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PghUSA

More Condos for Pittsburgh

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This time on 4th Avenue near the Fifth/Forbes corridor that has recently been in a need of a face lift. This could provide it. The other condo/apartment projects are happening on the northshore and by the convention center and the mon river nothing in the interior of downtown . . . until now!

http://www.bizjournals.com/pittsburgh/stor.../16/story5.html

Developer to turn Carlyle into condos

$20M project will bring more housing Downtown

Suzanne Elliott PITTSBURGH BUSINESS TIMES

DOWNTOWN -- Developer David Bishoff is set to begin work on The Carlyle, his $20 million renovation project geared toward bringing Downtown more residents.

. . . . .

"We bought the building seven years ago," Mr. Bishoff told the Business Times during a recent interview. "I have always loved its curves, its stone and its corner location. It was built in the 1920s as a banking location. At that time, many of the developers were large financial institutions."

The need for more residents Downtown has been a hot button issue for the city during the past few years after attempts to redevelop the Fifth and Forbes corridor failed. Since that time, a number of Downtown housing projects have been announced. These include 151 Firstside, a $26 million, 82-unit on Fort Pitt Boulevard that is being developed jointly by Ralph A. Falbo Inc., a Downtown residential development company; EQA Landmark Properties, a Strip District development company and Zambrano Corp., an O'Hara Township construction firm. Also there is 100 Seventh St., a $35 million, 151-unit apartment project being developed in the Cultural District by Lincoln Property Co., a Dallas-based development company.

Other significant, yet smaller residential projects under way include 930 Penn Ave., a 23-unit project by Rugby Realty Co., the owners of the Gulf Tower and the Frick Building, and the Conestoga Building, a turn-of-the-century structure on First Avenue that is being converted into 18 apartments by developer Richard Stern. In all, around 3,000 people live in the city's central business district, according to the 2000 U.S. Census. . . . .

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I keep hearing that it will be a scaled down (in size) grocery store. Possibly a higher-end store (more Whole Foods than Giant Eagle). Although the housing costs downtown point to a higher end store, the amount of students living down there could make it a normal grocery.

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I keep hearing that it will be a scaled down (in size) grocery store.  Possibly a higher-end store (more Whole Foods than Giant Eagle).  Although the housing costs downtown point to a higher end store, the amount of students living down there could make it a normal grocery.

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I think that something appropriate should be located downtown in terms of a grocery store. Market Square makes the most sense, but supersize doesn't make sense or even a Giant Eagle. I don't understand why everything must be Giant Eagles and Eat n Park (which should not be downtown). A local market should downtown, one that even uses the strip as a fresh source of inventory. Or something along the lines of Whole Foods. Something urban, something fresh, something of quality.

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Good point PB,

lots of people still think only of The University District (Oakland) as being where "the kids are". With the growth of Point Park University (Celeb Dennis Miller's alma mater) and the downtown branch of Robert Morris University as well as the Art Institute, downtown has a rapidly growing student population.

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