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asthasr

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About asthasr

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  1. Why does England have so many problems with their high rises? I've never heard of a "deadly down-draft" anywhere else.
  2. "Why is Japanese zoning more liberal than U.S. zoning?" is an excellent piece that elaborates on an older blog post that I believe I've previously posted here.
  3. I recently had a significant layover in O'Hare after a trip to Southeast Asia and was reminded, once more, of how terrible American airports are at food. Our dining options in the concourse for our flight back home were Chili's Too, McDonald's, a sports bar, takeaway (Chicago-style) pizza, and a bunch of convenience store-type places. This is pretty typical of American airports, I think. Now, compare that to Changi, Incheon, or Hong Kong. Part of this is that those airports are either newer or have been significantly renovated so that their layouts are more sensible than the older American airports; but wouldn't it be fantastic if Charlotte-Douglas could make a name for itself by delivering a dining experience that could compete with those international airports?
  4. Not an unfair comparison, but Carolina Place isn't dead yet, might get a light rail stop before it is, and is (frankly) in a much better location with easy access to 485 and 77.
  5. JAL already has a nearby flight, IAD-NRT. I'll actually be on that Wednesday. That's why I said non-alliance would be the only chance; those top tier, partnered Asian airlines all already have name brand cities (IAD, JFK, ORD) as destinations. All in all it was a roundabout way to say that I don't think it will happen.
  6. To be frank I'm not sure that we can really expect anything else, unless a non-alliance Asian airline wanted to open an east coast route and found Charlotte cost effective. I can't even imagine who that would be, though. ANA, Air China, and Singapore Airlines are in Star with AA, Cathay and JAL are in oneworld, and China Airlines is in SkyTeam... come on VietJet, I guess?
  7. Downtown Pineville is basically nothing, anyway. It'd be great to see it incorporated in a genuine urban district, but ultimately it's about twenty small downtown buildings that cover a footprint equivalent to two moderately sized modern "megablock" buildings. Carolina Place has more potential as a development parcel and may even be a walkable urban node in the future.
  8. Saw this on Twitter and couldn't resist sharing it here.
  9. Why do people besides car drivers feel that they deserve a piece of the street? The street is just for moving cars and trucks as quickly as possible. Anything else is communism.
  10. It's inevitable, when the lower level teams are treated as simple feeders for the major league team. What baseball needs is promotion/relegation. It'd actually help all of our major leagues (except the NFL) in terms of quality and probably fan involvement -- but you'll never see it because we'd rather have legally protected monopolies.
  11. I'd love to be able to spend some significant time there. I think there's a lot that can be learned from their patterns that hasn't really been studied yet; for example, their urban farms in the "suburbs," their extremely narrow streets in residential areas, their "good enough" infrastructure that saves on maintenance costs, and their ad hoc urban green space.
  12. I had the "opportunity" to witness a Charlotte special: someone running a red light and ramming into someone trying to turn left. Just fantastic. Sure am glad nobody in our fair city stops for red lights!
  13. This is an interesting project in Singapore, the "Tree House."
  14. The vast majority of "Silicon Valley" is suburbia taken to its logical extreme. If you haven't been there, I posted somewhere in this thread about it. Most of the area is cheek-to-jowl single family homes and single use zoning, of course with no meaningful transit, punctuated by a large-scale grid of four to six lane "arterial" roads that connect, in turn, to controlled access freeways: Checking Zillow quickly, most of the estimated home prices in this area seem to be around $2 million. One is for rent: This palatial 4 BR, 1500 sq. ft. house is listed as renting for $4300 a month.
  15. I do too. However, given our population growth, this is the better option in my opinion. Warehouses and other businesses that require external mobility should be on the edge of the city, that's their function. The areas closer to the dense core (and I'm not that familiar with Statesville but I note that it's within 2.5 miles of Trade & Tryon as far up as Atando) should encourage people to live within it. That way they can live in townhouses, duplexes, condos, or apartments and use something other than a car to get to their jobs. To me, this seems more like "traditional" development than the sprawl that we've built to this point. On the contrary, I think that unbounded accommodation of traffic backfires. For one thing, maintenance comes due, and we have some vast amount of infrastructural maintenance that will never be funded. Development sprawls out infinitely, until a tipping point occurs where traffic is so bad that even temporary band-aids are no longer available, and the city starts to choke on it. (Look at Los Angeles and Atlanta.) Transportation is a hard problem: there is no solution that is going to make it possible for everyone to be happy. But there's value in recognizing that a simple status quo approach simply cannot work (once again, LA and Atlanta), so new approaches need to be investigated and tried.
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