you could have a branch break off the Tide line onto Boush Street, reconfigure Llewellyn Ave to have a LRT lane, traffic lane, and possibly remove the center island to accommodate the bike lanes too, in each direction. Then turn 21st and 22nd Streets into one-way pairs with a traffic lane and LRT over to Colley, use that wider part of Colley going north to accommodate LRT with a lane of traffic each way, and then use 26/27th Sts or find a way to meander it up to Monarch Way (do away with the on-street parking) before merging into Hampton Blvd for the run up to the Base. As for Chesapeake, yes, it may have 250,000 people sometime soon, but spread over 300 sq miles, there's as much corn as people. Unless Chesapeake is interested in densifying along a LRT corridor and focusing future growth there, it would be really hard to justify any form of rail transit out there. Maybe just as a park and ride setup to start?
  5. Waterside District

    Are three-martini lunches not a thing with the business crowd anymore?
  6. Norfolk Light Rail and Transit

    I thought this study was started in 2015?? If they haven't even selected the alignment yet, it absolutely will be ten years. The starter line was easy, as most of it was existing ROW, and only downtown was hard. The Westside Connection (please let them call it that) will be much more difficult. Most, if not all, of it will be in-street. There's a lot of traffic impact analysis that has to happen, environmental, community engagement, demonstrating to residents that the catenary wire won't give the kids cancer, etc.
  7. Norfolk Pictures

    Took a quick trip to Tidewater just before Christmas. Here's a pic of the Norfolk skyline taken from the Renaissance Portsmouth hotel
  8. Hilton Norfolk at The Main

    The chieftains who lain at the Main, shall dine mainly at Grain.
  9. River Tower

    I got you. I took a shot at it (I had to do a little homework, since I'm not as familiar with Richmond or what's going on there). Check it out: First one is free
  10. Richmond Developments

    You guys' friend blopp1234 stopped by the Norfolk forum and asked me to mock up a massing of a few of the new additions to Richmond's skyline in Google Earth. First, I took a look at the development map and found two projects that are likely to have a real impact on the skyline. In the case of the Dominion Energy building, the height is known (413 feet), so I used that height for the building on the parcel on 6th Street. I wasn't sure, based on the development map, but is the second tower supposed to be on the spot where an existing tower sits? I assumed so, so I didn't draw the second tower, as the existing tower covers it. Second, I added the locks building. The height was not stated, but at 21 floors of mixed-use, I assumed a height of 280 feet. If its height is known to be more or less, let me know and I can change it. If there are any major projects I missed, or if I got the details on these two wrong, let me know. I just need the location, height, approximate width/dimensions, and I can plop a box on the map. Please enjoy this look at Richmond's future! 1. From a bridge. See the gray, faceless boxes representing the new buildings. 2. From another bridge! See 'em on the left? 3. From a highway. The Dominion Energy building dominates this view: 4. And finally, the sexy helicopter flyover:
  11. River Tower

    At vdogg's request, here are some google earth captures with a massing that approximates the River Tower included. This gives an idea of what impact River Tower will have on the city's skyline. The pics below capture a few common skyline viewing angles. Note, I added a box representing the Hilton as well. 1. Helicopter view over EVMS. 2. Helicopter view over the Berkley Bridge (think of the old WAVY TV news opens) 3. View from the Berkley Bridge 4. View from I-264 westbound near Exit 9 5. WAVY TV 10 Tower Cam view
  12. Gateway Towers???

    So I massed a pair of 500-foot towers, approx 130' in width, and plopped them down near the City Hall LRT station. I just threw two towers onto the spot, without trying to match the site plan dimensions, just to see what they'd look like on the Norfolk skyline. I'd say they dominate the skyline. From I-264 WB approaching CIty Hall Ave exit: From the Berkley Bridge: From the top of the old Radisson: From Brambleton Av near the Hague: From Crawford Pkwy in Portsmouth: From the WAVY TV 10 Tower Cam: And the view from the roof, looking down on the rest of downtown Norfolk:
  13. Waterside Tower

    Jobs first, then apartments.
  14. Waterside Tower

    I agree with that philosophy, but a more practical objection could be a potential lawsuit by anyone opposed to the project. You could argue that creating a separate parcel and zoning that parcel alone for residential, while the adjacent parcels remain public/entertainment/whatever equates to "spot-zoning." Such a challenge may not win, but the city could prefer to not even invite it, nor the lasting ire of Marriott, Hilton, and Norfolk Southern.
  15. The Icon at CityWalk Progress

    I think you're seeing that in a lot of cities. Strictly-defined "financial districts" are becoming home to more mixed-use. The lower Manhattan financial district is seeing a boom in condo, rental, hotel buildings. Same in Los Angeles, same in a lot of cities across the country. Honestly, a strictly "financial district" of office buildings becomes a dead zone after 6pm (see Boston or Houston). Mixing in some housing, restaurant, entertainment keeps the place alive around the clock. Drunks in the street are a price paid for that kind of lively 24-hr downtown economy, and your police help manage that. Norfolk can do a lot to densify its downtown before expanding the footprint. That massive vacant lot at St Pauls/City Hall, the massive "third anchor" spot at MacMall, the ATM drive-thru "park" in front of BOA, those ugly parking decks along Plume Street, that 3-story "city center" building on City Hall + Maritime Association, that weird area along E Freemason/Bank where "houses" were built in the middle of downtown, the Waterside parking deck, a lot of spaces could be developed or redeveloped to increase the density of population and workers to a point that they support supermarkets and businesses that cater to a neighborhood population. You could add millions of square feet of office or housing in those spots alone. And tons of "under the radar" spots could be redeveloped. Like the post office at Plume/Atlantic. A 5-story glass building would do wonders for that spot. And let's not forget that malls tend to have a 30-40 year lifespan, and MacMall is about halfway through that cycle. What happens when it's time to redevelop that? If the surrounding downtown is dense enough and development pressure is great enough, you could see that mega-parcel carved up into 9-12 city blocks containing skyscrapers. Reintroducing a street grid to the center of downtown would help tremendously with traffic and ease a bit of the burden on St. Pauls, IMO.