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West End/Mid Town/Music Row/Vandy Projects

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^All a matter of taste, I couldn't disagree more.   I think they are fine examples of the architecture of that period, and I hate the way people throw away the past.  I think this spic-and-span, shiny new pseudo-oxbridge stuff Vandy is building now, while very pretty on the surface, is hollow, it doesn't have the soul of the stuff it imitates.

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^^^Are you joking?   Vanderbilt  along West End will be the highest quality architecture  in the city.  IMHO

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21 hours ago, dxfret said:

Absolutely have zero regrets over the demolition of Carmichael Towers.  They are ugly, dysfunctional and very outdated. They remind me of the many Soviet era  buildings constructed in Russia and Eastern Europe.  Vanderbilt is replacing these with several spectacular new campus buildings and towers that are far better.  

They have red brick like many of those old industrial buildings I see ogled on here. Plus they actually have some nuanced contours so are not just boxes. And have  quite functional lobbies and half basements shared between towers. Compared to the below Houston West Loop abortion, those towers are pretty refined.  My terminology for that actually fits, there was to be in 2002 a twin to the one shown. wonder why it never got built. 

West loop abortion.jpg

Edited by dragonfly
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Vanderbilt Divinity School addition (3 stories, 13,641 sq. ft.) update.  Finished and open.

Looking NW from west of intersection of 21st Ave. South and Scarritt Place:

Vandy Divinity School, June 2, 2019, 1.jpg


Looking SW from west of intersection of 21st Ave. South and Scarritt Place:

Vandy Divinity School, June 2, 2019, 2.jpg


Looking SE from northern side:

Vandy Divinity School, June 2, 2019, 3.jpg


Interior views:

Vandy Divinity School, June 2, 2019, 4.jpg

Vandy Divinity School, June 2, 2019, 5.jpg

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M Cubed has purchased 1010, 1012, and 1014 18th Ave. South near Music Row for a collective $3 million.  These are one-time homes built in the 1920s that have incorporated music businesses over the past several decades.  They are directly to the north of the Midtown Place apartments ( 5 stores, 60 units) which were built on a similar sized plot in 2013.

More behind the Nashville Post paywall here:

https://www.nashvillepost.com/business/development/article/21072433/developer-on-spree-buys-again-this-time-near-row

The three homes are shown at the center of the frame in this Google screen shot, just to the left of the Midtown Apartment building:

Screen Shot 2019-06-10 at 2.29.10 PM.png

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They pulled a construction loan as well but we are not sure what they are going to be building. It should not be very large as the construction loan was only about 6.6 million.

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4 hours ago, Bos2Nash said:

Haven’t heard much about the Pannatoni’s timber frame building on Music Row, but Colliers International appears to be leading the leasing charge.

7B820BC9-4095-4033-A8D7-FD3B6AE29483.thumb.png.98ec9e082045db93b0d3785207ba015e.png

That last part of the caption speaks volumes of wood/mass timber construction. The amount of wood that will be used here will regrow through the North American forest in 2 minutes!!!! And this building will absorb carbon dioxide rather than release it like steel and concrete. 

But im not excited or anything about this haha

I’m definitely new to the timber mass production, but do you have to cut down trees to build these buildings? If yes, isn’t that bad (even tho they absorb carbon?)

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The 1.71 acres that entail 5 nondescript 2-story apartment buildings with about 50 units built in 1950 at  315 31st Ave. North and 3100 Long Blvd. in West End Park have been purchased by Parthenon Investments for $6.65 million.  Now word on their plan yet, but most likely the existing structures will be razed to make way for a denser residential project, like much of the rest of the neighborhood. 

More behind the Nashville Post paywall here:

https://www.nashvillepost.com/business/development/article/21072628/west-endarea-sites-sell-for-665m

 

This is a sample (315 31st Ave. North) of the six small apartment buildings that will most likely be razed:

315 31st Ave. North, Jun 11, 2019, site.png


The 6 buildings are located on this block with Long Blvd. to the left, 31st Ave. at the bottom, and Parthenon Ave. to the right:

315 31st Ave. North, Jun 11, 2019, site map 1.png


This screen shot shows the location:

315 31st Ave. North, Jun 11, 2019, site map 2.png

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I wonder if that was subsidized housing. I remember about 20 years ago, I did some work over at HCA. Staying at the Loews' I just drove up West End to 31st and cut across to their HQ, to save me from making too many left turns. Anyway, I drove by those apartments each morning, and saw a petite woman standing on the sidewalk at that corner with her (apparently) mentally handicapped son, a large boy of about 13. I saw him board a special education bus one morning. To this day, I can't help thinking about that woman and what happened to her and her son when I drive past that cluster of buildings. I guessed that it must have been very cheap rent (even then) in a very expensive area of town.  Sorry for the sidebar, but that photo made me think of them. 

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On 6/10/2019 at 9:11 PM, nashvylle said:

I’m definitely new to the timber mass production, but do you have to cut down trees to build these buildings? If yes, isn’t that bad (even tho they absorb carbon?)

The building will serve as carbon sequestration. Assuming that a tree will be replanted on the space again, you get both a new tree (which will absorb carbon) and sequestration of the carbon in the building. While it would probably be better from a carbon standpoint to never cut down the tree in the first place, this is superior to constructing the building out of concrete which will release a ton of carbon. 

Edited by Hey_Hey
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Yeah, mass timber is a great new trend that makes a lot of sense up to a certain height. I saw they're about to kick off a 21-story tower in Wisconsin. The energy/carbon costs of concrete and steel are not well-known, and the benefits of wood construction are even less appreciated. We're all used to getting angry about trees being cut down, but the real consequences of cutting down trees have a lot more to do with how the land is managed during and afterwards. Forested lands are actually really resilient, they're evolved to respond to periodic semi-massacres (i.e. naturally occurring forest fires) and will regrow like weeds if left to nature. It's when forests are clear cut for agriculture and/or development sprawl that we incur long-term negative consequences.

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The Impeccable Pig/Fido building has partially collapsed. Not sure if they’ve started construction on the old Jackson’s space and that led to this. 

03BF7850-84D9-4EFC-B7B3-F9C82C64FBAE.jpeg

2ED92A20-293F-4D59-B3A2-E6D44DBEAA63.jpeg

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That's messed up, and it's almost certainly because of the Jackson's demolition which is super frustrating because it was an necessary demolition in the first place. 

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Regarding the Impeccable Pig wall/ceiling collapse: it is obvious that the foundational digging for the new 2 story restaurant next door triggered this.  Hard to say at this time what sort of old/unknown  flaws below the surface caused the sudden instability.  More should be discovered in the next few days.  So glad no one was injured.

Tennessean coverage of the Impeccable Pig wall/ceiling collapse:

https://www.tennessean.com/story/news/2019/06/12/building-collapse-hillsboro-village-nashville/1439017001/

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^^^ Looks like they're progressing well. Is there an ETA on when they'll be in use and when demo will start on the existing buildings?

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1 hour ago, Jamie Hall said:

^^^ Looks like they're progressing well. Is there an ETA on when they'll be in use and when demo will start on the existing buildings?

September

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On 6/12/2019 at 10:40 AM, AronG said:

Yeah, mass timber is a great new trend that makes a lot of sense up to a certain height. I saw they're about to kick off a 21-story tower in Wisconsin. The energy/carbon costs of concrete and steel are not well-known, and the benefits of wood construction are even less appreciated. We're all used to getting angry about trees being cut down, but the real consequences of cutting down trees have a lot more to do with how the land is managed during and afterwards. Forested lands are actually really resilient, they're evolved to respond to periodic semi-massacres (i.e. naturally occurring forest fires) and will regrow like weeds if left to nature. It's when forests are clear cut for agriculture and/or development sprawl that we incur long-term negative consequences.

International Code Council (ICC) is updating what is allowed with mass timber in terms of height. Type 4-A buildings will be allowed up to 18 stories with your typical gypsum wall covering. This is very exciting for the design community and for the health and human wellness sector. (Reference: https://awc.org/news/2018/12/19/awc-tall-mass-timber-code-changes-get-final-approval)

 

4 hours ago, markhollin said:

Fairgrounds Exhibit  Halls update.

Looking south from Wingrove St., 1.2 block east of Byrum Ave:

Fairgrounds, June 2, 2019, 1.jpg

Thanks for the photos (as always) Mark. Interesting that they with such a small stone on the retaining wall here. I would've thought they would use a larger landscape stone for quicker construction and potentially more economical and less labor intensive.

Edited by Bos2Nash
Code Link
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Vanderbilt Mayborn Building addition (2 stories) update.  Basement of foundation now dug (hard to see from this angle).

Looking east from Magnolia Circle:

Vandy Mayborn Bldg, June 2, 2019.jpg

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6 hours ago, Scot said:

Interestingly they just removed the listings for this property from LoopNet. I wonder what’s up. 

Thanks for the heads-up, Scot.  We'll have to do some digging to find out. 

And welcome to the forum.  : )

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1800 21st Ave South (2 stories, 8,000 sq. ft. restaurant) update.  Foundation work for footings.  Even though they only dug 2 feet in spots, it somehow triggered the collapse of the wall of Impeccable Pig.  There must've been some unknown pockets--perhaps maybe an unused crawl space or something--underneath the wall that became unstable and and then crumbled.  It was not due to any equipment hitting the wall (there was not actually any construction work going on when the collapse happened).  My guess is that since that structure was erected around 1910, there are no blueprints in existence, and there was no way of knowing what was underneath.   It was probably just a matter of time before it would've come down for any number of reasons.  

Close-up of Impeccable Pig damage.  Looking south from the intersection of 21st Ave. South and Belcourt Ave:
 

1800 21st Ave South, June 16, 2019, 1.jpg


Looking east from the intersection of 21st Ave. South and Belcourt Ave:

1800 21st Ave South, June 16, 2019, 2.jpg


Looking south from the intersection of 21st Ave. South and Belcourt Ave:

1800 21st Ave South, June 16, 2019, 3.jpg

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