Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Cotuit

Federal Hill Restaurant/Retail

193 posts in this topic

We have threads for East Side retail and Downcity Retail, but nothing for Federal Hill and there has been quite a bit going on on the Hill recently:

"Grill On The Hill" is a new diner/greasy spoon joint across from Rialto Furniture. I haven't been yet, but it looks like it might be pretty good, as far as greasy spoon breakfast places go.

There was a Subway next to Aqua Viva for about a minute and a half. There is now a sign on the building that says "Artini" a cafe and lounge is coming soon.

Another lounge recently opened where the Providence Cheese Company was at the corner of Dean and Atwells, "Angelo Bianco."

"Zooma" has replaced Eclectic Grill, I ate there a few weeks ago, it was nothing to write home about.

"Siena: Tuscan Soul Food" is at L'Epicureo's old location, it opened a couple weeks ago. I don't know what "Tuscan Soul Food" is, but I'm kind of interested.

What used to be Turtle Soup at Dean and Broadway is now some sort of bar, lounge, can't remember the name.

Decorum which was an eclectic furniture/antique store on the corner opposite Tony's Colonial is gone. The owner was interviewed in April's Providence Monthly. She has a location in Warwick which is still open, but couldn't make it on Federal Hill. Among other things, insurance was too high. She said she's keeping her eye on Downcity, but isn't ready to take the plunge yet, especially so soon after getting burned on Federal Hill.

Last fall "Gallery Z" moved up from near Eagle Square to a spot right next to Scialo Bros. Bakery.

The boutique next to the chinese restaurant closed, but a new one opened at Dean and Atwells where the palm reader used to be.

Dunkin Donuts near the arch is closing soon for renovations, but they do plan to re-open in the same location, regardless of what happens with the store proposed at Broadway and the Service Road.

"Riccotti's" has closed for renovations.

I'm sure I'm forgetting something.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


I've noticed two store fronts with building permits in the windows on the hill. One is the old Dollar Store in the same building as Bank of America near Dean Street. The other is a storefront near the Cicilline Law Offices. The Dollar Store has a dumpster out front. They are removing the vinyl siding on the side, but it looks like they are replacing it with vinyl siding. :rolleyes:

I found out that Angelo Bianco is a gay bar. It's in the same building that used to be Patriarca's headquarters, Federal Hill has come a long way. :o

Several houses are also being renovated toward the West End of the hill along the side streets between Atwells and Spruce. No vinyl on these. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As long as Scialo Bros and Venda are still there, I'll be happy. Damn I miss those cannoli...

Federal Hill is awesome, by far the best neighborhood in the city. It's got the most character and longest lasting culture, its gotta be close to the densest, it's a short walk from everything downtown, it's got the best restaurants in the state (in my opinion), it's got a great mix of people living in it now, it's got neat narrow little allies and classic triple decker tenements; it's basically everything that an urban neighborhood should be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As long as Scialo Bros and Venda are still there, I'll be happy.  Damn I miss those cannoli...

Federal Hill is awesome, by far the best neighborhood in the city.  It's got the most character and longest lasting culture, its gotta be close to the densest, it's a short walk from everything downtown, it's got the best restaurants in the state (in my opinion), it's got a great mix of people living in it now, it's got neat narrow little allies and classic triple decker tenements; it's basically everything that an urban neighborhood should be.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Federal Hill is indeed great. The only thing I wish is that the housing was just a little bit less dense. I love urban environments, but I do like at least a little bit of green space. Our yard isnt huge, but we at least have enough room for a patio and a swingset.

Liam

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The cafe next to Zuccollo's has become Angelrose Cafe (or something like that) featuring Korean cuisine (on Federal Hill? :o )

The location that was a clothing store next to the chinese restaurant is now Cafe Casablanca.

Artini is now open up near the Ocean State Chocolates shop.

As stated elsewhere, 333 Atwells now has a sales office at the corner of Atwells and Acorn.

The building where the dollar store was is now being renovated. They put (vinyl :sick: ) siding up, and a new roof. The store fronts are being renovated and look quite nice. The mini mart is stay, no sign of what is going into the dollar stores spot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The cafe next to Zuccollo's has become Angelrose Cafe (or something like that) featuring Korean cuisine (on Federal Hill?  :o )

Ohmygosh :w00t:... I love Korean food... There's only one option in the area thus far (the outstanding Sun and Moon on Warren in EP). I think I know what I'm doing for lunch tomorrow...

The location that was a clothing store next to the chinese restaurant is now Cafe Casablanca.

Yeah, I never got how a clothing store on Fed Hill survived...

Artini is now open up near the Ocean State Chocolates shop.

What is this?

Thanks for the update!

- Garris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BTW: I heard that Andino's is closed with a sign saying it's due to "unforseen circumstances" or something like that?

- Garris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ohmygosh :w00t:...  I love Korean food...  There's only one option in the area thus far (the outstanding Sun and Moon on Warren in EP).  I think I know what I'm doing for lunch tomorrow...

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

You better hurry up, everytime I walk by there the owners are just standing in the shop staring longingly out at the sidewalk. You might be the only one in Providence who even knows what Korean food is.

Artini is a lounge, the windows are all blacked out, and I haven't been in, so I don't know what it's like.

Cafe Casablanca seems to be doing pretty well. It's looks similar to Pastiche, but obviously has a better location being right on the Avenue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


BTW: I heard that Andino's is closed with a sign saying it's due to "unforseen circumstances" or something like that?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I walk by there every morning, shows you how observant I am. There were some guys out there yesterday with some sort of piping leading to a truck. I assumed it was some sort of cesspool pump or something.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ohmygosh :w00t:...  I love Korean food... 

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I came accross a few of your posting (food-related), seems like you're really into asian cuisine, eh?

:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I came accross a few of your posting (food-related), seems like you're really into asian cuisine, eh?

:)

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I'm kind of into food period, but I guess everything is relative... Lots of people I know consider me a "foodie" because I cook a lot, read a lot about food and its history, watch TV shows about food, try to eat out a lot, etc...

However, people I know who I consider true foodies consider me an interested dabbler... Interested, but not truly knowledgable. So who the hell knows?

I've been somewhat spoiled by living in New Haven (historically a much better ethnic restaurant town than Prov, despite Prov being by far the better overall restaurant city), NYC, and near the Twin Cities, all great restaurant towns. The Twin Cities, especially, both when I was there and now, is going through an amazingly adventurous time in its culinary history. It was a fun eating town. Here was a fabulous state of Twin Cities dining by the nation's best restaurant reviewer (in my opinion) Dara Moskowitz of Minneapolis' Citypages weekly (their version of the Phoenix): http://www.citypages.com/databank/26/1258/article12842.asp. This article, BTW, is one of the most entertaining reads, even if you know nothing (or care nothing) about the Twin Cities or food... Her writing style is hilarious and that she's super-liberal doesn't hurt...

Providence, despite being an outstanding restaurant town in its own right (especially for a city its size), isn't tremendously adventurous (unless you go outside of the established areas and into the ethnic neighborhoods). The mainstream eateries, in my opinion, are amongst the least adventurous of anywhere I've lived recently. We're kinda stuck in a neo-Italian, New American, fusionish kinda rut. We also lack some recent ethnic big city staples: a standout sushi place, a true dim sum house, a dedicated tapas restaurant, we don't have much middle-eastern, no amazing wine-bar (that I know of), no good Mexican or Tex-Mex, no real NYC style deli, almost no dedicated Asian eateries (almost all places here are Cambodian owned 4 ethnic cuisine places), no non-Indian SE Asian that I'm aware of, no African/Ethiopian dining, etc...

Boston actually isn't much better for innovative food, and the true foodies I know don't consider it a great food town. I actually know some people in Prov who occasionally travel to NYC and Phily a few times a year (the later considered by some to maybe be the best restaurant town for its size in the nation, who knows why...) to keep in touch with the "leading edge" of cuisine...

Folks I know "in the business" suggest that some of the most imaginative new restaurants are actually opening far outside the Providence metro in places like Bristol (for example, the outstanding DeWolf Tavern, which mixes Indian and seafood), South County, and E Greenwich/Warwick. The reason cited is usually that the lower costs/rents lessen the need for "safe" menus and the owners and chefs can take some more risks... A good example is the imaginative and fun "Twist" in Wayland Sq, which has gotten rave reviews, is actually an expansion from the first Twist in Warwick.

- Garris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Andino's is open again, I would guess they had somesort of mechanical problem that shut them down the other day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm kind of into food period, but I guess everything is relative...  Lots of people I know consider me a "foodie" because I cook a lot, read a lot about food and its history, watch TV shows about food, try to eat out a lot, etc... 

However, people I know who I consider true foodies consider me an interested dabbler...  Interested, but not truly knowledgable.  So who the hell knows?

I've been somewhat spoiled by living in New Haven (historically a much better ethnic restaurant town than Prov, despite Prov being by far the better overall restaurant city), NYC, and near the Twin Cities, all great restaurant towns.  The Twin Cities, especially, both when I was there and now, is going through an amazingly adventurous time in its culinary history.  It was a fun eating town.  Here was a fabulous state of Twin Cities dining by the nation's best restaurant reviewer (in my opinion) Dara Moskowitz of Minneapolis' Citypages weekly (their version of the Phoenix): http://www.citypages.com/databank/26/1258/article12842.asp.  This article, BTW, is one of the most entertaining reads, even if you know nothing (or care nothing) about the Twin Cities or food...  Her writing style is hilarious and that she's super-liberal doesn't hurt...

Providence, despite being an outstanding restaurant town in its own right (especially for a city its size), isn't tremendously adventurous (unless you go outside of the established areas and into the ethnic neighborhoods).  The mainstream eateries, in my opinion, are amongst the least adventurous of anywhere I've lived recently.  We're kinda stuck in a neo-Italian, New American, fusionish kinda rut.  We also lack some recent ethnic big city staples: a standout sushi place, a true dim sum house, a dedicated tapas restaurant, we don't have much middle-eastern, no amazing wine-bar (that I know of), no good Mexican or Tex-Mex, no real NYC style deli, almost no dedicated Asian eateries (almost all places here are Cambodian owned 4 ethnic cuisine places), no non-Indian SE Asian that I'm aware of, no African/Ethiopian dining, etc... 

Boston actually isn't much better for innovative food, and the true foodies I know don't consider it a great food town.  I actually know some people in Prov who occasionally travel to NYC and Phily a few times a year (the later considered by some to maybe be the best restaurant town for its size in the nation, who knows why...) to keep in touch with the "leading edge" of cuisine...

Folks I know "in the business" suggest that some of the most imaginative new restaurants are actually opening far outside the Providence metro in places like Bristol (for example, the outstanding DeWolf Tavern, which mixes Indian and seafood), South County, and E Greenwich/Warwick.  The reason cited is usually that the lower costs/rents lessen the need for "safe" menus and the owners and chefs can take some more risks...  A good example is the imaginative and fun "Twist" in Wayland Sq, which has gotten rave reviews, is actually an expansion from the first Twist in Warwick. 

- Garris

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Well said...but.

The prevailing thought of the big culinary folks insist that any major city - like Providence - is much better positioned if it has many choices in one major cuisine than a wide variety of fringe restaurants. The logic: limited cuisine competition makes for higher level quality that leads to reputation that brings recognition that grows business.

Actually, Providence is one example often cited. Also, remember the predominent demographics, identity, and history of Providence....this is not Tampa (a youngster with no identity).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, remember the predominent demographics, identity, and history of Providence....this is not Tampa (a youngster with no identity).

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I think the demographics of Providence would lead to exactly the kind of food diversity you say won't work- after all, 30% of the city is Hispanic, there is a large SE Asian community, a greater concentration of Liberians and other West Africans than just about anyplace, not to mention the old-school Italians and everybody else. The identity of Providence has changed with the times, and I would hope the food would, too.

As an aside- what I would give for a great Ethiopian place. . . we'll just have to wait a few years for the Somalis to get their feet under themselves for something similar to appear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just an F.Y.I...I went to the new Casablanca's on Federal Hill for a chai latte after dinner tonight.( I ate @ Twist in Wayland Square.) The place has a wonderful decor , excellent location, and great views for people watching. It appears that the place is owned by an older couple that are not too familiar with how to run a business.The woman had a very heavy accent and messed up one guy's order 3 times. He ordered biscotti and she brought him a piece of cake and then a giant cookie. We witnessed them cutting cake from a bakery box and then putting it on a dish ....there was no variety in the menu at all...I was upset I skipped Pastiche because of the long lines.I figured it would be nice to patronize a new business....Oh well...P.S. .....The food at Twist was out of this world...nice atmosphere, good service, and great food...definitely would return again..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Just an F.Y.I...I went to the new Casablanca's on Federal Hill for a chai latte after dinner tonight.( I ate @ Twist in Wayland Square.) The place has a wonderful decor , excellent location, and great views for people watching. It appears that the place is owned by an older couple that are not too familiar with how to run a business.The woman had a very heavy accent and messed up one guy's order 3 times. He ordered biscotti and she brought him a piece of cake and then a giant cookie. We witnessed them cutting cake from a bakery box and then putting it on a dish ....there was no variety in the menu at all...I was upset I skipped Pastiche because of the long lines.I figured it would be nice to patronize a new business....Oh well...P.S. .....The food at Twist was out of this world...nice atmosphere, good service, and great food...definitely would return again..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just an F.Y.I...I went to the new Casablanca's on Federal Hill for a chai latte after dinner tonight.( I ate @ Twist in Wayland Square.) The place has a wonderful decor , excellent location, and great views for people watching. It appears that the place is owned by an older couple that are not too familiar with how to run a business.The woman had a very heavy accent and messed up one guy's order 3 times. He ordered  biscotti and she brought him a piece of cake and then a giant cookie. We witnessed them cutting cake from a bakery box and then putting it on a dish ....there was no variety in the menu at all...I was upset I skipped Pastiche because of the long lines.I figured it would be nice to patronize a new business....Oh well...P.S. .....The food at Twist was out of this world...nice atmosphere, good service, and great food...definitely would return again..

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Thanks for the review... I live in Wayland Sq, and Twist is a favorite. One of the slicker and more imaginative restaurants in Prov, in my opinion...

- Garris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well said...but.

The prevailing thought of the big culinary folks insist that any major city - like Providence - is much better positioned if it has many choices in one major cuisine than a wide variety of fringe restaurants. The logic: limited cuisine competition makes for higher level quality that leads to reputation that brings recognition that grows business.

Actually, Providence is one example often cited. Also, remember the predominent demographics, identity, and history of Providence....this is not Tampa (a youngster with no identity).

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Yeah, I know, I've heard this before... And it probably has worked for Providence in carving out a regional identity for its restaurants, but it can also work the other way... There are cities with certain streets, regions known for more edgy, experimental, ethnic cuisines that are draws as well. It has certainly worked for the Upper West Side of NYC, Flushing Queens, "Eat Street" in Minneapolis, areas of Phily and Chicago, State Street in Madison, etc, etc.

- Garris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I know, I've heard this before...  And it probably has worked for Providence in carving out a regional identity for its restaurants, but it can also work the other way...  There are cities with certain streets, regions known for more edgy, experimental, ethnic cuisines that are draws as well.  It has certainly worked for the Upper West Side of NYC, Flushing Queens, "Eat Street" in Minneapolis, areas of Phily and Chicago, State Street in Madison, etc, etc.

- Garris

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I'd add Adams Morgan in DC to that list.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dina's magically re-opened this week. :huh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dina's magically re-opened this week.  :huh:

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I saw that! How weird! I wonder if its the same people or....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was at a Board of Licenses meeting at City Hall last week. Someone was applying for a license to operate a bar/pub at the old Gracie's location.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's really nice to see Atwell's paved! It doesn't feel like a third world road anymore, and won't embarrass the city when people from elsewhere come to visit. Is that the final surface?

Also, I had lunch at Cafe Angelrose today. Not bad. A bit pricey. It was "OK."

- Garris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm slightly less than impressed with the paving. The connections between the brick portions aren't as smooth as they should be. Of course I would have preferred that they totally remove the brick. The paving went rather quickly though, now I'm waiting on the striping. The street effectively has no crosswalks now and a driver this afternoon was ready to challenge me on that front. :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm slightly less than impressed with the paving.

That's why I asked if it was the final surfacing... It looks less than first rate, and is hardly glass-smooth, brand spanking new feeling...

- Garris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.