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Jones_

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Everything posted by Jones_

  1. I used to live in Glenwood-Brooklyn and still get some of their neighborhood emails. There has been some mention of a rezoning on West Street, north of Peace up to Tilden on the east side if the street from the existing 12 stories to 30 stories. That most likely implies a development on the horizon and I was just wondering if anyone knew anything about it. Seems like West Street would have a hard time supporting stuff that big...not much different than building it in the suburbs since streets are poorly connected here and transit is no better than the burbs.
  2. I wonder if that parking deck will be the front and center view for much of the Cotton Mill condo owners. A pedestrian bridge for them is way overdue to Seaboard.
  3. Well that's certainly not the building I expected to get torn down. Its a little rough inside but looks nice outside. Plus it has a helicopter pad on it. I know the Bath building is being talked about being torn down too (don't have an N&O account to read the article above). Anyway I always assumed they'd just build another building behind Admin and put in another pedestrian bridge to the Legislature.
  4. Jones_

    400H

    What exactly was this project going to do to the existing parking deck at Power House Square? I see the steel frame work going in over it but am not sure if its just more parking levels or somehow adding conditioned space over it.
  5. I forget who last brought it up, but the State Legislature is proposing to tear down the Bath Building (the borg building). No word on something replacing it...my guess is surface parking for at least a decade...
  6. Ah, thanks! 13-210 does provide some insight...so by 1938 a concrete paved US 1 is clearly realigned about 30-60 feet east of the old alignment...you can see the old alignment headed northwest of the McNeil intersection before becoming parallel with the concrete part. This has always been my assumption based on stuff I've read about the alignment up by the north Raleigh Hilton and an old road bed that used to extend north from Hillmer Drive directly in front of the old Crabtree Jones house (the Cemetery is still on Hillmer Drive if interested) I should have known US 1 would have been paved by then. So the one photo I have seen of the mill shows it exactly adjacent and NE of the road crossing over the dam. So it seems like that mill site is now directly under the road itself. :/ I'll look at the other photos later a little closer to see if anything else looks interesting. Edit: Re your Edit, 13-214 has Millbrook village in the bottom right...the whole map is a tad north of crabtree creek.
  7. Both sides of Wake Forest, north side, are landfill. If the mill site was on the north side its long gone under that. Also we know Wake Forest road used to be a couple hundred yards further west at the North Raleigh Hilton site (also the site of Isaac Hunters Tavern). The old site of Crabtree Jones house had a deep road bed extending between the dead end of Hillmer Drive and the driveway of the Jones house. This also coincides exactly with the western track of the old Wake Forest Road just north of here. Taken together it seems like the original crossing of the road over Crabtree Creek also would have been another hundred feet west or so. Murray's book has a photo of the mill dam that shows a wooden bridge passing over (but not *on) the damn. That suggests the dam itself would have been a hundred feet west as well. None of this area has much elevation drop so there must have been a very long mill race from upstream or an earthen embankment must have extended very far to each side (like the Millbrook dam, which still exists but is clearly smaller). I have also walked around under the bridge a few times and there are some old bricks among the rocks...they are weathered but its still hard to say if they were mill related or not. I am familiar with that little pool and think its a modern scour from all the parking lot runoff north of there but I can't be certain. The best chance of siting it with certainty would be aerial soil survey photos from the 30's (beginning of water and soil conservation districts) since the landfill was done in the 50's. I never got around to finding a source for those...the City used to have some posted 25 years ago but they were taken down. Its possible State Archives has them.
  8. The center of gravity downtown has certainly shifted. The emphasis on ground floor retail on this side of downtown has been the biggest factor IMO. Its a fairly stark contrast compared to Fayetteville Street's incongruous situation.
  9. I mean paying the price in a general sense. Of the many traffic bottle necks though, the Six Forks area feels like the worst. There is no flow to it at all, and as Dana alluded to below there are plenty of missed connection opportunities. Connecting the Browning/Computer drive area over the belt line to Hardimont, St Albans and Navaho would provide routes within the area without having to use bottle necked Six Forks or Wake Forest. And other dumb stuff like why isn't Dartmouth aligned with Hardimont? Why doesn't Quail Hollow extend to Navaho like its supposed to (the answer there is poor people)? There is some existing ROW to extend Windsor south to Church at North Hills. Nope gotta push 50,000 cars a day past North Hills. It backs up from Millbrook all the way to Lassiter Mill and has been since the late 90's. I am not even a 'build more roads' person, but the roads are neither pedestrian friendly nor car friendly. The mushrooming of this area has included zero improvement to infrastructure. These islands of mixed use are kinda pointless if they are not connected to and mixed with the rest of the city.
  10. Nothing much can be done now, but its really a shame how poorly this thing is connected to the City at-large or even North Hills. Wake Forest and Six Forks are already overwhelmed at the beltline and only parallel options stand a chance of helping. Transit will even barely work on such a horrendous street layout. Too bad because the buildings themselves are really good. Raleigh never, ever planned for this and now is paying the price.
  11. Carrboro has a decent amount of that sort of stuff even in its downtown. The surrounding County areas also are chocked full of that stuff probably for the lower overhead.
  12. I read this over and its not the whole block...North Street Beer Station and Rockford are both spared in the rezoning. Those being my favorite two spots on the block, I am not completely broken up over it though the Clockwork space is cool too.
  13. Yeah I could see right away it was a faux historic thing...Chapel Hill seems to have a dozen or so buildings like this...not sure how it ended up that way. For me WWII is sort of the divide for does the building count as historic (lets through out Federal guidelines about who lived there yada yada). The materials used and building techniques took a big turn after WWII due to materials shortages and then the need to rapidly house returning GIs after the war. Things have never been the same. Ah even though I am new to CH, I have actually been in this little cinder block thing...to use the bathroom during the Halloween fair they just had there.
  14. They are saving the Hill Building which is a huge relief. A fast look at Sanborn maps and I think this is the oldest commercial building on Franklin Street...at a minimum it is on the oldest Sanborn map for Chapel Hill.
  15. Is the second building the church that had the Halloween pony rides? (if you were mailer with that...was very popular with kids)
  16. Jones_

    400H

    I was just thinking too that this was the last of this size within the main grid.
  17. Charlotte has multiple areas that are busy at night so its spread out some...Raleigh is almost entirely concentrated downtown of which Hillsborough St, 5 Points and north Person more or less are a part of too. With the current price of steel, I'd not be surprised to see it stripped down to the girders and rebuilt from there with retail punching out to the street front. The current First Citizens tower in North Hills had this down 20 years ago or so.
  18. What a g od ddam shame. Those houses, especially the brick one, are among the best historic homes left on the west side of downtown.
  19. Any idea if the southern West street extension is part of this plan? If so, that would help some Ithink.
  20. I mean, I think everything looks weird shadowed by huge buildings
  21. I can see it both ways...Peace/Clark is one of our few retail areas that is fed by large walkable but low/medium density residential districts around it like Alberta Street in Portland OR or Bardstown Road in Louisville. These roads have a human scale and hence human interaction that is quickly stolen by huge buildings. But having said that, I do like (prefer) small floor plate mid rise buildings scattered around on corners to act like book ends to districts. The opportunity for architectural variety and not very menacing shadows is a good balancing act in the overall fabric.
  22. Apologies for sounding snarky but this is how it is supposed to be designed if a city is designing for cyclists and not the covenience of parked cars. Hillsbough Street's 'design' was an afterthought and criticized by all people who regularly ride a bike or advocate for bikes. Raleigh barely gives a crap as evidenced by its minuscule funding (the poor staff are doing what they can on a shoestring) and while the State DOT does have a bicycle division their recommendations are roundly ignored (per staff who I know). Not even kidding, if we don't shut up about the Chapel Hill one, the GA will come back and pass a law about cars have to be parked next to curbs or some other back door way to prevent these much better bike lanes.
  23. A running buddy of mine is one of them. He's stoked since his entire life already centers on downtown.
  24. It keeps saying "re" develop. I wonder what virtually brand new buildings they plan on replacing...
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