PuppiesandKittens

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  1. PuppiesandKittens

    Crabtree Valley Mall

    Why didn't Saks Fifth Avenue move from Triangle Town Center to Crabtree, either when Lord & Taylor closed or even recently?
  2. PuppiesandKittens

    Cary Towne Center

    What went wrong with this mall? I've only been there once, about 25 years ago, but it seemed fine then.
  3. PuppiesandKittens

    The glut of available office space downtown

    Makes sense to me. The "all growth is always good all the time" crowd needs to quit going "woo-hoo, we're gonna be a big city, world-class, woo-hoo" over every single office box plopped down in Mauldin, and Greenville as a whole ought to celebrate longer-term trends that bring jobs, such as increasing educational levels, Greenville's new (apparent) reputation as a start-up-focused city, etc.
  4. PuppiesandKittens

    The glut of available office space downtown

    Build downtown instead of build in the suburbs. There is also a few hundred thousand square feet of net absorption of office space per year in Greenville County, so despite the current vacancies, new space will be needed at some point. Plus some companies look for large blocks of space having certain characteristics (such as minimum square feet per floor), and that might not be available in existing space.
  5. PuppiesandKittens

    The glut of available office space downtown

    Why doesn't the city take some of the large swathes of land in and around downtown and zone them and maybe even set up some type of beneficial tax arrangement to promote (1) new leases downtown and (2) new construction downtown? There's even a huge block of land forming an arc between McBee Station and Main Street, for some reason used as a semi-landscaped parking lot. That's prime real estate-what's the owner thinking?
  6. PuppiesandKittens

    The glut of available office space downtown

    I'm stating that, based on everything I've ever read, I have never seen a company state that it HAS to be in suburbia, period, and HAS to be outside of downtown, period, regardless of any other criteria. If anyone can share an article that states the contrary, I'm all ears; Google should be a good resource for this. I also acknowledge- and have expressly stated- that companies have reasons to be in suburbs. That's fine; to each his own. But my point--again--is that companies locate at a particular site based on a range of factors (typically price, commute times, availability of desirable space, etc.). They may pick the suburbs, or they may pick downtown, based on whichever best satisfies those factors. Downtown can work to improve its desirability based on typical factors considered by companies, and if it does so, it will win more corporate locations. I've never heard of a company ever stating, "We don't care about any factors whatsoever--we simply have to be in suburbia." That would be a very poor decisionmaking process to pick a site that way.
  7. PuppiesandKittens

    The glut of available office space downtown

    Sorry, but if there is no documented support for a fact, I can't simply take someone's word, when the documentation that I have states otherwise. Companies may certainly state that they want to be near a particular location. But they want to be near a location for various reasons, likely short commutes or short trips by suppliers; there is nothing inherently valuable about a specific site. If downtown is losing out to suburbia because companies want short trip times to specific areas in town (likely executives' homes, or suppliers), then downtown needs to improve its transportation and access to those specific areas, and that will help downtown win more companies.
  8. PuppiesandKittens

    The glut of available office space downtown

    Yes, I do. Your statement about Apple is contradicted by its own media release, which states that it is building at least one downtown location: https://www.apple.com/newsroom/2018/01/apple-accelerates-us-investment-and-job-creation/ Not one article that I have ever read, in the Greenville News or any business-related publication, or in any other local media, has ever stated that any company that has leased a large block of suburban office space in Greenville requires being in suburbia, period, regardless of any other criteria. Please point me to an article that contradicts this. It wouldn't make much business sense to completely eliminate any part of town for a new office location--at least without considering the price and other criteria. Plenty of companies probably locate in suburbia because they can build a new campus for cheap, or because there is even more of a glut of cheap Class B and Class C space in suburbia, and because they like being near I-85 or another suburban location. So they make their decisions based on attributes of suburban office space that are more appealing to them than downtown space is. My point is that downtown's competitive position relating to transportation, land costs, rental rates, etc. can be improved; no company that I have ever heard of or read about has ever stated something to the effect of, "rental rates, commute times, etc. will not be considered--we simply have to be in suburbia and refuse to even consider a non-suburban location".
  9. PuppiesandKittens

    The glut of available office space downtown

    How many of these companies have stated, "We want to be in suburbia. Period." NONE. They probably analyze the price of the land/building, commute times, etc. when deciding where to locate, and the competitive position of downtown (and areas near downtown) can be improved with respect to all of these factors so that the center city doesn't keep losing developments to suburbia. For example, parking, transportation generally, land prices (perhaps by zoning land near downtown to be used for large office developments), etc. can all be improved, making the overall position of downtown more attractive. Further, the Mauldins of the world could perhaps stop incentivizing relocations to Mauldin (for the tax dollar grab), in consideration of a more equitable sharing of property taxes among local governments.
  10. PuppiesandKittens

    Greenville County Square redevelopment

    Well, they have a point: county government offices typically aren't a magnet for other commercial development, other than maybe bail bondsmen. Just how many restaurants and retailers have located at County Square--locally-owned or chains? Just Cobb Tire (which has been there since the site was a mall) and a cafe that is in the back of the "mall", apparently aimed at workers in the building. Makes sense to me.
  11. PuppiesandKittens

    Greenville County Square redevelopment

    Indeed--one bidder that wasn't accepted stated that the land is too valuable for a government office, and a government office wouldn't help retail or restaurant recruitment. That seems wise to state--how many retailers choose to locate near city halls? None. Maybe that bidder should have won, and maybe the new County Square ought to be in another location where land is cheaper.
  12. PuppiesandKittens

    LEWIS PLAZA REDEVELOPMENT: Harris Teeter

    The McAlister Square Publix always seems pretty busy, despite being in a semi-derelict area. Publix seems to get higher customer-satisfaction scores than Harris Teeter, so Publix has that going for it. With all of these "better" grocery stores in town, makes me realize how horrid the grocery store scene was when I was a kid (when only Bi-Lo and Winn-Dixie were the options in town that I knew of).
  13. PuppiesandKittens

    The glut of available office space downtown

    I generally don’t like government involvement in anything if the private sector is capable of acting, but zoning is a typical government function, and overdevelopment is a case of market failure: one developer may come out ahead with a new building, but the community overall loses. There is already plenty of land downtown and near downtown, with infrastructure already in place, and it seems wasteful to build large new office parks in suburbia that requires destruction of semi-natural fields and forests. What if zoning in the 1970s hadn’t allowed 4 malls to be built within a few miles of each other? If it hadn’t, perhaps Greenville would have avoided the creation of large swaths of town that became derelict with the overbuilding of malls that resulted from most of them failing. Same for office parks: one developer may like a new building, but it isn’t necessarily good for everyone on balance.
  14. PuppiesandKittens

    LEWIS PLAZA REDEVELOPMENT: Harris Teeter

    So I tested out going to the HT at Lewis Plaza today vs. the downtown Publix: 1. The HT is very close to Crescent Avenue, but navigating Augusta Road (vs. a straight shot down McDaniel to Publix) might be a disincentive for people who live midway between both stores. 2. The parking lot in front of the HT seems kind of small for such a large store. I would expect some people in Alta Vista to shift from Publix to HT but there is so much continuing growth downtown that the Publix should continue to do fine. Where do people in Chanticleer and the west side of Augusta Road grocery shop now? Surely not the Bi-Lo next to Kmart...or do they? Also, Lewis Plaza is basically gone now: just a few smaller stores left!
  15. PuppiesandKittens

    The glut of available office space downtown

    I assume that the “all growth is good all the time” crowd would go bonkers, but can’t some type of zoning change be done to prioritize office space downtown instead of in suburbia?