smeagolsfree

West End/Mid Town/Music Row/Vandy Projects

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Speaking of which, just coming back from coffee...

 

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ParkCentral progress...

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Elliston23 almost complete...

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Edited by dmillsphoto
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^^^

Agreed. Elliston23 is big and imposing...without looking out of place. I think it looks sharp.

 

 

Had no idea Park Central was that far along. I sort of forgot about it (since they spent so much time working on the plumbing, or whatever it was). 

 

A few more of these (as well as more restaurants, retail) and perhaps some smaller infill (<100 unit) and this could really become a hopping area of town.

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Yeah, from the pics Park25 looks like it has been slow.  I thought it would be further along by now.  Especially since how Ellingston went up so quick.

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There is some significant excavation work underway at the Spring Hill Suites site on West End at 18th. It looks like the nine story hotel will finally be built and provide more mid-rise infill for Midtown.

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I'm sure that since it's Nashville, this development by Southern Land is going to result in the destruction of the Sub Stop and that entire row of character-rich structures, while an empty grass lot sits right across the street. Yes, I am jumping the gun, and I'm sorry for sounding negative, I know it's not set in stone, but I'm just gearing myself up for what I think is inevitible.  It really, REALLY gets under my skin when developers do that.  This isn't just about your development and your company making money.  It's about building a vibrant neighborhood and being a part of what already exists, not destroying it.  Outside of downtown, the city is already down to just a handful of structures that could be considered charming and old by any stretch of the imagination, much less a continuous strand that stretches an entire block. 

 

I'm sure many will just shrug it off since these structures aren't "historic", but the best neighborhoods always have a vibrant and diverse mix of old and new that addresses the street and creates a unique, interesting, and visually stimulating environment for residents and pedestrians.  To me, that's just as important to creating healthy places than bringing in actual residents.  If the urban renaissance in Nashville is just going to involve eventually replacing every existing structure with isolated nodes of glass apartment blocks, then I'm not sure I'm very enthusiastic about that change at all.  It's a self-serving, regressive, and irresponsible mentality, and for the city it's really one step forward and two steps back everytime something like that happens.  Take the recent new development in Hillsboro Village.  I really do like it.  But destroying half of the existing neighborhood in order to build it while parking lots and empty spaces abound nearby, does absolutely nothing to increase the urban foot print in the city as a whole. 

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I'm sure that since it's Nashville, this development by Southern Land is going to result in the destruction of the Sub Stop and that entire row of character-rich structures, while an empty grass lot sits right across the street. Yes, I am jumping the gun, and I'm sorry for sounding negative, I know it's not set in stone, but I'm just gearing myself up for what I think is inevitible.  It really, REALLY gets under my skin when developers do that.  This isn't just about your development and your company making money.  It's about building a vibrant neighborhood and being a part of what already exists, not destroying it.  Outside of downtown, the city is already down to just a handful of structures that could be considered charming and old by any stretch of the imagination, much less a continuous strand that stretches an entire block. 

 

I'm sure many will just shrug it off since these structures aren't "historic", but the best neighborhoods always have a vibrant and diverse mix of old and new that addresses the street and creates a unique, interesting, and visually stimulating environment for residents and pedestrians. 

Well you are kind of jumping the gun since we aren't sure that's the tract and Southern Land has done great work before (Elliston 23 seems to be universally popular here).  But that row of buildings are really charming.  It's hard to see why they would be torn down when across the street there's a surface parking lot and an empty grassy space.  If this is the tract, they better be planning some retail/restaurant activation. 

 

Looking at google maps, there's enough room to build something behind those old buildings. I wouldn't think there's much of a height restriction there.

 

On a similar note, plans are to tear down the old stone house between Rhythm and Tamarind on Demonbreun and replace it with a parking structure, which seems kind of like vandalism since the entire back of that block is surface parking and there's room beside that house (not a residence at this time, but I mean the form, not the use) to make an entry to a parking structure built where the surface parking is now.

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I realize the area needs parking, but I hate that hundreds, maybe thousands of houses and walk-up apartment buildings that once lined all the streets of midtown are all gone except a few.  Regarding the Southern Land project, there are several vacant sites north and south of 17th and Broadway. The grass lot across from Sub Stop is owned by one person, as is the parking lot at 17th and Hayes.  Some of those buildings on 17th may be considered historic and I'd hate to see them go.  I bet if anyone happens to go to Sub Stop soon, the owners might know what's up.

 

On a similar note, plans are to tear down the old stone house between Rhythm and Tamarind on Demonbreun and replace it with a parking structure, which seems kind of like vandalism since the entire back of that block is surface parking and there's room beside that house (not a residence at this time, but I mean the form, not the use) to make an entry to a parking structure built where the surface parking is now.

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Just looked up the area on Google Earth and like the proximity to WES.  With that being said, I didn't realize how many undeveloped surface lots there are around the WES sight. Forgive me for not being at home in Nashville that often, but when I am, I usually focus on the WES sight when I drive by it :dontknow:  

Edited by bruceman73

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I am thinking it would be a minimum of 12 stories considering it is about the same number of units as Elliston 23 and half the size of the tract. It will also depend if they go below ground for parking, the orientation of the building and units, the number of spaces the parking will have, and if there is retail included which I would suspect there would be.

It would be a massive 12 story if built, but I suspect it would have to be closer to 18 stories maybe even taller because the Adelicia sits on 2.5 acres. I think the zoning in that area is 20 stories but they could go higher with a variance.

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I am thinking it would be a minimum of 12 stories considering it is about the same number of units as Elliston 23 and half the size of the tract. It will also depend if they go below ground for parking, the orientation of the building and units, the number of spaces the parking will have, and if there is retail included which I would suspect there would be.

It would be a massive 12 story if built, but I suspect it would have to be closer to 18 stories maybe even taller because the Adelicia sits on 2.5 acres. I think the zoning in that area is 20 stories but they could go higher with a variance.

 

I just looked at the corner on Google sv, and all can say is I certainly hope the row of buildings on the west side will be demolished.  That building containing the art gallery is so unique with the steps in the middle.   And looking across the street at the east side of 17th Avenue, that field is just screaming for a large urban style building.  Oh, I hope that will be the site. 

Edited by MLBrumby

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My hope is that it will be built on the vacant land right behind the  Orbison building.

Yes, that is the east side... and built up to the corner of Broadway.  That would be the best imho.  Still, part of me feels like many of these superblock apartments will never see light of day.  This one still sounds very sketchy.  I didn't even read when an announcement will be made.

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Closing would be this summer, they are working on the construction schedule.

Southern Land is really trying to make themselves the premier developer in the area. Between Elliston 23, McEwen, the Green Hills project, and this.... that's a lot of MASSIVE infill.

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That sounds pretty reasonable.  

 

The $4.5 million project will consist of 1,500-square-foot units consisting of two bedrooms, a flex space and balconies, priced between $360,000 and $375,000. The secure access-controlled building will feature high-end traditional finishes, elevators and a brick with stone accents exterior that Mcgowan described as "Jacksonian."

 

How does the price compare to the bigger condo buildings?

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