Vrtigo

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Vrtigo last won the day on February 17 2016

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About Vrtigo

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    Burg
  • Birthday May 30

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    Highland Heights, East Nashville, TN

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  1. Except for the neutered crown, the end result is remarkably similar to what was promised. I'm really not sure what there is to complain about here.
  2. ^ What was its purpose before being offices? (Please don't say "baggage". ) p.s. Nice cameo in that last one, @markhollin!
  3. ^ I'm surprised it's taken this long! Mr. Choice (or whoever owns that parcel) is making a handsome premium on that sale.
  4. Vrtigo

    Nashville Public Art

    Was wondering about this myself... The one on the right was struck by an automobile several months ago which trashed the marble cladding. I wonder if they uncovered more structural issues which necessitated a rebuild, or if they are doing away with them entirely?
  5. Vrtigo

    The Gulch Projects

    ^ With those "in-house DJs", it sounds like you'll still be doing plenty of shaking!
  6. Vrtigo

    The Transportation and Mass Transit Megathread

    I love the idea of flying transportation as much as anybody. The hurdle I can't figure out how to get over is the noise and enormous amount of air that has to move to get anything off the ground. Whether you've launched a drone firsthand, taken a ride in a helicopter, or just seen a lot of flying on TV, it's plain to see how much disruption these things would cause (especially at takeoff and landing) to the quality of life and pedestrian experience we're all advocating for. As much as I'd love to see it, the simple physics of the matter make drone transportation seem just as unlikely right now as a fully autonomous car.
  7. Vrtigo

    The Transportation and Mass Transit Megathread

    Majority tourist scooter usage may very likely be true in certain areas of the city, but I doubt that's the case across all of downtown. I subjectively tend to think of single riders as more likely to be locals, and the groups of 3+ are visiting. My office looks out over the Demonbreun Street viaduct and there is regular, consistent traffic throughout the day of singles and pairs, with a natural increase in groups during events and weekends, but most of the daytime scooter traffic very much appears to be locals.
  8. Vrtigo

    Nashville Bits and Pieces

    (I assume you're referring to this year.) They've been setting things up at the park for about two weeks now, so definitely not a last minute decision.
  9. ^ A site plan is available through the Nashville Development Tracker website. I happened to stumble upon it yesterday:
  10. @nativetenn I would say please do, but permission is not mine to give! I myself borrowed it from the Knoxville History Project. (There are a few more good ones on that page. )
  11. Vrtigo

    The Transportation and Mass Transit Megathread

    I can't blame them! Charging the things makes a lot of sense when they are already parked right outside your front door.
  12. I apparently struck a chord with my mention of Market Square. I should add that I was born in and spent over twenty years in Knoxville and have some personal experience with the matter. In no way do I mean to imply that Church Street Park in its current state has any reason to be compared to Market Square. My point is that Market Square provides a fine example of the potential for what this park could become, albeit on a smaller scale. Together with a pedestrian promenade along ADD Blvd., Nashville could have its own gem to be proud of. My comparison to Market Square largely hinges on the assumption that ADD Blvd. also receives its fair share of attention. It has huge potential to be lined with street activation exactly as NCDC suggests. I believe that the current lack of any such activation is largely due to the negative appeal of the park in its current state, but removing the park entirely is an overly extreme solution to that problem. How does any urban park succeed, given the plethora of churches, public restrooms, and other services that meet the needs of the homeless population in any modern city around the world? Surely we are not the only ones that happen to have a park close to a library with a few churches nearby. Others manage to make it work...why can't we? I disagree with anyone who says these problems are unique to Nashville and impossible to solve, or that things are too far gone when we have people and dollars pouring into Nashville right now. Granted we do not have several blocks worth of space to work with, but we could easily have our own L-shaped miniature version if the desire was there. Market Square in the 60's was a giant car park with open streets lining each side, yet somehow that problem was solved in its own time. Similarly, Knoxville had its own share of blank walls and boarded-up storefronts for many years, but they solved that one too. Our blank wall can and should be opened up with cafe seating exactly as shown in the image below, and closing off ADD Blvd. would provide some much-needed isolation from the intrusion of vehicular traffic. You (@nashville_bound) mention sinking too much money into our park and that nothing has worked. Can you give me some recent examples? I'm not being argumentative--I'm honestly curious, because I am not aware of anything that has been done in recent time. I'm also not saying this would be easy, but we can't get this park back once we build over it. Quite simply, this whole initiative to me smacks far too much of every other "Urban Renewal" project across our city over the past 50 years--most of which have been lamented ad nauseam for their short-sightedness in posts by our own members in this very community.
  13. Vrtigo

    CBD/SoBro/RutledgeHill/Rolling Mill Hill Projects

    ^ RE: China construction Probably had something to do with how much steel comes from China and how the tarrifs are ensuring that we can't buy enough of it to keep up with our own demands.