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Griz83

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Everything posted by Griz83

  1. That's the John Sevier building. Just underwent an extensive renovation.
  2. Rae's has THE best sandwiches and soups downtown. There, fixed that for you.
  3. I took about a 2-month break from the forum a while back and had 6 or 7 pages of unread posts when I came back.
  4. Interesting contrast in styles in that last photo! Classic urban, '80s brutalism, modern glass.
  5. That was my first thought. If it requires a big rebuild, it seems it'd be cheaper to just level the thing and start from scratch.
  6. I'm pleasantly surprised at how nice this one is turning out.
  7. Without actually doing some 3D surface-hydro modeling, it's hard to say exactly. But suffice to say, the water would've been significantly higher and moving faster. Anything close to the river would've sustained more damage than it did. If I recall, the work had been completed on Wolf Creek by that time. I was at the Wolf Creek Dam in 2006 or 2007, while studying Geology at TTU and the work was mostly completed then.
  8. I assume everyone knows that the "500 year flood" actually has a 1:500 chance of happening every year. The 2010 flood was actually quite controlled, compared to what it would've been otherwise. The Corps did all they could given the information they had at the time. If I recall, the rain event was record-breaking by a long shot, but the actual flood which ensued was not. The much-derided photos and videos of the flood gates at Old Hickory Dam wide open actually saved the city. The dam itself was within mere feet of overtopping, and washing out the earthen portion of the dam. Had this happened, the entirety of Old Hickory Lake would've dumped onto the already swollen river. Should they have brought down the lake levels prior to the rain? Sure, but the forecast called for nothing like what we ended up having. By the time the rain got here and the forecasts were updated, it was dumping so much on us so quickly that it was too late to change the lake levels. Did they handle it perfectly? Of course not, but no one can predict the future. Now back to your regularly scheduled topic...
  9. You can try their new (still working out the bugs) data site: https://data.census.gov I was at a conference just last week at the new Libscomb Spark Center. Someone from US Census gave us the rundown on it. Enjoy.
  10. Ah yes, the old Cotton Eyed Joe...
  11. When I lived in Cookeville for 6 years, I always used to say that the town slogan should be "It's all good in Algood!" Glad to see that this "essentially-a-Cookeville-neighborhood" is catching on. As an aside, Dogwood park is quite nice, too.
  12. Is this real, or just a hypothetical rendering for a contest?
  13. I feel you on that. I grew up obsessing over maps - I had a WWII map satchel that I found at a surplus store, and I filled it with maps from everywhere my family went. I also grew up just down the road from Old Hickory in Hermitage, and Don's post is accurate. Company town. Here's more info: http://www.oldhickory.org/aboutvillage.html I took my love of maps a step further, and now have a career in GIS!
  14. It's a 1972 Pearson 33. There was a Chris Craft 26 at HIYC for a long time though. https://sailboatdata.com/sailboat/pearson-33
  15. Any time. Not to hijack the thread....but this was from yesterday around 5:30, sailing right past where Don's photo was taken (his location would've been about 1/4 mile off to the left). Our little guy was wanting to take the helm for the first time. Haha...
  16. Then yes! Just a few hundred yards down the road, our boat is at Harbor Island Yacht Club!
  17. If you're where I think you are, my boat is right on the other side of that island!
  18. That ticks me off to no end. That place is a lot of fun, a great place to take the kids, and won't break the bank. It's one of the few things of the like which remain in Mt. Juliet. The roller rink was taken from us years ago, and now this? For more townhomes? There's so much empty land to build on!
  19. You are correct. I was remembering data from Clarksville, at 65 feet during the 1937 flood. I had looked it up many years ago. Found it again to confirm: https://www.weather.gov/ohx/calendar Too many numbers, not enough space in my head. Thanks for correcting! Still, Corps did a good job in 2010!
  20. That is a big misnomer. A "100 year flood" simply means a flooding event that has a 1% chance of happening each year. FEMA is attempting to phase out the "x year flood" event titles. However, it will take a while for that terminology to exit popular culture. Interestingly, if I recall correctly, the 2010 flood was by far the highest rainfall amount in 1 day, highest rainfall amount over 2 days, and highest rainfall in one month (May 2010). However, during the record-holding "Great Flood" in 1937 the Cumberland was 14 FEET higher! I make a big deal about that because people gave the Corps of Engineers crap over the flooding that occurred in 2010. If the dams and reservoirs hadn't been put in place and managed adequately, think about how much higher the flood would've been. The 1927 photo above shows the river around 4.5 feet higher than in 2010, and from a much smaller rain event.
  21. It is quite amazing that all of this is going on in Cookeville. That doesn't even count the flurry of construction going on at the TTU campus! Still no Target, though. I guess they... ....... .........missed.
  22. I would assume it's some sort of UV coating or film on the windows that makes the blue sky appear more violet. It could also be a photographic color-balancing issue. The former is probably more likely since the adjacent building's reflections appear more blue.
  23. There are stories of servicemen in Western Europe during WWII picking up the Opry on 650 (there was only AM band then) "when the weather was just right." AM signal can travel an enormous distance. Regardless, the vets in WWII could hear it on the Armed Forces Radio Service.
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