orulz

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orulz last won the day on June 9 2013

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About orulz

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  • Location
    Raleigh, NC
  • Interests
    transit, biking, running, outdoors, urban development, local politics

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  1. To the best of my knowledge, many/most of the transit privatization schemes that have actually worked and yielded real benefits are actually closer to real estate development schemes than anything else. Basically, the transit operator gets the infrastructure and a good deal of surrounding land. They operate transit to make the land near the stations more valuable, and develop that land in order to cover costs. Putting high-intensity uses near the transit stations also increases transit use, which makes the land still more valuable, and so on. It creates a cycle wherein the incentives are appropriately aligned. It also requires a planning regime that is either very top-down or else extremely hands-off so that NIMBYs and local governments can't get in the way and the private operator can basically build what they want in order to maximize their value. This is basically how things work in Hong Kong and in Japan. But Even there, however, the capital costs for actually building new transit lines are split by the private operator and governments.
  2. Two ways via rail to F-V: The 'direct' way, which goes via Wake Tech and really not much else, and the way via Cary, Apex, Holly Springs, and the abandoned Durham & Southern line, so much of which has been built over to make it impractical. Unfortunately, the above combine to make rail service to F-V not very likely, and a lower priority than than rail in pretty much any other direction.
  3. Is there a developer for this land who is making these proposals, or is this just the town studying possibilities? If the latter, it may take a while for this to get realized, but nevertheless I wish the town of F-V the best of luck.
  4. I was wondering when Fuquay would see something like this. Quite a nice little downtown. I am surprised we haven't seen a proposal like this for Apex yet which has probably the liveliest suburban downtown in Wake County. There is something of relatively similar scale in the works in Cary. Cary's downtown was a complete non-event a couple years ago, but with a population of over 150,000, they've been able to throw some fairly significant resources at livening it up - Academy Street rebuild, downtown park, Arts center, Cary theater - all of which finally seem to be having the desired effect.
  5. Are you sure they're going to tear down the house on 6 Bagwell? The conditions say "No new vertical construction." That could mean one of two things. 1. they are going to tear it down and use it as a parking lot, or 2. they are going to keep the house.
  6. BLE included a lot of property acquisition to widen and rebuild North Tryon. I assume that was a pretty big chunk of overall costs. A tunnel avoids all that. That said, tunneling itself is not generally the expensive part of building underground transit. Stations are.
  7. A slightly improved site plan was submitted recently for the Hillstone project at 305 Oberlin (Basically, the maiden lane apartments complex.) The east-west pedestrian corridor through the site, that was previously meandering and useless, is now arrow-straight clear from Enterprise to Oberlin, and the complex is divided into two buildings on either side of this corridor. I personally would like to see this east-west corridor opened to vehicular traffic, and also see Maiden Lane punched through northward to the corridor. In fact, mostly just NOT ABANDONING MAIDEN LANE will achieve that. The developers wouldn't have submitted this revised site plan unless the city was unsatisfied with their first submission. Hopefully the city keeps pushing them for more improvements.
  8. They might consider selling it for a reasonable sum south of Atando, like how they sold the Blue Line ROW between Woodlawn and 11th to Charlotte in 1998.
  9. Unused - yes. Abandoned - no.
  10. RE Harrisburg Amtrak Station: We've talked about this here before but there was a study done regarding the location, but I'm not sure the results. I thought the best option was the one along University City Blvd just east of Mallard Creek Church. That would allow it to connect with an eventual extension of the blue line.
  11. Pineville, Carolina Place, and Ballantyne are clearly the manifest destiny of the Blue Line. Just a matter of WHEN. 20 years perhaps, before this is up on the agenda?
  12. At any rate this is worlds better than the exploitative octopus apartments proposed for Maiden Lane.
  13. Seven story buildings can't be built of matchsticks and kindling. Sign me up! The part of the building above Dave's/Darryl's seems a bit expensive and unnecessary, given how little SD it actually adds compared to the rest of the project. But whatever, I'm fine with it.
  14. It can't be ignored that most of these fires are during construction: that one that went viral in Houston a few years ago where the construction worker and firefighterbarely made it out alive, santana row in San Jose about a decade ago. The edgewater fire is a bit unusual.... But the risk during the construction phase alone is enough for me to say NO THANKS.
  15. Never mind not wanting to live in one of these buildings. After seeing this, especially given the rather terrifying impacts to nearby buildings, I would not want to live next to one of these piles of kindling during construction either. Such bans already exist in many large cities, but even more suburban locales have done this before, too. Last year, Sandy Springs, Georgia has banned frame buildings that are over 3 stories or 100,000 square feet. Maybe Raleigh should follow suit.