CenterHill

Members+
  • Content count

    1530
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    17

CenterHill last won the day on May 5 2016

CenterHill had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

2222 Excellent

About CenterHill

  • Rank
    Burg

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Nashville

Recent Profile Visitors

1608 profile views
  1. Ha, didn't notice that. The Post author has now made the correction.
  2. From the Post Gulch site eyed for tower now set for smaller building Kelty, Houston entity slate project on Division property previously slated for Crescendo authors Staff Reports Nashville-based developer and real estate investor Travis Kelty is preparing to break ground in the first quarter of 2018 on a six-story $50 apartment building project on the Division Street site in The Gulch and on which high-rise Crescendo had been planned. Kelty said Highpoint Division Partners GP, for which he serves as co-partner with Joe Porter, has signed a partnership agreement with Houston-based Guefen Development to co-develop the site, which has an address of 641 Division St. Terms of the agreement are not being disclosed. This will be Guefen’s first project in Nashville, Kelty said. The 210-unit building likely will be six stories above grade, with one level of below-grade parking, two levels of above-grade parking and four levels of apartments, Kelty said. The project is expected to be finished in the fourth quarter of 2019. http://www.nashvillepost.com/business/development/article/20972805/gulch-site-eyed-for-tower-now-set-for-smaller-building
  3. Can't wait to see how this turns out. Such a gem of a building.
  4. The BWSC parking deck has a certain 1965 vibe to it. I wish someone would offer a workshop on Aesthetic Parking Garage Design 101. All local developers would be required to attend.
  5. um, that would sound creepy in any other context.... LOL
  6. I'd say a good number of those Lower Broad buildings are still standing between the river and 5th. The building I'd most like to see undergo a thorough and loving restoration is the Cotton Eyed Joe building (far right in the picture and in the link FMDJ posted) at the foot of 2nd/Broadway. Much of the front facade has been altered over the years with windows removed and bricked in. It could be such a grand statement on Lower Broad, but it would probably require a change of ownership to someone with the right mindset who wouldn't pull a Trail West middle of the night demolition to avoid the complexities of working with an historic structure.
  7. ^ This building on 3rd is undergoing a major renovation. Can someone remind me what is going in there (not sure what Black Rabbit is)? It looks like the construction may include some Bankers Alley activation. Hope that's the case.
  8. Methinks you are on to something. The cars got much smaller in the after image, too. LOL.
  9. ^ Thanks. This was announced some time ago and I've been looking for some sign that the existing occupant of the property, January Environmental, an oil and waste recycling company, was in the process of vacating, but as recently as Tuesday I ran by there and the business still appears to be in operation. Given the current use of the property, I would expect there may be some level of environmental remediation required before the new owner could obtain building permits. Just speculating on that. A prudent buyer would conduct a Phase I environmental survey before acquiring the property, so maybe they have and determined an October ground breaking is feasible. We'll see.
  10. I agree with you about the charm of Germantown. Fortunately, Germantown is covered by an Historic Preservation Overlay, which limits the ability to modify historic structures. You're right about the pace of redevelopment, which is even more pronounced in Salemtown, which is covered by a less restrictive Conservation Overlay. However, there are (or I should say were, because they are disappearing at a rapid rate) numerous houses in Salemtown that would not be considered historic or contributing and are thus subject to being replaced with new construction as long as the new construction fits within the zoning guidelines. Unfortunately for both neighborhoods, fewer and fewer neighbors actually live there. A large number of the houses have been purchased by investors and converted to short-term rentals.
  11. Ooh, I hope you're right. Delta partners with KLM, so the Amsterdam connection would open up access to Europe, Africa and beyond. Couple that with AA and BA and we are suddenly not so "land locked".
  12. AirBnb's economy.
  13. That's what I suspected. I think the only reason "articles" like this get written in the first place is when a realtor with listings in a particular neighborhood calls the paper and suggests it. Funny/sad that the Tennessean writers will just print anything without questioning whether there's actually a neighborhood in Nashville called "City Heights." Long live McKissack Park!
  14. The Sunday Tennessean yesterday did a feature on the "City Heights" neighborhood. The name threw me and the label doesn't appear to have made it to Google Maps yet. It's basically the neighborhood north of Charlotte and bisected by Clifton Ave near Pearl-Cohn. I'm curious where the name comes from. http://www.tennessean.com/picture-gallery/money/2017/08/01/nashvilles-city-heights-a-neighborhood-on-the-rise/104213720/