Uncommon

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About Uncommon

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  1. Uncommon

    Central FL Roads and Highways

    Lane splitting is illegal in every state except Cali. It’s definitely aggressive driving by impatient, careless bikers. I’ve never been in California long enough to compare idiot bikers but if they’re anything like the swaths of 40-50 morons doing burnouts and wheelies on the 408 or on Colonial while holding up traffic, then they’re annoying AF. Half of those imbeciles are riding illegally and don’t even have license plates.
  2. Uncommon

    409 North Magnolia [Proposed]

    You’re sort of dispelling your own theories. There are hundreds of reasons that all coagulate to determine a city’s median income, and cherry-picking one reason like transit is pretty short-sighted. Have you ever been outside of Florida? I don’t say that disparagingly, I only ask because I want to know. So many people think once they step out of these borders that every other part of the US is a walkable haven, and it simply isn’t true. The entire country except for a few select cities (like 7 or 8 in total) are almost TOTALLY CAR-DEPENDENT. Major cities I’ve been to with higher median incomes like San Jose, Bridgeport CT, Dallas, and Pittsburgh all have awful to no public transportation. Cities like Charlotte, Atlanta, and Portland, god love ‘em, are trying, but their public transportation still stinks to high heaven. Yet it hasn’t affected their median incomes. Like I said, this is a NATIONAL issue, and punishing Orlando’s transit for “basically being useless” or “doing nothing” is extremely prejudicial. Orlando IS trying. Sunrail was built, and no it isn’t perfect, but Orlando didn’t have to even bother. They could have said, “no, we’re not building anything,” like Tampa or San Antonio or Nashville, which have absolutely NO rail at all. Orlando is a very new city, with an explosive, unexpected population increase compared with its inception. It’ll take time to catch up to much bigger and more established cities that have been doing this for decades upon decades. We simply have to be patient.
  3. Uncommon

    409 North Magnolia [Proposed]

    Interesting points on all fronts. Unfortunately, the original argument that a lack of parking lots will somehow buoy better public transportation is still invalid. My point was that the people that only DESIRE to use public transportation but would never be caught dead on a bus might move elsewhere if it truly was a sticking point. On the other hand, the people that NEED to use public transportation do use buses, Uber, and perhaps Sunrail. And yeah, it sucks, but it sucks almost everywhere in the U.S., except places like NYC, Chicago, Boston, maybe San Francisco, and a small handful of others. Also, Orlando doesn’t rank 50 out of 50 because of transportation lol. I’d have to fact-check you, but anyway, you just mentioned how only a handful of cities have adequate public transportation. Clearly, this isn’t an issue unique to Orlando and does not represent a correlation to median income. I hope you don’t truly believe this.
  4. Uncommon

    Cool Stuff in Other Cities

    Poor Jacksonville. I so want it to be the next trendy city, like Nashville or Austin or Charlotte, but man that place is a disaster. It’s got good bones though, so it’s just a matter of time and attention from a mayor or investor to lift Jax up. I thought Shad Khan would be to it like Vinik is to Tampa, but all of his plans so far have not come to fruition. Sad, the city has sooo much potential.
  5. Uncommon

    409 North Magnolia [Proposed]

    Removing parking doesn’t force anything, I agree, but it might deter some customers. There are days I don’t mind parking pretty far and walking to get to Briarpatch in Winter Park, but other times when I can’t find parking, I simply say screw it and go somewhere else where adequate parking exists, like Canopy Cafe. Never once have I thought of Ubering or parking downtown and taking Sunrail to the WP station. Sorry, but public transportation isn’t in Orlando’s fabric. I admit, there needs to be better transportation options, especially for those who don’t have a car or can’t drive or for people who just want it. But the chicken-egg conversation will probably never be answered, especially when you consider there are only a handful of U.S. cities where public transportation isn’t stigmatized as being for poor people.
  6. Uncommon

    409 North Magnolia [Proposed]

    Don’t you think if most people in Orlando wanted to use public transportation, they’d move to a city that better supports it? I don’t think you can force anyone to do anything. If they don’t want to walk or bike, they’ll simply go somewhere else that offers what they prefer to do. I don’t know that Orlando residents want to use public transportation, even if it were readily available.
  7. I like this design better, even if it resembles the I-4 Conroy bridge. The current design being built is, dare I say, ugly. Boring too. But something is better than nothing so I’ll stop complaining.
  8. Uncommon

    The Yard at Ivanhoe | Mixed-Use [Proposed]

    Not sure but the owners of Tampa’s Franklin Street Hall are expanding to Orlando and placing a food hall at the Yard. So it very well might be the building you’re talking about.
  9. That first pic provides a great view of the skyline that I’ve never seen before. It almost looks like Minneapolis from that angle. Awesome shot.
  10. Uncommon

    AAF Orlando

    It’s not bad but it’s boring. The fact that it needed emergency funding last week is a little worrisome. Anyway, it’s good the NFL considers this a minor league of sorts but I’d be surprised if it lasts more than 2 seasons. Either way, I’m not really interested but I hope Orlando does well with attendance so it’ll give the NFL an idea of how we are as a football market when it’s time to relocate a franchise or expand.
  11. Uncommon

    Orlando's Hometown National Champions

    Gah! You beat me to it @spenser1058 Anyway, with this win, UCF gets closer to becoming one of the teams that gets to vy for a spot at the big dance!
  12. Didn’t you make this comment like 3 days ago somewhere else? I’m getting a serious case of deja vu for some reason.
  13. Uncommon

    Radisson Blu | Mixed Use Hotel/Res./Comm [Proposed]

    Sounds like it will no longer be a Radisson Blu hotel either. I was looking forward to having Florida’s first here in Orlando. Now I’m sure Miami will snatch one up.
  14. Uncommon

    Radisson Blu | Mixed Use Hotel/Res./Comm [Proposed]

    Orlando's Appearance Review Board gave high marks to Conor Capital for the design of its proposed 19-story hotel-condo tower on North Magnolia Avenue. Maybe it was the lecture from Planning Director Dean Grandin at the start of the meeting, or the design tweaks by Baker Barrios, but in either case a planned 19-story mixed-use tower sailed through Orlando's Appearance Review Committee with only minor comments. Grandin told the ARB members they were offering too many contradictory opinions during courtesy reviews -- often on topics that were outside of their purview. Applicants were leaving with no clear direction on how to proceed. "It gets back to this issue of personal preference over objective design review," Grandin said. "We're all looking for great architecture that will stand the test of time." The tower's top four floors would house 40 luxury condominiums. The hotel and meeting facilities would utilize 14 floors, while the ground floor would house the restaurant and bar. ARB Coordinator Douglas Metzger said he was happy with the preliminary designs, which had been updated to add more transparency and to relocate a stairwell. "The latest elevations are really good. There's not a lot more work that needs to be done." Associate architect Cory Heck presented on behalf of the developer, Fort Myers-based Conor Capital, for the courtesy review. The project had been submitted as a Radisson Blu -- the first in Florida -- but now is not associated with a hotel flag. Vishal Patel, Conor's chief development officer, told GrowthSpotter that whatever brand the company signs, it will be an "upper, upscale" hotel with full banquet facilities. "The hotel ballrooms are on the second floor with no view obstruction and floor-to-ceiling windows," he said. "We want to be able to host large events. The restaurant and bar will be on the ground level. We’re in talks with a few great chefs out of Miami. We want to bring something unique to Orlando." Fort Myers-based Conor Acquisitions had filed plans with the City of Orlando for a new, 19-story mixed-use tower downtown that would be anchored by a 256-key Radisson Blu luxury hotel. Radisson launched the "upper upscale" Blu brand in Europe, Asia and the Middle East, and has more than 300 hotels... The tower, located at the southeast corner of N. Magnolia and Palmetto avenues, just south of the Skyhouse Orlando apartments, also would feature 40 penthouse condos and shared rooftop amenities. Patel said the corner units would be oversized and enjoy a 280-degree view of Lake Eola and the downtown skyline. "We feel the condo market very strong," he said. "We want to create a feeling of exclusivity. The condos will be very luxurious and high end." Conor paid $2.8 million for the .58-acre property, having acquired the final parcel last November. "We were under contract for quite some time," Patel said. "The previous owner was a great friend to us." The extended due-diligence period allowed Conor's development team, led by S&ME, to get a jump on the site planning and cost engineering. "We're on track to submit for permits by mid-March, and we intend to break ground this year," Patel said. https://www.growthspotter.com/news/hotels/gs-magnolia-hotel-design-sails-through-orlando-arb-courtesy-review-20190222-story.html
  15. Uncommon

    Orlando Transit

    Everyone here hates Lake Nona for what it represents but it’s shaping up to be Orlando’s “it” area along with I-Drive. Downtown is sorta doing its own thing but it feels like Orlando will never truly be cohesive with so many areas in competition one another.