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blueize74

Raleigh - Glenwood Towers Conundrum

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Glenwood Towers Story Here

Interesting that the complex is mostly elderly people in such a young part of town. I wonder what the future of this building could be and the political implications of having "forced out" so many retirees if it ever came to that.

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I saw this last night also...I believe they really are in the wrong area for what their needs are. They aren't close to groceries, or restaurants they can afford, like the article says. The same goes for the residents of the Sir Walter...I really believe that could be turned back into a high end hotel.

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the Sir Walter...I really believe that could be turned back into a high end hotel.

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Here-here! I'm surprised the city didn't want the Sir Walter to be redone as the Convention Center hotel (notwithstanding its current usage). It's a really pretty building, classic front entrance. It will look even better with a street back in front of it.

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Here-here!  I'm surprised the city didn't want the Sir Walter to be redone as the Convention Center hotel (notwithstanding its current usage).  It's a really pretty building, classic front entrance.  It will look even better with a street back in front of it.

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Why not? So they could get more new construction on Fayetteville St., that's why. :D I have nothing against senior citizens but It would be great to see the Sir Walter Apartments turned into a hotel or market rate residential space, though perhaps mixed income residential would be more likely.

Exactly what was it that caused so many cities to take once-grand hotels and turn them into housing for senior citizens? There are THREE such places in the 6-14 story range in Asheville (Battery Park, Vanderbilt, and that other one on Woodfin Ave but I can't remember it's name) that were all converted at the height of downtown's decline. Were they so seriously in danger of being torn down that this was the only way to save them? Given their historic value and interest, if these buildings were put on the market today people would be busting down the doors to live there... and the housing authority could use the money they made on sales to build even more housing for seniors somewhere else.

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Interesting theory - let's just hope that future leaders of Raleigh will never consider downtown prime real estate for a retirement home again.

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