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smeagolsfree

CBD/SoBro/RutledgeHill/Rolling Mill Hill Projects

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Turnip Truck in the Gulch and some would argue the Kroger on Rosa Parks, however it is not an urban layout, but is just outside the DT code overlay and within the MDHA PJ .

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7 minutes ago, Bark At The Sun said:

Went in there this morning and am impressed so far.   They have a nice selection of produce along with other grocery items.   DGX pretty much has everything that HG Hills has, except for the deli.

dgx.jpg

It’s been a fantastic addition to the neighborhood. Super convenient and great prices for downtown. 

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It's great. So much bigger inside than it looks from the picture. My only caveat is that a lot of the brands they sell are the DG generic brands, but still a great improvement over having no options....

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I consider the Kroger store on 8th Avenue (Franklin Road) to be in Melrose/Berry Hill, not in downtown.  

The new Publix at Capitol View and the Whole Foods Market at 12th & Broadway are far closer to downtown. 

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1 minute ago, dxfret said:

I consider the Kroger store on 8th Avenue (Franklin Road) to be in Melrose/Berry Hill, not in downtown.  

The new Publix at Capitol View and the Whole Foods Market at 12th & Broadway are far closer to downtown. 

I think Memphian is referring to the Kroger on Rosa L. Parks (formerly 8th Ave N.) in Buena Vista, up across from Germantown.

Just now, Nashville Cliff said:

I think Memphian is referring to the Kroger on Rosa L. Parks (formerly 8th Ave N.) in Buena Vista, up across from Germantown.

I used to shop there when I lived downtown. Pretty convenient. Always made me scratch my head when folks said there were no groceries in or near downtown.

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That Kroger isn't very walkable from the CBD. That's what people are using as the benchmark. Most folks I know that live downtown, if they get into their car to go to a grocery, drive to one they consider nice rather than close. It's a lot to do with perception rather than reality.  

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1 hour ago, PillowTalk4 said:

One thing that Nashville should try to sell prospective stores on is that not only is there a growing residential community in downtown, but with all the hotels you have a large tourist segment that they will also benefit from.  When I travel to cities like New York and stay in a hotel that has a refrigerator in the room I tend to get my own soft drinks and juices because it's far less expensive than using the items supplied by the hotel.  So, I typically find myself stopping at Walgreens/Duane Read to get beverages and maybe a light snack.  In most parts of NYC you are within a short walking distance to a national chain store or even a local neighborhood market.  You'll also find plenty of them that are open late hours and some that are 24 hours.  I would imagine that tourist in Nashville would shop for the same reason at drug stores and markets located in downtown.  Plus they will go to those stores if they forgot to pack certain toiletries, etc.  I recently went in a Walgreens in NYC that also had a bit more grocery items than I'm used to seeing in their stores.  It even had an area with fresh vegetables and meats.  I'm sure that was done to address the growing number of condo conversion properties in the area.

You had room in a NYC hotel room for a refrigerator? You must be rich.......

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2 hours ago, PillowTalk4 said:

One thing that Nashville should try to sell prospective stores on is that not only is there a growing residential community in downtown, but with all the hotels you have a large tourist segment that they will also benefit from.  When I travel to cities like New York and stay in a hotel that has a refrigerator in the room I tend to get my own soft drinks and juices because it's far less expensive than using the items supplied by the hotel.  So, I typically find myself stopping at Walgreens/Duane Read to get beverages and maybe a light snack.  In most parts of NYC you are within a short walking distance to a national chain store or even a local neighborhood market.  You'll also find plenty of them that are open late hours and some that are 24 hours.  I would imagine that tourist in Nashville would shop for the same reason at drug stores and markets located in downtown.  Plus they will go to those stores if they forgot to pack certain toiletries, etc.  I recently went in a Walgreens in NYC that also had a bit more grocery items than I'm used to seeing in their stores.  It even had an area with fresh vegetables and meats.  I'm sure that was done to address the growing number of condo conversion properties in the area.

I discovered Duane Reed on a NYC business trip when the airline lost my luggage and I had to buy toiletries and other items in a pinch to make it to a big meeting.  Any store like that in downtown would be a huge asset. 

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There seems to be a Duane Reed about every other block in central Manhattan, at least it seems that way with all of the videos I watch of that area.

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14 hours ago, smeagolsfree said:

There seems to be a Duane Reed about every other block in central Manhattan, at least it seems that way with all of the videos I watch of that area.

Walgreens acquired Reade in 2010 or 2011 if I recall.   Walgreens left the stores alone pretty much until about a 2018.  That's when new signage on some of the stores was changed to read Duane Reade by Walgreens on them.  I suspect Walgreens will eventually phase out the Duane Reade signs.  But Duane Reade is like an institution to NYC.  Walgreens on the other hand had very few stores in NYC.  So, doing a wholesale change out right away probably would have been a disaster for Walgreens. 

Walgreens should strongly consider following the DR model in cities like Nashville and Charlotte, where the residential population in the city core is growing.  But in Nashville you also have a large tourist population to draw from.

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The existing brick building (and property) are considered "Worthy of Conservation" by Metro, so the developers will definitely have to answer some questions about the demolition. I would hope the they integrate some concepts of the existing building into the new design, but with its location and condition of the building it may be hard to actually retain the complete building in its original state.

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38 minutes ago, Bos2Nash said:

The existing brick building (and property) are considered "Worthy of Conservation" by Metro, so the developers will definitely have to answer some questions about the demolition.

Yeah, I wouldn't hold my breath waiting for Metro to ever stand up to a developer over a historic structure. We as a city just don't seem to give a damn about history when there are dollars to be chased and developers to appease.

1 minute ago, Nashville Cliff said:

Yeah, I wouldn't hold my breath waiting for Metro to ever stand up to a developer over a historic structure. We as a city just don't seem to give a damn about history when there are dollars to be chased and developers to appease.

And, I'd add the proposed hotel looks like just about every other apartment/small hotel being built in every other midsize and larger city.

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Sorry Mark & Paul, I strongly disagree about incorporation of the old structure into the new design.  The Victorian era is long past and the neighborhood on Lindsey has deteriorated architecturally into a hodgepodge.  IMO the only structure worth preserving is the church at Second Avenue, the exterior of which has been beautifully restored recently.   Most of the remaining area on the crest of Rutledge Hill is a treasure to be respected and preserved, but dissociated small buildings like this one are not particularly good candidates for enshrinement.  Like I stated about the Rudy House at 19th & Broadway, structure out of the context of the original neighborhood character of little historical value would not be high on my list to save.  This contrasts considerably with the vandalism of the homes lost for the Virgin Hotel, nice as it is for the height junkies among us.  This structure, while representative of the vanished elegant homes that once surrounded it, is a sad fragment with a crapfest of an addition grafted onto it.  This area of Rutledge Hill has been severed from the rest of the historic neighborhood by the Metro parking and offices that ate up so much of the neighborhood that existed there.  I don't recall exactly what Metro demolished but it very definitely isolated what remained on Lindsey from the rest of Rutledge Hill.  I can't even imagine what Victorian excellence was lost back in the 50s & 60s with the construction of the interstate and the public housing.   The proposed Muse development IMO is not particularly excellent in design, but it beats the Haven project in the Gulch by a mile.   I am also not much of a fan of the Rolling Mill Hill apartment complexes or the 9 story offices at Peabody (who on this forum likes IT other than it is "infill"?  At any rate, it is now part of our growing urban fabric and affords a lively streetscape  ( irrelevant to my opinion of its lack of elegance).   As to the Muse, don't forget that this site was just across the street from a fuel tank farm and a giant homeless encampment in the 90's and close to the industrial parks just on the other side of the interstate.  Don't cherry pick to justify preservation or mourn such small losses.  The apartments in danger of demolition over at Elliston  Place, THAT is a fight worth entering!

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It would nice if they could keep the original portion of the structure that fronts the unnamed street and only demolish the part that is along Lindsley Ave.

Also, it seems to me that the rendering featuring views of the skyline from the deck is misleading.  I can't see how they would have those views even in a 5 story building.  Maybe I'm wrong.  But considering that the property is sitting on the low end of an incline  the views of the skyline would easily be blocked by development in Rolling Mills Hill.  I'm not even sure they would see the top of the buildings in SoBro if the view up Hermitage doesn't stay unobstructed.

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2 hours ago, Baronakim said:

The Victorian era is long past and the neighborhood on Lindsey has deteriorated architecturally into a hodgepodge.  IMO the only structure worth preserving is the church at Second Avenue, the exterior of which has been beautifully restored recently.   Most of the remaining area on the crest of Rutledge Hill is a treasure to be respected and preserved, but dissociated small buildings like this one are not particularly good candidates for enshrinement. 

Setting aside the silliness of "The Victorian era is long past" part of your argument, are you saying that historic and architecturally attractive structures aren't worth preserving if they don't come in extant neighborhoods, or at least multiples?

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2 hours ago, Nashville Cliff said:

Setting aside the silliness of "The Victorian era is long past" part of your argument, are you saying that historic and architecturally attractive structures aren't worth preserving if they don't come in extant neighborhoods, or at least multiples?

Yes in this case.  The building in question is neither historic nor particularly attractive.  All  of the homes on the street  it fronts  upon were removed decades ago.  It is a pathetic remnant of a once attractive and viable neighborhood.  I believe that my statement included the phrase " structure out of the context of the original neighborhood character of little historical value" still is valid.   Of course,  buildings with significant history or reasonable  architectural note should be preserved but NOT every one... as a museum piece.  There must be an adaptation of use relevant to the times.   There reaches a point in many such cases that restoration  or even repair of structures such as this one become onerous to its ownership.  This is particularly true when the ratio of land value to the value of the usable occupancy becomes disproportionate.  I can think of no likely use for this structure in a restored condition that would come close to the value of the proposed apartments...even though they are fairly bland.  Certainly Edgefield, Lockwood Springs and the many other historic neighborhoods are examples of successful preservation achievements.  And your statement about "silliness" is naive.  Victorian design elements are of an age where craftsmanship and labor were cheap, and I might say unfairly so, when addressing the pay of construction workers back then.  The era is not too far removed from the Antebellum where slave labor was used.   You  must have missed my intent... that Victorian construction is not in the architectural mainstream of this century... and not much of the last either.  Before you squawk,  see if you can view  or read "the Fountainhead" by Ann Rand or perhaps watch "Batteries Not Included"  to see examples of how silly inappropriate preservation  or superfluous detailing could be.   If you insist on prolonging your criticism of my architectural opinion,  I am sure you will have high praise for some of the ghastly housing projects in this forum which cut and paste  Victorian elements willy-nilly.  No offense, but you have your opinion and I have mine.  I am uninterested in flame war.

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I have always just really like the front of that building. Just thought it would be cool if that could have been incorporated into the new building some way. It's nice infill. It could be even nicer if it wasn't the, in style architecture of the day and had an older feel to it. 

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