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Norfolk History


wrldcoupe4

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I had been wondering whether or not Norfolk had regard for historic buildings. It had seemed like they were tearing everything old down to make new. I hope there is a balance between new and old and that historic structures are recognized and saved. Once a building is gone, it isn't coming back.

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Alot of those buildings are in rough shape, they really can't be renovated. Some can and I think they will try to reserve those buildings, there is a church downtown that has been there since the 1600's and has a canon ball in it from British during the revolutionary war and it is perserved very well.

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Alot of those buildings are in rough shape, they really can't be renovated. Some can and I think they will try to reserve those buildings, there is a church downtown that has been there since the 1600's and has a canon ball in it from British during the revolutionary war and it is perserved very well.

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Good to know everything is being leveled :) you would be surprised how far a building can come though, from almost falling down to absolutely beautfiful... does Norfolk have a large quantity of historic neighborhoods downtown? What type of shape are they in? If not so good, are people renovating? I guess what I mean is like in Richmond, there is a lot of restoration of old neighborhoods and a lot of investment in older buildings (tobacco row). Is there a trend like this in Norfolk along with the reshaping of the skyline?

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does Norfolk have a large quantity of historic neighborhoods downtown? What type of shape are they in? If not so good, are people renovating? I guess what I mean is like in Richmond, there is a lot of restoration of old neighborhoods and a lot of investment in older buildings (tobacco row). Is there a trend like this in Norfolk along with the reshaping of the skyline?

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There are a couple of areas that are FULL of old historic houses and apartments that I can think of right off the bat: Park Place (24th-38th Streets) and Huntersville (Tidewater Drive from Princess Anne to the railway bridge). Unfortunatley, these areas are very distressed with crime, drugs and a high ratio of renters to owners. 35th Street is looking nicer at the end close to Granby but they have only accomplished this by building new strcutures and not preserving the old ones.

From what I have seen though, these areas will have a long climb from obscurity. Many houses look to be in wretched shape and would take tons of cash to fix. Not likely when the house next to you is abandoned, burnt or an empty lot.

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I once heard that Norfolk has the 2nd most number of old homes in Virginia only behind Alexandria - if I am not mistaken.

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Wow I dont mean this in a bad way but I've never heard that about Norfolk. I know that Richmond's Fan District is one of the largest in tact historic Victorian Architecture neighborhoods in the country (85 blocks). Richmond's Museum District/West of the Boulevard is the 3rd largest historic district in the State. Perhaps Norfolk is in 2nd there? Could you find more info on that?

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Wow I dont mean this in a bad way but I've never heard that about Norfolk. I know that Richmond's Fan District is one of the largest in tact historic Victorian Architecture neighborhoods in the country (85 blocks). Richmond's Museum District/West of the Boulevard is the 3rd largest historic district in the State. Perhaps Norfolk is in 2nd there? Could you find more  info on that?

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It could be 2nd behind even Richmond. I just remember reading something like this when the Pilot interviewed Restoration Hardware which opened in MacArthur Mall. This was one of their reasons for coming to the area.

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Wow I dont mean this in a bad way but I've never heard that about Norfolk. I know that Richmond's Fan District is one of the largest in tact historic Victorian Architecture neighborhoods in the country (85 blocks). Richmond's Museum District/West of the Boulevard is the 3rd largest historic district in the State. Perhaps Norfolk is in 2nd there? Could you find more  info on that?

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Go down Freemason St. on the west side of Boush St. and you will walk into one of downtown's secret jewels, an upscale neighborhood filled with well-preserved (and even occupied by residents) houses from the 1700's and 1800's including one of only a few libraries built by Andrew Carnegie himself. The library is now used as a post office and houses a law firm and its interior and overall condition would make the unsuspecting visitor think the building isn't as old as it reallly it is.

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It could be 2nd behind even Richmond. I just remember reading something like this when the Pilot interviewed Restoration Hardware which opened in MacArthur Mall. This was one of their reasons for coming to the area.

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Wow for real!? That has got to be a very smart move for the comapny.

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Wow for real!? That has got to be a very smart move for the comapny.

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Perhaps a reason for them being in Stony Point in Richmond too....It's good to know that there is some historic preservation in Norfolk. Any organizations who focus on that in Norfolk?

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I once heard that Norfolk has the 2nd most number of old homes in Virginia only behind Alexandria - if I am not mistaken.

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I have that quote in refernce to Old Towne actually. Something along the lines of "the city with the second largest amount of 18th century homes" in VA. Or that Old Towne has the most 18th century buidings anywhere from Alex. to Charleston. Richmond has plenty of old buildings but remember that it was burned to the ground in the civil war so they would not be 18th century.

It may be a matter of wording, sort of like how Hampton bills itself as the "oldest continually inhabited English speaking city" in the US. Everybody's got to be something I guess.

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Richmond has plenty of old buildings but remember that it was burned to the ground in the civil war so they would not be 18th century. 

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True... some buildings were spared from the flames like the state capitol, St. John's Church, and some other places but much of the city burned...kind of a shame. I could definitely see norfolk, or somewhere in hampton roads at least, having an abundance of 18th century structures.

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I have that quote in refernce to Old Towne actually.  Something along the lines of "the city with the second largest amount of 18th century homes" in VA. Or that Old Towne has the most 18th century buidings anywhere from Alex. to Charleston.  Richmond has plenty of old buildings but remember that it was burned to the ground in the civil war so they would not be 18th century. 

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Except that Olde Towne is in Portsmouth. :silly:

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My favorite Norfolk historic building would have to be the Royster building (not sure of the name now, but that is what it was called for a while). Anyway, its the tallest building in this pic for those who don't know.

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Damn thats one good looking building!  :D

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Mine too. It may not be as tall as Trader or any of the towers on Main St. but it sure adds some character and compliments the skyline.

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Hmm, the Royster Building (I believe the name is correct, yes) is a beautiful one. While modern, glass-clad skyscrapers and condominium towers are gleaming examples of success and beautiful in their own right, architecture like the Royster building is a bit more hard to find these days. I hope that as the city's downtown grows, Norfolk can incorporate the old with the new and create a very elegant blend of both. Wow, like 912837 posts today for me haha. :P

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  • 3 months later...

I gather, then, that the Monticello hotel on the n/e corner of City Hll and Granby is long gone. What replaced it?

For years the Monticello was Norfolk's premier hotel.

And, oh boy! Was Main street wild!!! It had an International reputation amongst swabbies - especially the old Gaiety Burlesque House. :lol:

I think that area has been demolished and replaced with office towers, the Marriott, etc.

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I gather, then, that the Monticello hotel on the n/e corner of City Hll and Granby is long gone.  What replaced it?

For years the Monticello was Norfolk's premier hotel.

And, oh boy!  Was Main street wild!!!  It had an International reputation amongst swabbies - especially the old Gaiety Burlesque House. :lol:

I think that area has been demolished and replaced with office towers, the Marriott, etc.

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I think what you are talking about is where the Norfolk Federal building is at now. That is directly north of the Trader site. As you see Norfolk tore so much down and didn't build in its place. From what I've heard from old timers is that DT Norfolk was pretty dense and they tore alot nice buildings down.

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I think what you are talking about is where the Norfolk Federal building is at now. That is directly north of the Trader site. As you see Norfolk tore so much down and didn't build in its place. From what I've heard from old timers is that DT Norfolk was pretty dense and they tore alot nice buildings down.

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You're right. This is really weird, but when I was visting a couple weeks ago, my sister decided she wanted to get out of MacArthur and go into the sweltering heat. So I thought, might as well visit the trader site. Walking back from there, passing the Federal Building, I noticed a history marker on the City Hall Ave side of the building. It said the Federal Building now stands on the site of the old Monticello Hotel. The Monticello was the first of Downtown Norfolk's old buildings to be torn down to make way for modern offices. The Federal Building ushered in the first wave of new structures in downtown starting in the early 70's.

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You're right.  This is really weird, but when I was visting a couple weeks ago, my sister decided she wanted to get out of MacArthur and go into the sweltering heat.  So I thought, might as well visit the trader site.  Walking back from there, passing the Federal Building, I noticed a history marker on the City Hall Ave side of the building.  It said the Federal Building now stands on the site of the old Monticello Hotel.  The Monticello was the first of Downtown Norfolk's old buildings to be torn down to make way for modern offices.  The Federal Building ushered in the first wave of new structures in downtown starting in the early 70's.

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It looked to be a beautiful hotel too. I wish that it was still there. This was another GSA take over.

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