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pgsinger

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About pgsinger

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    Charlotte, NC

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  1. Depends on the condo docs. In the Midwest and on the West coast, it is pretty common to have a provision allowing a super majority of condo owners force a sale of the remaining units. It is admittedly less common in the South, but I am sure it exists.
  2. Because the stated goal on TBC's site is, "increasing tunneling speed and dropping costs by a factor of 10 or more..." Admittedly, I am making an assumption based on that stated goal. They have been awarded one contract - Las Vegas. They have been awarded the right to negotiate on a contract with Chicago and explore a tunnel between DC and NYC. Their method of execution of these projects is completely unknown to all. I would bet they will bring in third parties to manage some of the other details beyond boring the tunnel. To my knowledge the extent of Tesla's vertical integration is unknown. It has been reported that Tesla makes significantly more of their parts than traditional US auto companies, but that is not hard to believe given the lack of vertical integration in US auto manufacturing. All we really know is they produce their own batteries, motors, and drive train. Tesla's vertical integration for batteries was the result of a need. They had to build the Gigafactory to get battery production and storage to an economic scale. Literally, this is life or death for Tesla. The Solar City acquisition is not a step in vertical integration because Tesla's don't have solar panels. It was at worst a nepotistic favor to his cousins and at best an attempt to use the Tesla brand to drive a secondary stream of revenue to help float the vehicle production and add to the demand for the Powerwall which further helps lower the cost of batteries. I have no insight into the percentage of part in their cars that they make, but I bet it is fairly low. I have no idea how much of a SpaceX vehicle is made by in house versus outsourced. Sorry to all for continuing to be off topic...
  3. So, I think you and I actually share a similar viewpoint on Musk, TBC, Tesla, etc., but here you go: 1) Fully autonomous driving capabilities was originally promised by summer of 2016. It has not yet been delivered. 2) Solar roofing options at a viable scale was promised by 2018. It has not yet been delivered at scale (I could be wrong but I understand there are less than 100 Tesla solar roofs in existence.) 3) Production of Model 3 cars exceeding 5k per week. They hit this but have not routinely achieved it. Current production scale is roughly 4,500 per week, so they are close. 4) Powerwall life expectancy in excess of 10,000 cycles. Promised 2-3 years ago. Powerwall 2 still has a life expectancy of about 10k cycles. These are the ones I remember off the top of my head but there are literally dozens more. In fact his success rate is probably <30%. There is literally a tracker if you want to see all the undelivered promises: https://www.bloomberg.com/features/elon-musk-goals/ That said, I am not a Musk hater. These goals are exceptionally hard to achieve. If you are not striving for something you will never achieve anything. People attribute way too much to TBC because of Musk's inventive and optimistic views. All they want to do is tunnel well. They are leaving it up to other people to figure out how to maximize those tunnels. The elevators, autonomous vehicles, pods, etc., are just Musk hypothesizing what can be done with those tunnels. They will not be TBC projects. TBC will bore the tunnel, and leave it to someone else to handle.
  4. The Boring Company is simply trying to spur R&D where there has been no R&D in 50+ years and capitalize on it. It is not primarily a tech a company. They are using very basic concepts to increase efficiency and reduce costs. Some of this is no possible due to technology (autonomous vehicles, continuous structural support installation, electric boring machines, etc.). It is completely un-sexy which is why the name is so perfect. They have no intention of building a two lane (same direction or two direction) tunnel because of the cost implications. Think about this small fact that no one seemed to realize until TBC. The formula for the volume of a cylinder is V=(pie)r(squared)h (I do not know how to get the appropriate symbols in this text box). A two lane 28 feet wide 100 feet long tunnel has ~61,575 cubic feet of volume. A one lane 14 feet wide 100 feet long tunnel has ~15,394 cubic feet of volume. That is 4x the volume, which is likely 3-4x the cost. So why build one tunnel with 4x the volume when two tunnels totaling half the volume are sufficient? It is exceptionally basic ideas like this that The Boring Company is trying to exploit to lower costs of tunneling. And yes, in typical Musk fashion, their existing goals are probably more aspirational than attainable. To have 4k cars pass through one tunnel every hour would require more than one car launched per second.
  5. While I think it would be great to see this redeveloped into more buildings, etc., I would support this becoming a park. Let Tepper have the old Beazer land, but convert the rest to a park.
  6. This is so wrong it cannot go ignored... No, if I am a plaintiff's attorney, I do everything to avoid federal court. This is Fed Pro 101.
  7. A tower came down at the project behind Ruth's Chris, so we are minus one crane this month.
  8. So EVEN Hotel will no longer be a modular project... They had to go back to the drawing board. I am sure others on this board are more connected than me so maybe they can share a bit more. I have already said too much...
  9. Any idea when Barry's is opening?
  10. Haha...the entertainment district! A mini-Vegas. Great for day drinking but the crazies come out at night.
  11. Could we run a line along 485 from the Silver Line to P-Ville and connect with the Blue Line (post-extension to P-Ville)? Pick up 2-3 stops in River District, which is a large area anyways, 1 stop at the outlets, then continue it to Ballantyne. Running North it could use the same track as the Silver Line and end at the airport. This would give South Charlotte convenient airport access. It could probably get close enough that the USNWC could run a shuttle from the stop at the silver line junction. I am a huge proponent of running the line to the airport. However, since tourism is not a huge industry here, I assume most passengers going to and from the airport are leaving from or going to their residences. Similarly, I think most tourist are visiting friends and relatives here, and going to their residences. I actually think an airport line to residential heavy air of town might do better than a airport line to the CBD.
  12. They waited to drop the lines around DFA until it was completed, so I think we can hold out hope.
  13. Yeah, Driven is a great company. We did a bunch of work with them when I was with VEREIT. They bought all the Lube Stops from Argonne and rebranded them to Take 5. This was within the last 18-24 months, right? I thought they were previously in the building over Hickory Tavern in Midtown.
  14. Awful coloring. White on White is a horrible decision. https://www.suncountry.com/Explore/Travel-Destinations.html
  15. I agree on poor connectivity planning. I disagree on the rest. Spurs have worked well in a number of cities. Agreed, and STL whose second line is effectively a spur off the first. Also look at DC which has several lines that pair up for periods then split towards the end of the line (Orange & Silver, Silver, Blue & Orange, Blue & Yellow). They do not appear like spurs on the map but functionally, they are. Agreed...but that doesn't mean the planning should not be done now in connection with land taking and zoning. I know this is wishful thinking, but fully and firmly committing to an overall plan would help tremendously in numerous aspects. Ugh...I agree.
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