metal93

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About metal93

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  1. That can work for some stretches of Semoran, the ROW's wide enough to do it without too much demolition to nearby structures. I would imagine that all the interchanges would be single-point urban interchanges, those seem to take up the least space. I don't drive in that area often but it's pretty bad when I do, yet my least favorite part of Semoran is between 434 and 17-92, especially near the Altamonte Mall and I have to drive there frequently. But what I really want to see is Maitland Boulevard/414 completely grade separated. I-4 Ultimate would partially do this, but it would be nice to have the ride from 441 to 17-92 without traffic lights, plus it's not too difficult seeing that the 414 is already somewhat limited access, is highway-like, and has plenty of ROW. I-4 Ultimate is elevating and removing the traffic lights on 414 at Maitland Summit, Keller, Lake Destiny, and the lights to the I-4 ramps. In the end, there will only be 5 traffic lights on the 414, and out of those, Maitland Avenue being the only major at-grade intersection.
  2. For right now it's the Orlando City supporter commons area (basically tailgating), and a farmer's market should be starting up sometime in the future, if not already. I wouldn't know as I haven't been there in a while. That area can serve as a sort of park space that replaces the one that was were the western half of the stadium now stands. As long as the church remains, I don't really think it's practical to build anything there at the moment. Despite the many empty lots, Parramore has very little park space and I think that's a good place to set aside for park space that would serve both Central and Church street "sports/entertainment corridor."
  3. I wonder if that works for the Sentinel too. Their site kept insisting I had an adblocker on, even after I turned it off and turned off the anti-banner features on my antivirus program. Same for its sister site Sun Sentinel. Turns out it was a pop-up blocking feature on my Firefox browser that caused this, because the Sentinel likes to use really intrusive ads.
  4. I don't mind paying a little for parking as long as it's easy to access. The city's made some moves with the smart meters but I think more can be done - maybe increase the availability of on-street parking while encouraging the phasing out of surface lots. That being said, I generally avoid paying for parking if I'm not in a hurry to get somewhere, plus it's not too difficult to find free parking if you know where to look and are prepared to walk a bit and maybe take a LYMMO bus to get there.
  5. I disagree, maybe the entire eastern half can be a dog park but the reason many of us were against making the whole place into a dog park was out of preservation of the beautiful old oak trees in the middle and towards the western half of the park. I can only see dogs and owners alike ruining those trees and destroying those low hanging branches, and can imagine that someone or their dog would get hurt and lawsuits would arise. Probably.
  6. A Target Express might work as Creative Village goes up. Not sure if Target would consider building a new one as they already have a store in SoDo, two miles away from downtown plus current trends of online shopping haven't been too good to traditional retail giants like Wal-Mart and Target. Time will tell though. It'd be awesome if Orlando was able to get one of those Amazon Go stores, I think the only one so far has opened in Seattle.
  7. Good points. I find issue with hypocritical people that say "let the private sector do it" but then turn against it and cry to their government to do something when the private sector actually does it. You can't have your cake and eat it. There might just be powerful lobbying groups associated with automobile manufacturers and oil companies pushing a massive campaign against high speed rail, similar to the one that killed passenger rail in the US decades ago. I've seen fearmongering about increased noise levels, lowered property values, increase of train accidents, passing on costs to the local government and taxpayers, and even blatantly false claims that it would be bad for the environment. I think its just pure NIMBYism for many people, they simply don't want to see new development and more traffic in their quiet little community. There is probably only one or two legitimate reasons why someone would oppose Brightline - there are a lot of retirees in little communities along the coasts and I can understand the concerns that Brightline could fuel development of luxury condos and price them out of their homes and community, doubly so especially since Brightline's parent company FEC has shown interest in developing their property along the stations. Having said this, I'm in full support of Brightline and can't wait for it to reach Orlando. I'm going to have to disagree with federally funded/operated rail though. Though I was rooting for HSR to Tampa and was upset when Governor Scott killed it, maybe in hindsight it wasn't that bad now that I'm seeing how CAHSR in California is playing out with its massive cost overruns and general government inefficiency, even though I'm still opposed to toll lanes and would have preferred rail in the median of I-4. Our own Amtrak, the laughingstock of national railways in the developed world, is considering privatization, and it may be for the better too. I do very much like how the Japanese do rail, and would like to see at least some sort of emulation in the US in my lifetime, and their railways are privatized.
  8. I always knew there weren't many gas stations around Downtown, but didn't realize it was that little. If one were to draw a box bounded by Colonial, Gore, JYP, and Bumby, these are the edges where the first gas stations around downtown start popping up, further within that, there are no gas stations.
  9. It would be great if there was light rail consisting of 2 lines - the proposed line between I-Drive and the airport, and an additional line that goes right into downtown, mostly running alongside I-4. That would be nice instead of the proposal of taking SunRail to Sand Lake and switching trains. Imagine a one-seat ride to the tourist attractions without transfers and without getting stuck in I-4 traffic like the Lynx buses do. The benefit would be that since it can be a separate line from SunRail, it could have greater frequencies, run later in the nights, and most importantly - run on the weekends. Additionally it can reach destinations that the former maglev proposal wouldn't have gone to, such as the north I-Drive, the premium outlets, Universal Studios, and the Mall at Millennia. Having a light rail line that hits all these points, going from downtown Orlando to Disney Springs (hopefully) would be a total game changer.
  10. Just what we need in such a prime location, water retention! I'm no civil engineer but that interchange they have planned for 535 looks like it could have been done better and more space efficient, but FDOT appears to be bent on making roads into quasi-highways.
  11. How many people do you suppose try this? This could be hurting ridership numbers and revenue if enough people are doing it, I'm assuming ridership is counted by number of tickets scanned.
  12. Parramore will ultimately be gentrified the way I see things going. Aside from Creative Village, highrise development in Parramore looks like it is going to be concentrated along Church and Central.
  13. Agreed with JFW657, keep the high rise development on 17-92 if it happens. I'm down for more development in Winter Park but I'd rather not see anything over 4 floors in the vicinity of Park Ave. Nothing 1 floor either, 2-3 floors is perfect. I like the lowrise nature of Winter Park and would rather see it kept that way and any new skyscrapers in downtown Orlando where there is plenty of space. The remaining parking lots around town look like good spaces for infill. In particular I'd like to see maybe two 3-floor mixed-use apartment buildings replace the 7-11 and International Diamond Center on Park and Fairbanks, the two current buildings don't really frame the southern entry in downtown Winter Park or continue the streetscape that well, and taller buildings are more appropriate on larger roads like Fairbanks.
  14. That sounds like the "Phase 2" of I-4 Ultimate - extend the toll lanes to Disney and beyond, with direct ramps into an extension of Hotel Plaza Blvd where Crossroads currently exists. It makes sense, but it would have many issues. I don't really see the reasoning of tearing down all of Crossroads though unless something better was built in its place. I imagine the standalone restaurants would stay though. Also I don't know if it's Disney's influence preventing this, but there should be more I-4 ramps at Central Florida Parkway, Daryl Carter/Fenton, and right at the entrance of the Premium Outlets - aside from Disney a huge amount of traffic is heading here. The current setup of funneling all the traffic in this area onto Apopka Vineland is just too congested.
  15. Construction update on the OIA south terminal and intermodal complex: http://www.bizjournals.com/orlando/news/2017/02/14/touring-oias-new-intermodal-complex-photos.html The whole complex should be completed by 2020 according to the article. I was hoping the Brightline and SunRail would match the opening but it looks like that isn't happening. I'm not sure at this point if either Brightline or Sunrail would get to OIA first, and it probably won't be another 5-10 years after that before the I-Drive light rail happens. It's starting to look like the worst case scenario is being realized: the south terminal and intermodal facility will open without any rail service, only the people mover.