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Green Hills/Belle Meade Projects

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Here are some links discussing a proposed system in Austin:

Wired Magazine article - http://www.wired.com/autopia/2012/11/austin-gondola/

Austinist - Be sure to read the comment by Jared Ficklin in the comments section. http://austinist.com/2012/11/15/transit_for_austin_gondolas.php

At the top of the page there is a picture of the route map of the proposed system. http://www.fastcodesign.com/1671214/a-mass-transit-proposal-to-connect-a-city-using-aerial-gondolas#1

I agree with the general consensus that the biggest obstacle to system implementation is the aesthetics of the cable. That being said, every system has certain downsides. Subways have long construction periods and incredible expense. Heavy rail or elevated rail is noisy, occupies real estate, is expensive, and certainly is not the most pleasing things to look at. Buses sit in traffic, have a stigma, and have a large workforce (expense) to support their use. BRT takes up a lane of traffic, is not necessarily cheap, and is dependent on a large number of employees.

I think we would all agree that these obstacles can be overcome, and, in fact, must be overcome for Nashville to truly thrive over the next few decades. It seems to me that on balance the cable system would have the fewest obstacles for a city such as Nashville.

It's relatively cheap - According to the articles previously cited costs run ~$12 million per mile. We could have 53 miles of a transit center built for what it cost to build the Music City Center.

Minimal land acquisition- Other than acquiring the parcels of land for the stations there will be essentially zero purchase of right of way. There may be some air rights that must be purchased if part of the project flies over privately owned land, but I envision most of the route being over roadways.

High volume, scalable capacity - Per the articles cited the capacity can be up to 10,000 people per hour. This can be scaled up and down by adding or taking away cars from the line.

Minimal employment - Relative to other transit systems the number of employees that would be required to run the system is relatively small. HR is incredibly expensive and subjects the system to work stoppages and escalating costs.

Branding opportunity- If Nashville (or Austin or whoever) implemented a true system of cable car lines then that city would become known for that system much like NYC is known for the Subway, San Francisco is known for its streetcars, and Chicago is known for the "L". Suddenly when people come to Nashville they would leave with something that will be talked about over and over again. The views of the city would be incredible.

No schedule - One of the draws to car travel is that it is completely flexible in terms of scheduling. If I want to leave the house at 1:15PM I can do it without any delay. If I want to take a bus downtown I have to know when that bus is coming and schedule accordingly. Even on busy bus lines and rail lines is relatively high transit use cities like Chicago the wait for a bus a or a train may be 10-20 minutes. With cable cars there is a consistent, regular delivery of vehicles every 30 seconds, 1 minute, 2 minutes, etc.

There's no doubt that there will NIMBYs that complain about the aesthetics. But like anything it's a cost/benefit analysis. What is the expected good of having a system of mass transit that would allow thousands upon thousands of people to get to work, shopping, and entertainment without using a car when compared to the complaint by some that it doesn't look good? The same thing can be said for the "L" in Chicago, yet I doubt anyone here would turn down an "L" for Nashville right now if it was given to us.

Nashville needs a true transit system, not a single line of anything. Single line transit is next to useless. Whether we choose BRT, light rail, cable car, or a combination of these, it is incredibly important to have multiple lines intersecting. A single transit line with 10 stations will provide 45 round trip combinations of origination and destination. Linking two transit lines with 10 stations each yields 186 possible round trip combinations of origination and destination. Three transit lines with 10 stations each yields 431 possibilities, and 4 transit lines with 10 stations each yields 776 combinations. It keeps going up with each additional line.

We need a modality that will allow for these connections to be made, and that's one of the reasons I was a fan of BRT over LRT. For the cost of one LRT line we could have two BRT lines. Assuming the figure of $12 million per mile is accurate for cable car, for the $174 million ($23.2 million/mile) that BRT will cost Nashville could have three 5-mile lines with 10 stations each. I'll go out on a limb and speculate that more people would use a three line cable car system annually than a one line BRT system. That doesn't mean I'm not supportive of the EW Corridor, but I think we need to investigate other ways to develop a fully integrated transit system that will truly serve the riders with multiple options.

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Dont want to bust a bubble here but lets move the discussion to the mass transit thread as this has turned way off topic and those following that thread may want to discuss these options. :offtopic:

Great discussion and keep it going. :good: Just on that thread.

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Adding this here as whatever AmSurg wants, they usually get. Once we find the rendering we will post. A 4 story w/ parking deck at the corner of Burton Hills Blvd and Hillsboro Rd.

 

http://www.tennessean.com/article/20121207/BUSINESS/312060121/AmSurg-plans-new-HQ-Green-Hills?odyssey=mod%7Cnewswell%7Ctext%7CFRONTPAGE%7Cp&nclick_check=1

Edited by dmillsphoto

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With this project, it looks like there will be a number of projects happening in Green Hills over the coming year.

 

Proposed are the following:

 

AmSurg  4 story building in Burton Hills

Southern Lands 14 story project @ Richard Jones and Hillsboro

The Proposed Green and Little mixed use project which woudl include a 10 story hotel, offices, retail and residential. (on planning Comm. agenda for this month)

A 4 story addition to the Village Green apartments

A New Courtyard Marriott

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Construction permit issued for Chartwell's CY Marriott in GH yesterday.

 

I look for demo work for the other Chartwell project DT to start right after first of the year.

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The Planning Commission just approved a townhome development on Overhill just east of Hillsboro, behind that crazy looking building with the wrought iron fence.  I think that it is six townhomes.  Thank goodness Green Hills is getting some sensible, dense development.  People in the townhomes could walk to everything!

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The Planning Commission just approved a townhome development on Overhill just east of Hillsboro, behind that crazy looking building with the wrought iron fence.  I think that it is six townhomes.  Thank goodness Green Hills is getting some sensible, dense development.  People in the townhomes could walk to everything!

I assume the "crazy looking building" you refer to is the Alexander (or something like that). I always thought it looked like a riverboat.

I wonder which property they are going to put the townhomes on...everything over there is built out...so I guess they'll be tearing down a house or two. Perhaps here?

https://maps.google.com/?ll=36.100315,-86.817987&spn=0.000875,0.001321&t=h&z=20

I do agree that it would be nice for Green Hills to get some sensible dense development. I just wish they could work on the mess of strip malls and mini developments that dominate the area. I think the money in that area could make for a nice semi-urban mixed use district...but there is so, so much work that needs to be done.

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I assume the "crazy looking building" you refer to is the Alexander (or something like that). I always thought it looked like a riverboat.

I wonder which property they are going to put the townhomes on...everything over there is built out...so I guess they'll be tearing down a house or two. Perhaps here?

https://maps.google.com/?ll=36.100315,-86.817987&spn=0.000875,0.001321&t=h&z=20

I do agree that it would be nice for Green Hills to get some sensible dense development. I just wish they could work on the mess of strip malls and mini developments that dominate the area. I think the money in that area could make for a nice semi-urban mixed use district...but there is so, so much work that needs to be done.

Yes, that sounds right.  SWC Overhill and Kirtland.

Edited by bwithers1

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Southern Land project is delayed as they are buying more land and doing a redesign on the project. They will have to go before Metro for the changes. As to the changes, he would not comment.

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I wonder if they are considering adding more ground floor retail. I've heard that more retailers want into Green Hills, but there currently isn't much appropriate space available. I had also heard from people at West Elm awhile ago that Pottery Barn wants a new Green Hills location now that they're out of the mall. But they'd like a stand-alone concept similar to the West Elm. 

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Oh, I don't mind the urbanizing. And, to a point, I don't mind a few towers going up in Green Hills. Yes, I much prefer this being in Davidson County, and Green Hills rather than some other areas. I'm just saying I don't want this to be the green light for skyscrapers to be built outside of the core. 22 stories is borderline.

 

This isn't me complaining or opposing the development. I would just rather see the large scale stuff infill where it's really needed.

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