Jump to content

QCxpat

Supporting Member
  • Posts

    1435
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    6

Everything posted by QCxpat

  1. Incorporated as "Charlotte Town" on November 7, 1768, the Queen City crosses a historic milestone in 2018 -- the 250th Anniversary of her founding. Happy 2018 and Happy 250th Anniversary, Charlotte! Links: http://www.cmhpf.org/educhargrowth.htm (The Growth of Charlotte: A History by Dr. Thomas W. Hanchett, The Courthouse Village, 1760s - 1800s) http://www.cmstory.org/timeline (History Timeline -- The Charlotte Mecklenburg Story, 1768 - Charlotte Incorporated)
  2. The US Census Bureau just released the 2017 State Population estimates as of 07/01/2017. North Carolina's 2017 est. pop. was 10,273,419. NC's numerical increase from 2016 - 2017 was 116,730. NC's pop. increased by 737,698 from 2010 to 2017 (7.7% change). State Rank: 9th largest state. South Carolina's 2017 est. pop. was 5,024,369. SC's numerical increase from 2016 - 2017 was 64,547. SC's pop. increased by 398,988 from 2010 to 2017 (8.6% change). State Rank: 23rd largest state. US Census Bureau Data Links: https://www.census.gov/data/datasets/2017/demo/popest/nation-total.html https://www.census.gov/newsroom/press-releases/2017/estimates-idaho.html
  3. Link to Story in The New York Times, December 17, 2017 (Top Stories): https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/17/sports/football/panthers-nfl-jerry-richardson-owner.html Panthers estimated to be worth $2.3 Billion. Excerpt from The Times article below: "The sale of the Panthers will be the first of an N.F.L. team since 2014. The Buffalo Bills were the last team to be sold, after their founding owner, Ralph Wilson died. The team went for a $1.4 billion, a record at the time for an N.F.L. team. The Panthers are likely to sell for far more. The team owns its own stadium, has been more successful on the field, has a dynamic quarterback in his prime in Newton, and plays in a larger and faster-growing market. The league has also grown significantly since 2014. According to Forbes, the Panthers are worth $2.3 billion." "By offering to sell the team, Richardson has saved the N.F.L. from a potential confrontation and an investigation that could have damaged the league’s image at a time of heightened anger over sexual harassment. Under the league’s constitution, owners can lose their clubs for acts “detrimental to the league.” Still, it’s somewhat surprising that the N.F.L. — known for its deliberate approach to any major change — and Richardson reacted so quickly and so dramatically to allegations of workplace misconduct."
  4. On 11/28/2017 @Phillydog posted: "So you're insisting Charlotte can't grow past Jacksonville, FL, Columbus, OH, Indianapolis, IN and San Francisco? Um, ok." In this connection, there's an illuminating prior post dated 05/22/2014 written by @rjp212 who projected the dates when Charlotte was likely to pass Columbus, Indianapolis, Jacksonville, and San Francisco. Here is what @rjp212 said on the Charlotte Area Population (Coffeehouse) thread: Charlotte Population Growth: Charlotte added more residents between 06/30/2015 and 07/01/2016 than all but 10 cities in the country according to US Census estimates. Charlotte gained 15,656 residents, and Charlotte's growth rate was 1.9% from 06/30/2015 to 07/01/2016. See link at: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/local/article152427944.html -- "Robust Growth Continues for Most - but not all- Places in Charlotte Region," The Charlotte Observer, by Adam Bell, May 25, 2017. According to many economists, by the year 2025, it’s projected that the Charlotte area will be home to over 2.8 million residents, 18% more than current population estimates. Charlotte's estimated metro area pop. in 2014 was 2,380,314, with a projected metro area pop. in 2025 of 2,819,071, or an increase of 438,762 and representing an 18.4% increase in Charlotte's metro area pop. from 2014 to 2025. Mecklenburg County's 2014 population was 1,012,539, with a projected county pop. in 2025 of 1,252,058, or an increase of 239,519 representing a 23.7% increase in Mecklenburg County's pop. from 2014 to 2025. See link at: http://www.charlottestories.com/heres-what-charlotte-will-look-like-in-2025/ -- "What will Charlotte look like in 2025?" Charlotte is currently the third fastest-growing major U.S. city. If its population growth continues, Charlotte's population is set to surge by 47% from 2010 to 2030, growing from 1.87 million to about 2.74 million in just twenty years. Much of the growth in the region is due to foreign immigration as well as return migration to the South for the lower cost of living. See link at: https://www.lawnstarter.com/charlotte-nc-lawn-care/what-will-charlotte-look-like-2025 However, note the variation in Charlotte's annual growth rates between 2010-11 (growth rate of 3.36%) and 2015-16 (growth rate of 1.89% on a larger base). Year Population Growth Growth Rate 2016 842,051 15,656 1.89% 2015 826,395 18,033 2.23% 2014 808,362 15,456 1.95% 2013 792,906 18,353 2.37% 2012 774,553 18,545 2.45% 2011 756,008 24,584 3.36% 2010 731,424 190,596 35.24% 2000 540,828 144,894 36.60% 1990 395,934 80,460 25.50% 1980 315,474 74,054 30.67% 1970 241,420 39,856 19.77% 1960 201,564 67,522 50.37% 1950 134,042 33,143 32.85% 1940 100,899 18,224 22.04% 1930 82,675 36,337 78.42% 1920 46,338 12,324 36.23% 1910 34,014 15,923 88.02% 1900 18,091 6,534 56.54% 1890 11,557 4,463 62.91% 1880 7,094 2,621 58.60% 1870 4,473 2,173 94.48% 1860 2,300 1,200 109.09% 1850 1,100 0.00% Source: Riction
  5. I wouldn't put my bet on Boston for HQ2. Boston fumbled its bid for the 2024 summer Olympics. There are many social justice organizations in Boston that definitely don't want Amazon's HQ2 to come to the Boston area, thereby contributing to (i) the exorbitant price of housing, (ii) income inequality, (iii) more displacement / gentrification, and (iv) burdening an aging and decrepit mass transit system that completely broke down 2 winters ago (Feb. 2015) during epic snow and ice storms. Charlotte will do just fine whether or not she lands HQ2.
  6. In addition to Seattle's location on a narrow isthmus between Puget Sound and Lake Washington, Seattle is much denser than Charlotte. Seattle covers a land area of 83.87 sq. mi. / 217.2 sq. km; had a BOC est. pop. of 704,362 as of 07/01/16; and has a pop. density of 8,398 sq. mi. / 3,242 sq. km. Charlotte covers a land area of 305.1 sq. mi. / 790.2 sq. km.; had a BOC est. pop. of 842.051 as of 07/01/16; and has a pop. density of 2,761 sq. mi. / 1,092 sq. km. As the NY Times story notes, "For Seattle, Amazon has become far more than a big employer and taxpayer. It reshaped how the city sees itself and, in turn, is seen by the world." It has been said that "Charlotte's greatest struggle is with its own identity. The city remains tied to its roots as a giant of finance and transportation, but has diversified as it has grown. The rapid growth of the late-20th century led to the unfortunate demolition of much of the city's historical infrastructure, giving Uptown a glittering feeling of newness despite its 250-year history. ... Heavy growth in the past 20 years has made Charlotte one of the South's largest and most successful cities. In many ways, the city is still trying to catch up to its own growth. Visitors often comment that it seems understated in terms of culture and development. However, it is changing at a breathtaking speed." See link at: https://en.wikivoyage.org/wiki/Charlotte#Q16565 If Charlotte wins the competition for HQ2, the breathtaking changes over the past quarter century will probably accelerate to warp speed and the evolution of Charlotte's identity along with it.
  7. New York Times, "5 Lessons Seattle Can Teach Other Cities About Amazon," by Kirk Johnson, November 16, 2017. Link: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/16/us/amazon-seattle-headquarters.html Amazon employees spend time with their dogs in a 17th-floor dog park on the company’s campus in Seattle.CreditRuth Fremson/The New York Times 5 Lessons: (1) History and Geography matter. "For Seattle, Amazon has become far more than a big employer and taxpayer; it reshaped how the city sees itself and, in turn, is seen by the world." ... "Seattle hit a sweet spot with the company's rise, Professor Fred H. Smith (a professor of urban economic history at Davidson College in N.C.) said, as Amazon tapped into an existing rich pool of talent and resources, from the University of Washington's strengths in computer science to cheap electricity from the Pacific Northwest's connections to hydro-power dams in the Columbia River basin." (2) Amazon will not be a predictable engine of change. "What you get now will probably not be what Amazon becomes." Josh Simms, chief exec. of H5 Data Centers said, "Amazon brought a lot of young, smart people into Seattle so now all the big tech companies feel they need to be there as well." ... "One of the companies new office buildings will have a shelter for 200 homeless women, children and families built into the tower itself - the first such design in the world, company officials said." (3) Amazon will magnify a city's charms and its warts. "Amazon is simultaneously one of the most loved and most hated of organizations." ... "In Seattle, the company's growth became the catalyst for forces of anti-growth as housing prices soared and traffic worsened." ... "Defenders of the company's impact said the huge and expensive expansion of mass transit that is underway now might not have happened if a sudden worsening of traffic had not underscored the need." (4) New employees will not be like the old ones. "Here in Seattle ... about 8,000 new apartments are under construction within walking distance of the Amazon campus and are expected to be taken mostly by employees. About 20 % of the company's 40,000 workers already do not take any motorized transportation at all -- they walk or bike. And more than one in six live and work in the same ZIP code." (5) New problems won't be like the old ones, either. "Seattle has outpaced every other big city in the nation in the rate of wage increases over the last decade, according to figures from Payscale. But thousands of people have also come seeking opportunity, with many falling through the cracks. Over 11,000 people were homeless in King County on a one-night count this year. Home prices continued their dizzying upward spiral in 2017, nearly twice as fast as the second fastest appreciating big city." N.B.: I know, TL;DR
  8. At a single view and in one masterful stroke, @ricky_davis_fan_21 has imagined what Lewis Mumford so eloquently attested to: "Men come together in the city to live; they remain there in order to live the good life." "It is not for nothing that the building stones of the universe are the durable elements...." "The translation of ideas into common habits and customs, of personal choices and designs into urban structures, is one of the prime functions of the city." "What makes the city in fact one is the common interest in justice and the common aim, that of pursuing the good life." "....the city's main function (is) the enlargement in human consciousness of the drama of life itself, through whose enactment existence discloses fresh meanings." Source: Mumford, Lewis, The City in History, @1961.
  9. See link below to story from The New York Times, November 7, 2017, "Elections Roundup" https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/07/us/mayor-atlanta-boston-detroit.html?_r=0 Vi Lyles Will Be First Black Woman to Lead Charlotte, N.C. Vi Lyles, a Democratic councilwoman, was elected mayor of Charlotte, N.C., on Tuesday, local election authorities reported, becoming the first African-American woman to win the office since the city’s incorporation in 1768. Photo Vi Lyles with her granddaughter, Arya Alexander, 2, after her victory in Charlotte, N.C., on Tuesday.CreditJeff Siner/The Charlotte Observer, via Associated Press Ms. Lyles defeated Kenny Smith, a Republican, in the race to choose a successor for Mayor Jennifer Roberts, whom Ms. Lyles had defeated in a Democratic primary. Ms. Roberts had been buffeted, from both the left and the right, for her handling of two issues: the fallout from the fatal police shooting of an African-American man, Keith Lamont Scott, in September 2016; and a debate over which bathrooms transgender people should be able to use in public buildings. In February 2016, the Charlotte City Council passed a nondiscrimination ordinance — supported by Ms. Lyles and Ms. Roberts — that prompted the Republican-dominated state Legislature to pass a law that required people in publicly owned buildings to use the restroom that corresponded with the gender listed on their birth certificates. The law set off a roaring culture debate across the state, and the Charlotte council eventually rescinded its ordinance as part of an effort to roll back the state law. The bathroom issue played a role in the election, with a conservative group promulgating ads that attacked Ms. Lyles for supporting a “radical” gay-rights agenda. Mr. Smith portrayed himself as a figure who could unite a divided city, while Ms. Lyles promised to increase resident involvement in police matters. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * A Historic First for Charlotte! Congratulations to Ms. Vi Lyles and the Queen City!
  10. Excerpt from post by @Cadi40on 11/06/2017: "But the topography also plays a factor in where you can and can't see the skyline." * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * To the extent that hilliness and view planes may be related to elevation, following are the elevations of various Tar Heel cities: (1) Charlotte, 751 ft., 229 meters; (2) Raleigh, 315 ft., 96 m; (3) Greensboro, 897 ft., 272 m; (4) Durham, 404 ft., 123 m; (5) Winston-Salem, 970 ft., 300 m; (6) Fayetteville, 263 ft., 80 m; (7) Wilmington, 30 ft., 9 m; (8) Greenville, 56 ft., 17 m; (9) Asheville, 2,134 ft. , 650 m; and (10) Boone, 3,333 ft., 1,016 m. Photo of Boone: Link at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boone,_North_Carolina
  11. In 2016, Charlotte had the 21st largest gross metropolitan product (GMP) in the U.S.A. Charlotte's 2016 GMP was $157.9 Billion. Charlotte's 2016 GMP was larger than the GMPs of peer cities, including: (1) St. Louis, $156.4 B, (2) Pittsburgh, $142.1 B, (3) Tampa-St. Petersburg, $140.2 B, (4) Indianapolis, $135.5 B, (5) Orlando, $129.4 B, (6) Cleveland, $129.3 B, (7) Cincinnati, $128.8 B, (8) Kansas City, $128.1 B, (9) Columbus, $126.5 B, (10) Austin, $125.3 B, (11) Sacramento, $123.2 B, (12) Nashville, $114.6 B, (13) San Antonio, $112.7 B, (14) Las Vegas, $104.8 B, (15) Milwaukee, $101.8 B, (16) Virginia Beach-Norfolk, $ 94.9 B, (17) Hartford, $89.7 B, (18) New Orleans, $81.8 B, (19) Salt Lake City, $81.5 B, (20) Providence, $80.9 B, (21) Raleigh, $79.7 B, (22) Richmond, $76.1 B, (23) Oklahoma City, $73.8 B, (24) Memphis, $73.1 B, and (25) Louisville, $72 B. See link at: https://www.bea.gov/newsreleases/regional/gdp_metro/2017/pdf/gdp_metro0917.pdf N.B.: Please accept my apology if this story previously appeared on this or another thread. Thanks.
  12. November 7, 2017 -- Charlotte's 249th Birthday! November 7, 1768 - "Charlotte Town" is incorporated, which means the new town will have a courthouse and a prison. Even though the residents disagree with laws set forth by Britain, they hope that naming the town for Queen Charlotte will win favor with her husband, England's King George III. As settlers clear the land in the growing community, they use rough-sawn logs to build homes. A few houses have bedrooms formed from partitions, but most have just one room, about 20 feet square, and one window. A stone chimney gives heat for warmth and cooking. From humble frontier days: To: Charlotte Photo of the Day posted on September 22, 2016, by @KJHburg "Skyline shot taken by my friend. We do live in a beautiful city." Cover from Charlotte Agenda, 09/03/15, "Definitive guide to 34 Uptown Charlotte development projects." Image of Charlotte by Clayton Sealey / @ricky_davis_fan_21 Charlotte Photo of the Day, captured from Twitter, posted on 09/24/2016, by @ah59396 "John Lennon in the park. Also this skyline shot is just cream." Here’s to a very happy 249th anniversary, Charlotte! Many happy returns! Mazel tov! Sources: "The Growth of Charlotte: A History; 'The Courthouse Village, 1760s-1800s'" by Dr. Thomas W. Hanchett; Link at: http://www.cmhpf.org/essays/HistEssay.html "The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Story, 1768 - Charlotte Incorporated". Link at: http://www.cmstory.org/content/1768-charlotte-incorporated Photo credit: http://www.cmstory.org/content/1768-charlotte-incorporated Photo credit: https://www.charlotteagenda.com/15655/definitive-guide-to-34-uptown-charlotte-development-projects-with-analysis-and-map/
  13. @ah59396 Actually, I learned a tremendous amount from you and from the other members of Charlotte UP who left posts on this thread. For example, I didn't know what a news "embargo" on the release of annual Census estimates was until I read your posts a long time back. Your pop. projections were fascinating and enjoyable to think about. Plus your idiosyncratic sense of humor -- AWESOME! Come back to Charlotte asap! Thanks again so much.
  14. Great, if paradoxical, answer! Everyone of Charlotte's prominent high-rise residential towers was constructed well after 1979, the American Community Survey (ACS) City Sector Model's demarcation point for a "Later Suburb". Charlotte's residential towers inside the CBD include: (1) The Vue, 2010, 51 floors; (2) Museum Tower Apts., 2017, 43 floors; (3) Avenue, 2007, 36 floors; (4) Ascent Uptown, 2017, 33 floors; (5) TradeMark, 2007, 28 floors; (6) Catalyst, 2009, 27 floors; (7) Skye, 2013, 21 floors (hotel & residence); (8) Sky House I, 2015, 24 floors; (9) Sky House II, 2016, 24 floors; (10) Element Uptown, 2014, 22 floors; (11) The Madison, 2009, 15 floors; (12) Crescent Stonewall Station, 2018 under construction, 22 floors; and (13) Northwood Ravin Apts., 2018 under construction, 20 floors.
  15. Density of Charlotte City of Charlotte (Municipality) Population & Land Area: 1940-2010 Census Population Area: Square Miles Area: Square KM Density (Sq. Mile) Density (KM) 1940 100,899 19.3 50.0 5,228 2,019 1950 134,042 40.0 103.6 3,351 1,294 1960 201,564 64.8 167.8 3,111 1,201 1970 241,178 76.0 196.8 3,173 1,225 1980 314,447 139.7 361.8 2,251 869 1990 395,934 174.3 451.4 2,272 877 2000 567,943 242.3 627.6 2,344 905 2010 731,424 297.8 771.3 2,456 948 Change 625% 1443% 1443% -53.0% -53.0% 2016 Census est. = 842,051. Land Area = 305.1 sq. mi. / 790.2 sq. km. Pop. density = 2,760 sq. mi. / 1,066 sq. km. Charlotte's density peaked in 1940. 1940 Census = 100,899. Land Area = 19.3 sq. mi. / 50 sq. km. Pop. density = 5,228 sq. mi. / 2,019 sq. km. Charlotte's density dipped to its lowest in 1980. 1980 Census = 314,447. Land Area = 139.7 sq. mi. / 361.8 sq. km. Pop. density = 2,251 sq. mi. / 869 sq. km. From the lowest density point in 1980 until 2016, Charlotte's density has increased by 509 sq. mi. / 197 sq. km. Data sources: (1) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_United_States_cities_by_population_density (List of U.S. Cities by Pop. Density as of 2010 Census) (2) http://demographia.com/db-uza2000.htm (Urban Areas [metro. areas] in the U.S.: 1950 to 2010) (3) http://demographia.com/db-uza2000.htm (Charlotte, N.C.) (4) http://www.newgeography.com/content/004130-the-evolving-urban-form-charlotte
  16. The PO has only used Zip Codes since 1963, though they used 2-digit postal zone numbers as early as 1943 for some large cities, e.g., Minneapolis 16, MN. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ZIP_Code Also, here's a Postal District boundary map for Charlotte (you can zoom in and out on it): http://www.zipmap.net/North_Carolina/Mecklenburg_County/Charlotte.htm One could make a small start via a link to Demograhics by Zip Code : https://charlottechamber.com/demo-ecoprofile/demographics-by-zip-code/ This link shows Charlotte's Zip Codes, and Charlotte's population for each Zip Code as of the 2010 Census, as of 01/01/2015, and a Projection for each Zip Code as of 2020. In addition, below is an excerpt from an article about Charlotte's density in Newgeography, entitled "The Evolving Urban Form: Charlotte," dated 01/08/2014. The article contains an interesting graph that shows Charlotte's population for each Census from 1940 to 2010, with Charlotte's area in sq. miles and km, plus Charlotte's density for each decennial census in sq. miles and km. Link for full article at: http://www.newgeography.com/content/004130-the-evolving-urban-form-charlotte Excerpt with Graph follows: Declining Densities in the Core City Charlotte is also in example of the difficulty of using the core municipality data for comparisons to the suburban balance of metropolitan areas. With North Carolina's liberal annexation laws, Charlotte has pursued a program of nearly continuous annexation such that in every 10 years since 1940, the city has added substantial new territory. In 1940, the city of Charlotte covered a land area of 19 square miles (50 square kilometers) and had a population density of 5200 per square mile (2,000 per square kilometer). For a prewar core municipality, this was not at all dense. For example, Evansville Indiana, which had approximately the same population at the time, had a population density nearly twice that of Charlotte. Other larger core municipalities approached triple or more Charlotte's population density, such as Trenton, Buffalo, Providence, and Milwaukee. Over the last seven decades, the city's population has risen by 6.2 times, while its land area has increased by 14.4 times (Table $$$). The result is a 53% decline in the city of Charlotte's population density, to 2456 per square mile (948 per square kilometer). This is only slightly above average density of the US built-up urban area – which includes the smallest towns and suburbs of every size – of 2,343 per square mile (1,455 per square kilometer). Indeed, the average far flung suburbs (30 miles distant) of Los Angeles, such as Pomona and Tustin, are more than 2.5 times as dense. City of Charlotte (Municipality) Population & Land Area: 1940-2010 Census Population Area: Square Miles Area: Square KM Density (Sq. Mile) Density (KM) 1940 100,899 19.3 50.0 5,228 2,019 1950 134,042 40.0 103.6 3,351 1,294 1960 201,564 64.8 167.8 3,111 1,201 1970 241,178 76.0 196.8 3,173 1,225 1980 314,447 139.7 361.8 2,251 869 1990 395,934 174.3 451.4 2,272 877 2000 567,943 242.3 627.6 2,344 905 2010 731,424 297.8 771.3 2,456 948 Change 625% 1443% 1443% -53.0% -53.0% Growth by Geography The core city of Charlotte's ever-fluctuating boundaries make it necessary to use smaller area measures to estimate the distribution of population growth. This can be accomplished using zip code data from the 2000 and 2010 censuses. Inner Charlotte, for the purposes of this analysis (zip codes 28202 through 28208) covers approximately 28 square miles (73 square kilometers) and had a population of approximately 92,000 in 2010 . This is a larger area than the city of Charlotte in 1940, which covered only two thirds as much land area and had more people. Between 2000 and 2010, this inner area population rose by 6,200 residents. All the gain was in the central zip code that comprises the downtown area (central business district), which in Charlotte is called "Uptown." Outside this small 1.8 square mile area (4.7 square kilometers), the inner area actually lost 1,400 residents. Overall, the inner area of Charlotte – which has somewhat an obsessive hold on many city leaders – accounted for 1.0% of the metropolitan area growth from 2000 to 2010. This is not unlike other major metropolitan areas, which have experienced slow growth, particularly in areas adjacent to the downtown cores. Among the 51 US metropolitan areas with more than 1,000,000 population in 2010, net gain occurred within two miles of city hall, while this gain was erased by a loss of 272,000 between two and five miles of city hall. Another 13% (64,000) of the 2000-2010 growth occurred in the middle Mecklenburg County zip codes (28209 to 28217), virtually all of which is in the city of Charlotte. This 185 square mile area, combined with the inner area, exceeds the land area of the city in 1990. Mecklenburg County's outer zip codes, many of which are in the city, captured 37% of the metropolitan area's growth (184,000). The remaining 49% (247,000) of growth in the Charlotte metropolitan area was outside Mecklenburg County (Figure 3). From 1990 to 2010, Charlotte was the seventh fastest growing metropolitan area out of the 51 with a population exceeding 1 million. Early data for the present decade shows Charlotte to have slipped to ninth fastest growing; however during this period, Charlotte has displaced Portland, Oregon as the nation's 23rd largest metropolitan area. Between 1990 and 2012, Charlotte added nearly 1,000,000 residents and now has 2.4 million residents. Below are 2 other graphs regarding Charlotte and its level of suburbanization, and comparing the 53 US metros with more than 1M population. See link to Newgeography story entitled "America's Most Suburbanized Cities," dated 06/07/2017 : http://www.newgeography.com/content/005640-us-metropolitan-areas-from-polycentricity-dispersed Seven of the 10 most suburban cities are in three states. Three are in Florida and two each in North Carolina and Arizona. They are listed in Table 1, and data is provided for all 53 in Table 2. Table 1 Most Suburban Cities: (Metroplitan Areas) 1 Charlotte, NC-SC 2 Riverside-San Bernardino, CA 3 Raleigh, NC 4 Orlando, FL 5 Birmingham, AL 6 Jacksonville, FL 7 Phoenix, AZ 8 San Antonio, TX 9 Tampa-St. Petersburg, FL 10 Tucson, AZ Out of 53 with more than 1,000,000 population The Most Suburban: Charlotte, NC-SC Charlotte turns out to be the country’s most suburban metropolitan area. The exurban commuting patterns of Charlotte expanded substantially over the 2000 to 2010 decade, which resulted in the largest geographic expansion of any major metropolitan area. Its exurban population is 51 percent and its urban population density is approximately 1,700. Table 2 Cities (Metropolitan Areas) Ranked by Extent of Suburbanization Major Metropolitan Areas: 2011-2015 Share (%) of Metropolitan Population by Sector Rank Metropolitan Area % Suburban CBD Urban Core: Inner Ring Earlier Suburbs Later Suburbs Exurbs 1 Charlotte, NC-SC 100.0% 0.0% 0.0% 10.2% 39.2% 50.6% 2 Riverside-San Bernardino, CA 100.0% 0.0% 0.0% 28.9% 29.6% 41.5% 3 Raleigh, NC 100.0% 0.0% 0.0% 7.4% 56.8% 35.8% 4 Orlando, FL 100.0% 0.0% 0.0% 15.7% 50.6% 33.7% 5 Birmingham, AL 100.0% 0.0% 0.0% 41.6% 25.2% 33.2% 6 Jacksonville, FL 100.0% 0.0% 0.0% 25.6% 49.0% 25.4% 7 Phoenix, AZ 100.0% 0.0% 0.0% 29.1% 52.0% 18.9% 8 San Antonio, TX 100.0% 0.0% 0.0% 38.6% 44.1% 17.3% 9 Tampa-St. Petersburg, FL 100.0% 0.0% 0.0% 44.2% 41.7% 14.1% 10 Tucson, AZ 100.0% 0.0% 0.0% 46.9% 41.0% 12.2% 11 Nashville, TN 99.8% 0.2% 0.0% 24.4% 36.9% 38.5% 12 San Jose, CA 99.8% 0.1% 0.1% 77.5% 9.3% 13.0% 13 Houston, TX 99.6% 0.4% 0.0% 33.2% 50.0% 16.4% 14 Dallas-Fort Worth, TX 99.5% 0.2% 0.3% 33.7% 43.1% 22.7% 15 Virginia Beach-Norfolk, VA-NC 99.5% 0.0% 0.5% 45.9% 38.0% 15.7% 16 Atlanta, GA 99.2% 0.2% 0.6% 14.8% 70.8% 13.6% 17 San Diego, CA 98.9% 0.0% 1.1% 61.3% 30.9% 6.7% 18 Sacramento, CA 98.3% 0.0% 1.7% 37.7% 40.9% 19.8% 19 Memphis, TN-MS-AR 98.1% 0.0% 1.9% 39.9% 35.3% 23.0% 20 Austin, TX 97.9% 0.4% 1.7% 15.4% 63.0% 19.6% 21 Las Vegas, NV 97.6% 0.4% 2.0% 16.2% 77.7% 3.8% 22 Oklahoma City, OK 97.2% 0.4% 2.4% 34.1% 32.6% 30.6% 23 Miami, FL 97.1% 0.3% 2.6% 50.0% 44.8% 2.4% 24 Denver, CO 96.9% 0.5% 2.7% 42.7% 42.7% 11.4% 25 Grand Rapids, MI 96.5% 0.0% 3.5% 33.0% 15.4% 48.0% 26 Salt Lake City, UT 96.5% 0.0% 3.5% 47.9% 39.2% 9.3% 27 Richmond, VA 95.6% 0.0% 4.4% 38.5% 38.4% 18.6% 28 Columbus, OH 95.3% 0.0% 4.7% 28.5% 38.6% 28.3% 29 Indianapolis. IN 95.0% 0.3% 4.6% 27.3% 42.6% 25.2% 30 Kansas City, MO-KS 94.8% 0.2% 5.0% 37.5% 26.9% 30.4% 31 Detroit, MI 93.7% 0.1% 6.1% 60.2% 16.6% 17.0% 32 Louisville, KY-IN 91.2% 0.5% 8.3% 44.5% 26.0% 20.8% 33 Cincinnati, OH-KY-IN 90.0% 0.6% 9.4% 40.3% 27.9% 21.8% 34 Portland, OR-WA 90.0% 0.7% 9.3% 36.0% 39.7% 14.3% 35 Los Angeles, CA 89.4% 0.4% 10.1% 76.1% 5.3% 8.0% 36 Seattle, WA 89.3% 1.1% 9.7% 35.9% 40.7% 12.6% 37 New Orleans. LA 89.1% 0.2% 10.7% 50.3% 7.0% 31.8% 38 Hartford, CT 88.7% 0.1% 11.2% 77.4% 1.0% 10.3% 39 Rochester, NY 88.6% 0.3% 11.1% 46.8% 7.9% 34.0% 40 St. Louis,, MO-IL 88.4% 0.1% 11.5% 39.6% 26.1% 22.7% 41 Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN-WI 86.8% 0.5% 12.7% 31.4% 33.7% 21.7% 42 Baltimore, MD 84.3% 1.4% 14.3% 42.0% 20.6% 21.8% 43 Pittsburgh, PA 84.1% 1.3% 14.5% 56.0% 5.0% 23.1% 44 Washington, DC-VA-MD-WV 83.3% 1.6% 15.1% 28.2% 36.6% 18.4% 45 Cleveland, OH 78.3% 0.0% 21.7% 48.5% 13.6% 16.2% 46 Milwaukee,WI 76.6% 1.6% 21.7% 50.7% 10.5% 15.4% 47 Chicago, IL-IN-WI 74.2% 1.2% 24.6% 44.9% 18.5% 10.8% 48 Philadelphia, PA-NJ-DE-MD 74.1% 0.9% 25.0% 50.5% 15.1% 8.5% 49 Providence, RI-MA 73.9% 0.6% 25.5% 47.9% 2.8% 23.1% 50 San Francisco-Oakland, CA 73.0% 3.3% 23.7% 54.0% 7.6% 11.4% 51 Buffalo, NY 71.0% 0.3% 28.7% 51.3% 3.1% 16.6% 52 Boston, MA-NH 64.3% 3.2% 32.5% 48.6% 3.6% 12.2% 53 New York, NY-NJ-PA 46.7% 6.5% 46.8% 35.2% 5.5% 6.0% Derived from American Community Survey using City Sector Model N.B.: I realize that some UP readers do not agree with the anti-New Urbanism thrust of some articles that appear in Newgeography. I'm not a professional demographer, and I don't support the particular POV of the authors of articles that appear on the Newgeography website. But I think that the raw data sets and graphs are interesting, aside from any spin that a particular author may choose to use as a framework for analysis. Thanks.
  17. Charlotte’s Historical Population Census Population 1800 276 (In 1800, Charlotte was NC’s 8th largest city/town behind (1) New Bern, 2,467; (2) Wilmington, 1,689; (3) Edenton, @ 1,000; (4) Fayetteville, @ 1,000, (5) Raleigh, 699, (6) Salisbury, 645, and (7) Washington, 600). 1810 n.a. 1820 n.a. 1830 717 (In 1830, Charlotte was NC’s 6th largest city/town behind (1) New Bern, 3,796; (2) Wilmington, 3,791; (3) Fayetteville, 2,868; (4) Raleigh, 1,654; and (5) Edenton, @1,500). 1840 n.a. 1850 1,065 (In 1850, Charlotte was NC’s 9th largest city/town behind (1) Wilmington, 7,264; (2) New Bern, 4,681; (3) Fayetteville, 4,646; (4) Raleigh, 4,581; (5) Greenville, 1,893; (6) Edenton, 1,607; (7) Greensboro, 1,500; and (8) Salisbury, 1,086). 1860 2,265 (On the eve of the Civil War in 1860, Charlotte was NC’s 6th largest city/town behind (1) Wilmington, 9,552; (2) New Bern, 5,432; (3) Fayetteville, 4,790; (4) Raleigh, 4,780; and (5) Salisbury, 2.420). 1870 4,473 (In 1870, Charlotte was NC’s 5th largest city/town behind (1) Wilmington, 13,446; (2) Raleigh, 7,790; (3) New Bern, 5,849; and (4) Fayetteville, 4,660). 1880 7,094 (In 1880, Charlotte was NC’s 3rd largest city/town behind (1) Wilmington, 17,361; and (2) Raleigh, 9,265). 1890 11,557 (In 1890, Charlotte was NC’s 3rd largest city/town behind (1) Wilmington, 20,056; and (2) Raleigh, 12,700). 1900 18,091 (In 1900, Charlotte was NC’s 2nd largest city/town behind (1) Wilmington, 20,976). 1910 34,014 (In 1910, Charlotte captured the title as NC’s largest city for the first time. However, Charlotte would not retain the title uninterrupted b/c the two towns of Winston and Salem merged in 1913, and so in the 1920 Census, Winston-Salem surged past Charlotte to become NC’s largest city). 1920 46,338 (In 1920, Charlotte was NC’s 2nd largest city behind (1) Winston-Salem, 48,395). 1930 82,675 (In 1930, Charlotte recaptured the title as NC’s largest city. In addition, in 1930 Charlotte took the title as the largest city in both North and South Carolina. Charlotte had finally passed the grand ole dame of Charleston, S.C., which had a population of 62,265 in 1930. Without interruption, Charlotte has remained the largest city in both Carolinas since the 1930 Census). 1940 100,899 [1930-40, +22.0%] 1950 134,042 [1940-50, +32.8%] 1960 201,564 [1950-60, +50.4%] 1970 241,420 [1960-70, +19.8%] 1980 315,474 [1970-80, +30.7%] 1990 395,934 [1980-90, +25.5%] 2000 540,828 [1990-2000, +36.6%] 2010 731,424 [2000-2010, +35.2%] 2011 756,008 2012 774,553 2013 792,906 2014 808,362 2015 826,395 2016 842,051 [2010-2016, +15.1%] 2017 874,344 Est. [If Charlotte’s population growth rate would be same as in period 2010-2014 (+2.58%/yr), Charlotte’s city population in 2017 would be 874,344]. Data Sources: (1) http://www.historync.org/NCCityPopulations1800s.htm (NC Business History - North Carolina City/Town Populations 1800 - 1900) (2) http://population.us/nc/charlotte/ (Population of Charlotte, N.C.) (3) http://population.us/nc/charlotte/ (Charlotte, NC. - Demographics) (4) https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?src=bkmk (U.S. Census Bureau American Fact Finder, Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places of 50,000 or More Ranked by July 1, 2016 Population)
  18. On 10/23/2017 at 9:16 PM, Cadi40 said: "I understand NYC, But Charlotte is actually the Place where the most millennials are moving to." Here's some support for Cadi40's comment regarding the attractiveness of Charlotte to Millenials. See link below: https://www.bizjournals.com/charlotte/news/2016/11/16/millennial-magnet-charlotte-ranks-as-top-city-in.html
  19. Is that the Moon floating just to the left of the DEC approximately three-quarters of the way up? Wow! Charlotte is so beautiful at night.
  20. A recent headline (09/20/2017) in The Boston Globe reads, "Amazon could find those 50,000 jobs hard to fill in Boston area." Boston's problem is that while the local schools produce lots of STEM graduates, very few of them hang around Beantown once they've graduated. Paradoxically, Boston suffers from a very large Brain Drain. See link: https://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2017/09/20/would-amazon-suck-all-tech-talent-boston/quW1jXN0ePqid5gGjdmw0I/story.html
  21. Big thanks to @RiverwoodCLT for the update of the Globalization and World Cities Network (GaWC) data. And very happy news to see that Charlotte has moved up 2 rank orders from Gamma- to Gamma+. Smart catch!
  22. The United Nations Population Division supports @Cadi40's post regarding Charlotte's enormous projected future growth. See link below from the UNC Charlotte Urban Institute: https://ui.uncc.edu/story/charlotte-and-raleigh-are-fastest-growing-large-cities-un-projections Charlotte and Raleigh top U.N. list of fastest growing large U.S. cities John Chesser | Aug 27, 2014 Charlotte's skyline reflects the rapid growth the city has seen. (Photo: John Chesser) City population projections produced by the United Nations show Charlotte and Raleigh as growing the fastest among large U.S. cities from 2010 to 2030. The United Nations produces population estimates and projections for cities from Shanghai to Johannesburg – including cities in the U.S. The U.N. uses areas it calls “urban agglomerations,*” which measure the continuously built-up areas around central cities. It’s a different measure from the Metropolitan Statistical Area used by the U.S. Census Bureau. In the U.N. projections, Charlotte and Raleigh stand out among U.S. cities of 500,000 inhabitants or more with nearly identical projected population increases of 71 percent from 2010 to 2030. The graph below shows that Austin, Texas, is next in these projections at 58 percent population change during the period. Source: United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division (2014). World Urbanization Prospects: The 2014 Revision. Several smaller cities across the country have faster projected increases. The Woodlands, a master-planned community north of Houston, has a 171 percent projected increase, followed by Temecula-Murrieta, Calif., with a 100 percent increase. The rapid growth projected for Charlotte and Raleigh as compared to several other southeastern cities (table below) shows the potential for a different urban hierarchy across the South. Austin’s projected rapid rise is also shown, since it parallels Charlotte’s in these projections. Source: United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division (2014). World Urbanization Prospects: The 2014 Revision. The graph shows a tightly grouped set of small cities in the mid-20th century, when the South was a much less urban place. In the 1990s Charlotte and Raleigh grew more quickly than their neighboring cities. Atlanta (not shown in graph), is projected to grow to more than 6 million by 2030, reinforcing its status as the South’s largest city. The U.N. projections measure urban areas that are physical, rather than functional, using the geography of continuous built-up areas. By comparison, the Census Bureau’s MSAs are functional urban regions, typically larger geographic areas, and are based on commuter patterns within urban regions. Both methods have their merits. The U.N. projections give an indication of the growth and spread of built-up city areas throughout the South since the last decade of the 20th century. That pattern typically has lower residential density here, giving the South more built-up area for the size of the population than other parts of the globe. *The concept of agglomeration defines the population contained within the contours of contiguous territory inhabited at urban levels of residential density without regard to administrative boundaries. Data for this article are from: United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division (2014). World Urbanization Prospects: The 2014 Revision. File 12: Population of Urban Agglomerations with 300,000 Inhabitants or More in 2014, by Country, 1950-2030 (thousands). These data are published in World Urbanization Prospects, which shows a long period of historical data as well as projections to 2030 for world cities.
  23. Here is one attempt by The Globalization and World Cities Research Network at Loughborough University in England to identify and compare 307 World Cities. Note that both Charlotte and Raleigh are ranked and considered to be "Gamma-" cities, defined as the 59 cities that link smaller economic regions into the world economy. See link at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Globalization_and_World_Cities_Research_Network Globalization and World Cities Research Network From Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaThe Globalization and World Cities Research Network, commonly abbreviated to GaWC, is a think tank that studies the relationships between world cities in the context of globalization. It is based in the geography department of Loughborough University in England. GaWC was founded by Peter J. Taylor in 1998,[1] Together with Jon Beaverstock and Richard G. Smith, they create the GaWC's bi-annual categorization of world cities into "Alpha", "Beta" and "Gamma" tiers, based upon their international connectedness.[2] The GaWC examines cities worldwide to narrow them down to a roster of 307 world cities, then ranks these based on their connectivity through four "advanced producer services": accountancy, advertising, banking/finance, and law.[3] The GaWC inventory ranks city economics more heavily than political or cultural factors. Beyond the categories of "Alpha" world cities (with four sub-categories), "Beta" world cities (three sub-categories) and "Gamma" world cities (three sub-categories), the GaWC cities include additional cities at "High sufficiency" and "Sufficiency" level. The following is a general guide to the rankings as of the most recent (2016) update:[4] Alpha++ cities are vastly more integrated with the global economy than all other cities. [4] Alpha+ cities are the eight cities that complement London and New York City by filling advanced service niches for the global economy.[4] Alpha and Alpha- cities are the 13 and 22 cities, respectively, that link major economic regions into the world economy.[4] The GaWC global cities according to the 2016 study: Beta level cities are the 78 cities that link moderate economic regions into the world economy.[4] Gamma level cities are the 59 cities that link smaller economic regions into the world economy.[4] High Sufficiency level cities are the 41 cities that have a high degree of accountancy, advertising, banking/finance, and law services so as not to be dependent on world cities.[4] Sufficiency level cities are the 84 cities that have a sufficient degree of services so as not to be obviously dependent on world cities.[4] The World According to GaWC 2016
  24. The NY Times Travel section (Sunday, 09/17/2017) carried a story titled "American Phoenix" regarding Chuck Berry's 1964 anthem "Promised Land". https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/11/travel/chuck-berry-road-trip.html?mcubz=0&_r=0 Charlotte was one of the destinations on the writer's road trip recreating Mr. Berry's journey across the South from Virginia Beach to LA. Of Charlotte, the author wrote: "Although Charlotte still faces its past demons -- a police officer here recently killed an African-American man, Keith Lamont Scott, setting off a wave of protests -- it is also a fast-growing, new-South technology and banking hub that charmed us on a mild summer day." Facially, there's not much there to connect Seattle with Charlotte except for one important word, "technology". Charlotte's connection to Seattle (a "mini-Seattle") is grounded in two familiar ways. First, there's Charlotte's aspirational connection to Seattle; second, there are countless human connections between the two cities. Aspirationally, Charlotte wants to be like Seattle, a major global city and international tech hub. The two cities also share a deep vein of human connections. You used to live in Charlotte and now live in Seattle. UPers who have been following your posts for years know they can count on trenchant commentary and wicked wit whether you're posting from Seattle or from Charlotte. My younger brother got his Masters degree in mathematics at UW in Seattle, and his N.C. license plate proudly says in bold letters "HUSKIES". My niece and nephew were born and raised in Seattle. My husband's favorite cousin and her husband live in Seattle. There's no denying that Seattle is already a great global city and a giant tech hub, while Charlotte aspires to become one. Oscar Wilde famously said that "imitation is the sincerest form of flattery that mediocrity can pay to greatness." Well, emulating Seattle also makes good sense for Charlotte. You're right that, at first blush, the two cities might appear to be "polar opposites," yet they're inextricably bound to one another by common aspirations and countless human ties shared across the 2,851 miles that separate them.
  25. Agree with @KJHburg; can't think of any major American city with as much "vacant acreage" (surface parking lots) adjacent to its core. As we all know, the bleak Levine wasteland that exists in First and Second Wards is the legacy of late 60's / early 70's "urban renewal" in Charlotte. It's taken more than 4 decades for life, spirit, and entrepreneurship to begin to sprout in our own No Man's Land. What's new and heart-warming is that, finally, there are numerous signs of vigorous life in the midst of all that vacant land, viz., (i) the amazing Stonewall corridor in Second Ward, http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/business/biz-columns-blogs/development/article116668438.html; (ii) the Library redevelopment in First Ward, http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/business/biz-columns-blogs/development/article138276948.html; and (iii) the proposed mixed-used Lennar development in First Ward, http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/business/biz-columns-blogs/development/article132644364.html. Regarding Amazon's space needs, The New York Times Upshot column (09/09/2017) said: "It’s hard to imagine where the Boston region would find the room for a company that will ultimately want up to eight million square feet of office space (the Pentagon, for comparison, has 6.6 million). Mayor Marty Walsh also said on Thursday that Boston is “not going to get into a bidding war with another city over something like this.” https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/09/09/upshot/where-should-amazon-new-headquarters-be.html?mcubz=0 And it’s pretty clear that a bidding war is what Amazon wants. " Well, Boston may want to play hard to get, but Charlotte has the can do spirit, the "vacant acreage," the smarts, the vision, the dynamism, the determination, and the entrepreneurial energy to become Amazon's HQ2.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.