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Andy20

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  1. https://join.crowdstreet.com/deal/society-nashville?twclid=266q32ocqjtqb85hx6w6zvgoap&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=CS_Test_Accredited&utm_campaign=Contextual_Real-Estate-Investors-Nashville&utm_content=Image_society-nashville_v1_3952
  2. Are they using this as a staging site for anything? New digging equipment on site. Fencing around it as well but I can’t recall if that’s new.
  3. I will preface this by saying I have a structural engineering degree, but I chose to go into a different field after graduation. I check this site everyday though as I still enjoy construction. That being said, I’ve designed mid size towers, around 15 stories, from foundation to roof. I have some knowledge but I’m sure a PE on here could correct me with some things. To answer your question…I would assume if they increase the size of the buildings, they would have to dig deeper in some fashion. But where they need depth is the question. When watching excavation, they dig out the main hole and then dig out the smaller rectangular holes for the footers. The footer holes will assuredly increase but unless they’re increasing the garage size or substantially increasing the buildings, I would think they just increase the size of the foundation, whether it be depth and/ or width. You do not need to go deeper where the towers will go but you will need more localized/deeper foundation support within the footprints of the towers. The general design would really just be three towers designed as they would be with a parking garage attached between them. The interesting part is worrying about movement, hot/cold expansion/contraction, wind movement, etc. There will be a lot rigidity within the entire project, so there needs to be plenty of expansion joints. This is really a pretty special project.
  4. Structural engineer here. Middle Tennessee and central Kentucky are known for their limestone as anyone who is on this site watching excavation would know. An interesting characteristic of limestone is that it is soluble. Solubility can causes a karst condition meaning that if there is any underground water drainage, caves begin to form. See the corvette museum in Kentucky as a prime example. We talked about this ad nauseam in geotechnical engineering. Tennessee actually has the most caves of any state in the US, but it’s also just standard practice to bore these holes. You just have to know what is underneath and what you’re building your foundation on before you put thousands of peoples lives at risk with a 40 story building. Greater than liability, it would be unethical to not drill deeper with a design change.
  5. This will be amazing for the area. It does not matter what they build here, anything will do. I work a couple blocks away and this property keeps not the best crowd around. The parking lot is also littered in old appliances, couches, and various trash.
  6. It is the Blackbird site. Non descript building behind Nashville sign. Yellow tape is around parking lot behind that building along 17th.
  7. Yellow tape and construction equipment at Broadway west end split. Not sure if there are any demo permits but something happening.
  8. I’m not sure if this has been mentioned anywhere, but it looks like Sky Nashville near Charlotte and 440 might be moving forward.
  9. https://www.urbanplanet.org/forums/topic/119966-909-division-16-stories-342-residential-units-215000-sq-ft-office-space-3360-sq-ft-retail-space-860-capacity-garage/page/2/#comments You can see the massing for this building as a white box next to 909 Division.
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