asthasr

Members+
  • Content count

    304
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

304 Excellent

About asthasr

  • Rank
    Whistle-Stop

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male

Recent Profile Visitors

2124 profile views
  1. asthasr

    Learning from Other Places

    I saw this rebuild on ArchDaily and couldn't help but compare it to some of the uninspired/ugly EIFS things we get. It's hard for me to imagine how this type of structural concrete and wood building could be any more expensive to build, and yet it's far more interesting looking. I'd love to have a building or two in Charlotte in this style. Edit: And another example, this one in Japan. (Although I'll note Tokyo has worse electrical wires than Charlotte!)
  2. asthasr

    Legacy Union (former Charlotte Observer redevelopment)

    It's sad to me because this is most likely the most significant uptown tower of this cycle, in my opinion, and there are some truly breathtaking towers being built in this era... Chaoyang Park Plaza, Marina One, Lotte World Tower, Beijing Greenland, Guangzhou CTF, Mahanakhon. Of course we're not as big/significant as those cities, but at least they could've looked around to see what's being built instead of just taking a Ballantyne building and cloning it a few times vertically.
  3. asthasr

    Perception of Charlotte Nationwide

    Yep, I know. My post was mainly about the "never having the chance" phrase. There are a lot of people who will never want to partake of our fair city, no matter what amenities are on offer, simply because it's different than their previous experience.
  4. asthasr

    Perception of Charlotte Nationwide

    I grew up in the foothills and I can say that it goes beyond just "never having the chance." The feeling, a lot of the time, is that Charlotte/other urban areas are not available to them. They simply won't go. I've still got friends from my hometown who will talk about how they can't find a job, and I will tell them, you know, Charlotte's right there, they could come and find something. "But it's so far," etc. It's 45 minutes or an hour -- a bad commute, yes, but not insurmountable. You could make it work! But it's as if we have a wall around the county in some peoples' minds. (Also weird are the "Oh, I've been to Charlotte, I didn't like it" people who, it turns out, drove by the city on 85.)
  5. asthasr

    SouthEnd Midrise Projects

    Wait time at Pineville (which is 200+ beds as well) is 5+ hours. They process you in quickly and then sit you down in the waiting room to suffer.
  6. asthasr

    SouthEnd Midrise Projects

    They need to upgrade Pineville. Badly. Wait times at the ER there are many hours long and they are at capacity in terms of beds.
  7. asthasr

    Learning from Other Places

    @KJHburg The one thing I don't like about Durham's downtown is that they still haven't gotten rid of the one-way race track that rings the center. People fly on those two-lane one-ways. It's a menace to pedestrians.
  8. asthasr

    Learning from Other Places

    Here's an article from Singapore that, frankly, could be written about Charlotte: "If this is Home, Truly it Should Look like Home," from the Straits Times. Granted, the architectural heritage isn't the same as our architectural heritage, but the issue is essentially the same: disregard for the past and its sacrifice on the altar of development.
  9. asthasr

    Learning from Other Places

    I think it would be cool if we could get lights like this, rather than just the color-changing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PnwKo0LWO5s
  10. asthasr

    509 South Tryon | Possible Duke Energy Tower

    <blink></blink>
  11. asthasr

    Learning from Other Places

    A friend mentioned this movie to me, and I find it interesting, although it's probably dry unless you care about urban design (nobody like that on UP, right?): The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces
  12. asthasr

    Learning from Other Places

    I found this really interesting: The World Bank "Sustainable Cities" project is using bike share data to refine TOD standards. This is important because a lot of TOD theorizing is just that: theorizing. The new dockless bike shares are giving a lot more data on how people use urban space. I was also surprised to see separated bike lanes mentioned; I don't know that much about mainland China, but the requisite traffic enforcement is not present in Southeast Asia, and I'd sort of assumed it would be similar.
  13. asthasr

    Legacy Union (former Charlotte Observer redevelopment)

    Maybe that's the wrong term to use. It's just mismatched with its facade--the facade is a lot taller than the back, and the back is pretty utilitarian and "square." I haven't been inside, so perhaps the interior is nice. I just tend to compare to Catholic churches, since that's where my wife goes, and so my taste tends to run more towards things like St. Mary's in Wilmington and St. Leo's in Winston-Salem.
  14. asthasr

    Learning from Other Places

    I agree with that, @cjd5050. In keeping with the theme of the thread, I think you can see an example of prioritizing TOD over connecting commuters in the NoVA area, where Arlington has already been converted into a pretty high-density second city for the DC metro and Tyson's Corner is beginning to show signs of life around its stations. There are still nits to pick--particularly in Tysons--but the extension of Metro out to that point has really made a big difference. It's gotten to the point now that Arlington actually has one of my favorite skylines in the country, purely because of its density around its metro stations; if you haven't been there, I recommend driving from DC into Arlington via the Roosevelt bridge at night. From the air, you can easily see how the TOD clusters around the Metro stations. I think the Wilkinson corridor could easily be similar.
  15. asthasr

    Legacy Union (former Charlotte Observer redevelopment)

    Not really. Behind the giant, weird facade it's just a big box like a Lowe's or something. It's weirdly hilarious.