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AriPVD

ULI Boston meeting in PVD

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http://www.uli.org/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Events14

Not sure if everyone here is familiar with the Urban Land Institute (ULI)...it is probably the largest and most sophisticated real estate interest group in the country. A developer friend in Boston told me that they're meeting in Providence today because of the "unbelievable" and "interesting" opportunities in the city for Boston developers. As we've noted, most of the major projects today are being developed by Boston companies...Intercontinental, Roth (the developer of Parcel 6), BlueChip, etc.

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http://www.uli.org/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Events14

Not sure if everyone here is familiar with the Urban Land Institute (ULI)...it is probably the largest and most sophisticated real estate interest group in the country.  A developer friend in Boston told me that they're meeting in Providence today because of the "unbelievable" and "interesting" opportunities in the city for Boston developers.  As we've noted, most of the major projects today are being developed by Boston companies...Intercontinental, Roth (the developer of Parcel 6), BlueChip, etc.

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Hurrah for us! Providence has been getting more and more attention. I like that.

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"unbelievable"

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Unbelievable? :huh:

Those Bostonians are just jealous! :lol:

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I went this morning, it was interesting. It seemed to be a mix of Boston ULIers looking to see what was going on, and Providence ULI-folks who were just really eager to not have to go to Boston for a ULI event. Mike McMahon spoke- highlight of his talk was "Star-BUS" a way to improve the customer experience of public transport using technology and coffee. Basically you'd get starbucks to have kiosks at bus stops (for shelter, warm drinks) include technology so people know when the bus is coming, and a host of other things. Linda Painter presented from Providence, talked about zoning, all the developments happening in downtown and the "fertile cresent" (Mike McMahon's term for the Blackstone and Woonasquatucket River Valleys). And East Providence presented thier Waterfront commission, which sounds interesting. The event had a great turn-out, they had to bring in an extra table.

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Mike McMahon spoke- highlight of his talk was "Star-BUS" a way to improve the customer experience of public transport using technology and coffee. Basically you'd get starbucks to have kiosks at bus stops (for shelter, warm drinks) include technology so people know when the bus is coming, and a host of other things.

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That is interesting, not sure how that would all work. Did anyone say anything about funding, which seems to be the key issue?

It's nice to know that someone is thinking about transit. Personally, I'd rather see a "Star-TROLLEY". ;)

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highlight of his talk was "Star-BUS" a way to improve the customer experience of public transport using technology and coffee. Basically you'd get starbucks to have kiosks at bus stops (for shelter, warm drinks) include technology so people know when the bus is coming, and a host of other things.

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is that practical? how many bus stops have enough traffic to support a coffee stand w/ someone working there all day? the busier stops (i.e. thayer st.) probably have plenty of cafes nearby. having electronic signs for when the next bus arrives is good but probably expensive. they should at least start low-tech, by having decent maps at all the stops.

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Well you wouldn't want to put a Starbucks at every bus stop, yes, that would be impractical. But many bus routes converge at Kennedy Plaza, so there's a good starting point. And of course, maps should be updated at every stop to the most current ones available (just ask the MBTA in Boston about that, :rofl: )

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Has anyone in RI ever looked into the idea of a tiered mass transit system?

Something like-

Faced with an influx of residents and a stack of new road proposals, Curitiba in the early 1970s foresaw a land use crisis. More roads promised more driving and highly dispersed settlement patterns in Curitiba, a regional capital in southern Brazil. Instead, local leaders enacted a growth plan to concentrate development along five broad avenues that flare out from the city center like bicycle spokes. Then came the inventive bus system, using "feeder buses" to serve neighborhoods, and high-frequency "express buses" to link the outskirts to the downtown.

In addition to the land use component, several other elements speed up the Curitiba system. Just like with commuter rail, passengers buy tickets beforeboarding, then enter a 40-foot-long bus stand. The double-length bus arrives, multiple doors swing open, and pre-paid riders step aboard and are shuttled away in just moments. Moreover, the center lanes of Curitiba's main avenues are reserved for the express buses, leaving cars and trucks behind.

Other free ideas- http://www.fabermaunsell.com/MarketsAndSer...39/34/index.jsp

http://www.dksassociates.com/papers/ITEpaper.pdf

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I'm writing my thesis about that, Millboy. The Zurich and Portland, Ore. models are better suited to Providence I think.

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