steve3n8

Harveston Baton Rouge TND Development

30 posts in this topic

Wampold: TND on Bluebonnet to be more town than subdivision

Harveston Baton Rouge is the new name for Mike Wampold and John Fetzer's 1,400-acre traditional neighborhood development straddling the Bluebonnet Boulevard extension. Construction is scheduled to begin before the end of the year on the first 300 home sites in the project's first phase, which will be called The Preserve at Harveston. " 'Harveston' connotes a harvest and it connotes a town," says Wampold, who explains the genesis of the name came out of a branding and marketing charrette with several teams involved in the project. "At 1,400 acres, this isn't a subdivision. This is a town," he says. The 300 lots in The Preserve at Harveston will be developed on the south side of Bluebonnet, on 100 acres of an overall 600-acre tract that will otherwise be dedicated to wetlands and a nature preserve. "This is a town that will have walkability, trails, a farmers market, community gardens," Wampold says. The homes in The Preserve—which will range from 1,800 to 2,600 square feet and will sell for $300,000 to $400,000—will be built on spec by several select builders. "But the idea is they will sell from model homes and start building custom homes," Wampold says. —Stephanie Riegel

Businessreport.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Hmmm...the name Longwood Village did not work for them anymore...does this sound better??

Done in multiple phases this could take 15 years to complete this colossal project....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^No, I liked Longwood better. I know they teach them in developer school the naming formula (Natural Location) + (pronoun) + (Natural Feature), but they could still try to come up with something better and more interesting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Harveston is much less fun to say than Longwood. Probably a good thing they changed the name.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:lol:

Glad someone else is in touch with their obnoxious side. :)

On a related note.....There's a subdivision in my area that shares a name with the apartment complex in the film "Office Space".

Edited by cajun

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wampold: TND on Bluebonnet to be more town than subdivision

Harveston Baton Rouge is the new name for Mike Wampold and John Fetzer's 1,400-acre traditional neighborhood development straddling the Bluebonnet Boulevard extension. Construction is scheduled to begin before the end of the year on the first 300 home sites in the project's first phase, which will be called The Preserve at Harveston. " 'Harveston' connotes a harvest and it connotes a town," says Wampold, who explains the genesis of the name came out of a branding and marketing charrette with several teams involved in the project. "At 1,400 acres, this isn't a subdivision. This is a town," he says. The 300 lots in The Preserve at Harveston will be developed on the south side of Bluebonnet, on 100 acres of an overall 600-acre tract that will otherwise be dedicated to wetlands and a nature preserve. "This is a town that will have walkability, trails, a farmers market, community gardens," Wampold says. The homes in The Preserve—which will range from 1,800 to 2,600 square feet and will sell for $300,000 to $400,000—will be built on spec by several select builders. "But the idea is they will sell from model homes and start building custom homes," Wampold says. —Stephanie Riegel

Businessreport.com

This is odd. Didn't they start this earlier this year? They already have homes built. Unless there is another neighborhood next to it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Homes built? Isn't this to go where they are beginning to clear the land near Nicholson?

 

By the way, with a size that large, they should really diversify the size of houses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


A) diversify the houses? Why? There is a demand and that area is prime real estate.

B) yes, last I drove by they were laying foundation and creating a pond/small lake. I believe there was a few homes that were just starting. This is on the north part of the tract. It's possible it's just a small neighborhood that's not associated with this project.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
A) diversify the houses? Why? There is a demand and that area is prime real estate.

B) yes, last I drove by they were laying foundation and creating a pond/small lake. I believe there was a few homes that were just starting. This is on the north part of the tract. It's possible it's just a small neighborhood that's not associated with this project.

I'm not sure what demand or being prime real estate has to do with varying the size and prices of homes built in the development. I'm implying a similar format that is used in Willow Grove.

 

I saw the lake, I don't remember any foundations, however I was busy making sure I was going exactly 30mph and looking out for deputies. This was roughly a month ago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

<blockquote class='ipsBlockquote'data-author="Antrell Williams" data-cid="1248624" data-time="1355889167"><p>

I'm not sure what demand or being prime real estate has to do with varying the size and prices of homes built in the development. I'm implying a similar format that is used in Willow Grove.<br />

<br />

</blockquote>

It's the developers choice. They want it their way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Diversity in housing" from a developer's perspective is often a nice way of saying he's squeezing in more density than what the surrounding area would probably want.

More units, more return. Not always a good thing from the public's perspective.

Edited by cajun

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
"Diversity in housing" from a developer's perspective is often a nice way of saying he's squeezing in more density than what the surrounding area would probably want.

More units, more return. Not always a good thing from the public's perspective.

People here don't seem to mind being able to stand in between to houses and being able to touch them both.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

<blockquote class='ipsBlockquote'data-author="Antrell Williams" data-cid="1248725" data-time="1355939225"><p>

People here don't seem to mind being able to stand in between to houses and being able to touch them both.</p></blockquote>

If the homeowners don't mind, why should someone else?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Preserve at Harveston set to begin construction

Residential construction is set to begin in the next two weeks on The Preserve at Harveston, the 95-acre, first phase of Mike Wampold and John Fetzer's planned 1,200-acre TND straddling the Bluebonnet Boulevard extension. Some 350 homes are planned for The Preserve, 93 of which will be constructed on a 33-acre tract that will be the first part of the first phase, Fetzer says. Five local builders have been selected for the project: Colby Constructors, Distinctive Homes by Watson, Dupree Construction, Fetzer Properties of Louisiana and Unified Construction Group. They were selected after a careful vetting by Wampold and Fetzer from about 20 contractors who were interested in working on the project. "We went out and just looked at their product and in most cases we kicked the tires pretty good," Fetzer says. "We just felt these five were the ones we wanted to start with." Homes, which are being designed by LRK's Mike Sullivan, will be priced in the low-to-mid $300,000 range for smaller homes, and close to $400,000 for larger properties. Earlier this week, Wampold and Fetzer filed a revised concept plan for The Preserve with the Planning Commission, adding more than 600 acres to the total project. The added land was always intended to be part of the development and will be used mostly for trails and a nature preserve, Fetzer says. It is included in the revised concept plan because part of the land will run through The Preserve. The Planning Commission will take up the request in May. —Stephanie Riegel

Read more from Business Report here: http://www.businessreport.com/section/daily-reportPM&date=20130411#ixzz2QIGcTjsD

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Does anyone else feel like these houses are sort of cheap looking to say they cost so much?? Like the way the entablature is just sitting near the edge and the skinniness of some of the columns.

 

A good example : http://www.cjbrown.com/property/10552-preservation-way--baton-rouge-la-70810_381667

 

 

http://www.cjbrown.com/subdivisionlist/BRLAMLS/BATON_ROUGE/PRESERVE_AT_HARVESTON_THE/Area_53.htm

Edited by dan326

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Entablatures of all over the world sit like that, with columns that same size. Developers cut corners where they can but I don't think that is the area for concern here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes. The proportions are slightly off for the Greek Revival Style. The building is too wide for its height causing the small columns to be spaced too far apart. Also the height of the second floor gallery should be more similar to the height of the first, it being shorter is also causing the house to look squatty.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess my eyes are trained to see them a certain way from seeing how they go in front of the roof rather than on top like on old New Orleans houses. But, I mean, its that and the color choices and "common" looking bricks and siding. To me they look like dressed up "affordable homes" rather than cost engineered more upscale homes and I think they will not age too well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ Oh I totally over looked that part in the image you provided. Yes. IT IS WEIRD.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess my eyes are trained to see them a certain way from seeing how they go in front of the roof rather than on top like on old New Orleans houses. But, I mean, its that and the color choices and "common" looking bricks and siding. To me they look like dressed up "affordable homes" rather than cost engineered more upscale homes and I think they will not age too well.

You really have to step in it and inspect it before you start saying "it won't age well"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess that was jumping to conclusions but I just meant I think the outside will look sort of dated in 10 years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, a narrower front elevation would make for a better proportioned, more pleasing house, IMO. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The wave of the future..(actually started a few years back) Dig up some lil lakes/ponds w/ a lil' greenspace; maybe some walking trails; then pack em in TIGHT  with virtually no yards...

 

The "Preserve" lol....Some of the street names trip me out...Preservation Way? lol...Sugar Cane Lane sounds pretty cool!

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.