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Spartan

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Everything posted by Spartan

  1. 1) The legacy union side facing Tryon is pretty crappy too. That large building at Hill/Tryon has exactly ZERO doors that open on to the sidewalk. Fortunately its glass so its salvageable... but I'm cautiously skeptical about the remainder of the block until I see evidence not to be. 2)I walk through the Church St quite a bit, and IMO the issue there isn't the "ugliness" - businesses in parking decks are doing pretty well just a block or two away. The problem, IMO is the block between 1st and Stonewall (along the Mint and old Duke HQ) are completely dead and hopeless, so there's no retail energy to connect the two. Once the Duke building is replaced, it will (presumably) have retail facing Church, which should in turn help draw people further up the street. 3) IMO unless there's mostly private funding for a cap, I just don't see it happening over the Belk. I think there's a stronger argument for the one proposed along the silver line crossing of Brookshire because it aligns with other capital projects, incentivizing new development, and there's a better equity argument for that type of investment.
  2. Would love to see a brewery in that space. It's already set up for that type of operation.
  3. Now that this is real I'm making this its own thread. There's an article in the HJ that talks about it. It's behind the paywall, but I can confirm there's no new info. If you read the Spartanburg section of UP then you're likely to be more well informed than the average HJ reader. https://www.goupstate.com/story/news/local/2022/05/02/what-know-spartanburg-sc-government-building-projects-municipal-courthouse-police-fire/9558839002/
  4. Wasn't this originally supposed to be a crapload of new retail? Surprised the existing deck wasn't built to accommodate the entire block.
  5. That spot needs to be a public park
  6. 6800 people in the course of a year is not an insignificant number. Greenville's growth also includes some high quality urban stuff in the city, which Horry doesn't have. I still think Horry has a de facto carrying capacity due to people only willing to live so far from the beach... but admittedly, I don't understand why people want to live there in the first place. No offense to people from that area haha.
  7. IMO, the best strategy is to invest in yourself as a city. Make it a great place to live for residents and the businesses we should want to attract will want to come here because of it. The Dan Trail is a great example of that. Turning old 85 into a tree-lined boulevard would be a good investment too. Honestly, lining more streets with trees like on Milliken's campus would be a good idea across the board.
  8. It's definitely needed, and it will set the city up for potentially funding the projects identified during the process. My hope is that the City wants to figure out what to do about Church Street between Wofford and Henry St.
  9. Yeah it would, wouldn't it I guess its been a few years since I've done anything with this. I'll try to get it up to speed soon. If y'all want to help make this happen quicker, please drop a post or two in here with the developments and key details that need adding. I think I can work out which ones have been completed and need to be removed/archived.
  10. I love that podcast. Always interesting and informative.
  11. It's too bad B&N is closing, but I'm not surprised. I went in there over the holidays and it had way fewer books and way more gifts (aka: junk) than it used to. Definitely used to go hang out at that Starbucks with friends back in the day when it was the only coffee place in town. (RIP Java Jive) That said, I would much rather Hub City Books stay a float than a chain store. This burger place is a great example of how the City is great at attracting businesses to reuse these vacant commercial buildings.
  12. I've read through it (well, skimmed) but its a solid plan. Very well done on pretty much every level.
  13. IMO that is a great idea. But people freaked about about a $25 annual fee, so I'm skeptical.
  14. Thanks for sharing this. My gut reaction is mixed and probably more negative than not. The fact that we're seeing this kind of investment is very exciting, and I love that aspect of it. But I have never been a big fan of modern/contemporary looks; I don't think they age well and you often end up with a design that feels awkward and detracts from the built environment. The large facades here look cartoonish and are not to scale with the adjacent facades. It looks like something you'd see in a zany theme park in Orlando or in a 1990s shopping mall, not in a downtown setting. I'm not a fan of the tower architecture at all. It looks uninspired and out of character for the one contiguous historic block we have in town. The buildings themselves look remind me of some of the mid-century modern buildings in Columbia. On the positive side, I love the activation on Broad Street. Big fan of that. I also like to density numbers and the immediate injection of life into that block of Main Street. The other VERY positive intangible aspect of this is that it speaks to the momentum in Spartanburg these days. No other city in South Carolina is getting development like this outside of Greenville, Cola, and Charleston. This is certainly next level for us and if it's successful it changes the conversation. If not then, well, we've lost half of our historic building stock, our only contiguous historic block, and any semblance of character east of Church Street.
  15. Wow, I wasn't expecting that level of detail. Good for Una/Saxon. I agree that New Cut Rd should be the priority, but only if they make the sidewalk twice as wide under the bridge. The only way these could happen is if the County forks over a lot of $$. Alternatively SPATS could add them to their planning list, but its hard to say how high of a priority funding would be relative to other projects in the area. Still, you gotta start somewhere.
  16. The irony is had it not been delayed in the first place due to lack of funding then could have advanced a few years a go at a much lower cost.
  17. This is a really phenomenal project. What a great way to use that space and FINALLY fill in that vacant parcel while preserving the facade! I think if you live in the heart of downtown you have to know it isn't going to be the same as living in the country. I'd love to know what the 1BR units will go for. Probably not cheap with a $10m investment.
  18. The Wakefields are good Spartans, IMO, but I doubt they will sell the car dealership. I hope Brawley Street gets reconnected, and I hope they will buy out that one sad little house back there and find those folks a better spot in town.
  19. To be honest, there aren't really a lot of good solutions to East Main. The area with the most congestion (in Hillcrest) is all suburban shopping centers with relatively few shared driveway connections, so the problem is more of bad land planning than it is transportation, specifically. Ideally you'd have a continuation of the rear entrance to Hillcrest Shopping Center through the old movie theater, across Greenlawn Cemetery, and around to the back side of Walmart and maybe to Webber Rd. Do that, and connect all of those currently disconnected parcels, then you could really make a difference on East Main. The area between Church and Fernwood/Drayton is a tougher nut to crack. You can use Heywood as a bypass for part of it, but since you have Converse Heights and the college on either side, there aren't any good ways to get a parallel street network through there. Maybe build an extension of Daniel Morgan north of Converse and around to Heywood? I dunno. We could also extend Isom St to Memorial Drive by using the topo change to go under the tracks. That neighborhood that was back there seems to be entirely gone, so the only challenge is the topic change. None of these options are slam dunks, and all are expensive and might take some legislative support to build. The only way to justify the cost would be if it costs less than widening 2 miles of East Main. The alternative of widening East Main is painful to think about unless in includes a substantial widening with wide share use paths on both sides and generous planted medians to allow for large trees to grow and pedestrians to cross the street.
  20. Breaking News: Truist is going to purchase naming rights for the Riverside tower. Insider scoop of the signage and lighting plan below:
  21. Seems like facing NE would also set the skyline (such as it can be seen from down there) in the outfield. Plus it could create a barrier from the railroad tracks. I'm not convinced Spartanburg can support a minor league team. Aren't there locational restrictions with other MiLB teams too? I feel like soccer would be a solid investment. Less common, less rules on establishing teams.
  22. Just moving this to its own thread. IMO basically anything interesting in or near downtown should have its own thread. So, a second QT would not, but a cool renovation or new building that adds to the built environment does.
  23. Its 26k, while St John has about 15k, so most of the traffic is local (which is what you'd expect). For comparison, WO Ezell has about 35k east of Blackstock. To be honest I'm not really concerned about a widening happening, but the good thing is if there are ever rumblings about it we'll know a very long time in advance.
  24. Yep. Baxter St and Pearl Park were considered Brooklyn. Pearl Park was Brooklyn's park and has ties to the now displaced community. It's one of the few pieces that is still intact.
  25. I think the question is, what are the objectives of widening the road and could that money be better invested in other transportation infrastructure. Maybe widening Heywood/Skylyn or creating a new connection to extend Isom to Church Street somehow? Just brain storming. I realize there's a college and railroads in the way. I do think SCDOT will eventually want to widen East Main Street, and I hope when that day comes that Spartanburg will lobby for a true complete street design, because 6 lanes + a turn lane would be terrible for the built environment.
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