smeagolsfree

East Nashville/Inglewood/Madison/Donelson/Hermitage/Old Hickory

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WW,

Do you know anything about the next Martin Corner construction?  I've been given the impression that it'll be under construction by the time Tomato Art comes around.  Restaurant and retail space, apparently, on the corner where ReMax used to occupy.

C-Aisles,

 

Good question and I do not know. I might make a call to Mark (the developer). 

 

Thanks for asking.

 

WW

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I wish there were a coffeehouse within walking distance of my East Nashville abode. The nearest is 1.2 miles/25 minute walk.

Edited by Rockatansky

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I would expect some real estate appreciation - and even a coffee shop - coming toward East Hill in the near future.  The Black Raven Emporium is drawing the hipsters, and there are any number of buildings nearby that would be suitable for a coffee shop.  I'm pretty sure that the Trinity/Gallatin intersection is pegged for Neighborhood Center in the East Nashville Community Plan.  It's too bad that the chains dominate that area of Gallatin so heavily (McDonald's, KFC, Wendy's, Popeye's, Dollar General, Checkers, etc.) right now, but sit tight and enjoy the temporary lull in your property taxes. 

 

Maxwell, Cleveland Park, and McFerrin Park are north/northwest of Five Points.  The area east of Five Points is Lockeland Springs, which has been well in its way for more than two decades now.  But a big part of what changed for the area west of Gallatin Road is the change in the council person.  It's as simple as that.  The location was there, but the former council person, who shall not be named for fear that she will bring a libel lawsuit, seemed to hold that area back with 1970s attitudes.  The new council member actively recruits new residents, residential and commercial developers, and works closely with the police to get rid of the crime.  That's making a big difference. 

 

Plus, those who can't afford the BIG 3 neighborhoods (Edgefield, East End, Lockeland Springs) are pushing through the next ring of neighborhoods (Shelby Hills, Eastwood, Greenwood, Maxwell) and likewise, those who can no longer afford that ring of neighborhoods are going to the next ring (McFerrin Park, Cleveland Park, South Inglewood, Rosebank).  Give it a couple more years and Highland Heights, Renraw and East Hill will be gobbled up, too.

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There are certainly pockets of development north of Douglas.  I've lived near Riverside Village for the last 7 years and the change to that area has been similar to what I experienced living near 5 Points from 2000-2006. The demand for houses in Inglewood is very strong.  I have 3 different friends, all around 30-years-old, who have had a terrible time buying a house in the area over the last 6 months.  Every house they've seen has had multiple offers on the day of listing and all have sold above asking price, many to developers/investors.

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But a big part of what changed for the area west of Gallatin Road is the change in the council person.  It's as simple as that.  The location was there, but the former council person, who shall not be named for fear that she will bring a libel lawsuit, seemed to hold that area back with 1970s attitudes.  The new council member actively recruits new residents, residential and commercial developers, and works closely with the police to get rid of the crime.  That's making a big difference. 

Edited by Rockatansky

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<p>Hello,</p>

<p>&nbsp;</p>

<p>Long time reader, first time poster. Used to post occasionally on the old Nashville Charrette website. Anyway, I live where South Inglewood begins, just North of Douglas on the East side of Gallatin Road, and while there has been some steady developement since the economy went south, it's now just starting to really pick-up in the area. There been quite a bit of activity on Cahal (for better or possibly worse, as discussed on here), I just heard that Woodland Street Partners is trying to buy a bunch of houses on Chester (East side of Gallatin Road), so look for something to start happening there. There have been some houses on Straightway Ave, near Gallatin Road, being rehabbed into higher end rentals and also a new custom home being built that the asking price is going to be $300k+...I'm not as familiar with the west side of Gallatin Road/parallel, but to let you know, it is starting to heat up on the East side. Can't help it won't be pushing out to your area soon. The housing stock changes a bit when you cross Douglas into Straightway, into more post war cottages and small ranch style houses. But there is also no historical zoning in the area, so when the chips fall, I think you will see a lot of development (some good, some probably bad) go down in a hurry.</p>

<p>&nbsp;</p>

<p>On a another note, I have heard through the grapevine that someone has&nbsp;just bought the Howe Garden Apts on Greenwood (Eastwood Neighbors). So look for those to possibly be rehabbed soon. If you look at the crime maps you will see that a significant amount of &quot;issues&quot; arose from that area in the past. It's a fantastic location. Hate to sound like the big bad gentrifier, but only good can come from that transaction. &nbsp;</p>

<p>&nbsp;</p>

<p>Oh and the area where Riverside Village is South Inglewood, not Inglewood proper. They may be trying to claim it now though...</p>

Edited by TnNative

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Welcome to the forum. Always feel free to meet us at the forum meets. Tomorrow at Provence at 10 am at the downtown library. Glad to see someone from E Nashville posting. You guys have a lot going on over there.

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Oh and the area where Riverside Village is South Inglewood, not Inglewood proper. They may be trying to claim it now though...

 

I've been operating under the (mis)idea(?) that Inglewood starts at Trinity as you head north on Gallatin.

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Actually, to clarify, I believe Inglewood (North/proper whatever) starts at McGavock Pike, so technically only the businesses in Riverside Village on the North side of McGavock are in Inglewood, while Mitchell's, Sip, Village Pub, Wantanabe are actually in South Inglewood. Thanks for the invite smeagolsfree, but I work weird hours and will be sleeping during that time. I will definitly try to come to the next meeting on any days I'm off. I'll probably just sit quite in a corner and try to learn something.

 

I love what is going on all over Nashville, to finally see the city start to realize it's potential. And although the eastside doesn't have the flashy new builds like other areas of town, there is a lot of neat infill going on and I think Shelby Park is a really underrated greenspace and will only get better with the Cornelia Fort addition.

Edited by TnNative

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LOL, the whole "Inglewood" location creep is a big topic of debate in these parts!  Depending on whom you ask, Inglewood can take up as much as 1/4 to 1/3 of the greater East Nashville area.  Part of the confusion lies in varying degrees of overlap between what were the city/county boundaries at the time of Metro formation and the current boundaries of various neighborhood associations. 

 

The origin of Inglewood was a streetcar suburb that was platted in 1908 called Inglewood Place. This was where the Nashville streetcar ended and you could transfer to an inter-urban rail to go to Gallatin. Inglewood Place was only on the east side of Gallatin and only went a few blocks from Kirkland Ave (just past the CSX train overpass) up to Stratford Ave, where the Bank of America is today. From Gallatin Road, Inglewood Place only went in a few blocks east, because these streets that were platted terminated in farmland at that time. As time went on, more and more subdivision development began to surround the original Inglewood Place subdivision. Eventually, people started calling a lot of stuff "Inglewood" that was outside the original Inglewood Place but also outside the Nashville city limits. This is where the Inglewood boundary vagueness begins. 

 

At the time that Metro formed 1963, Cahal Ave was the northern terminus of the city of Nashville (it shows up on some contemporary maps as the Nashville-Davidson Balance), and everything past it was unincorporated Davidson County, which included a lot of territory that was called Inglewood, although there was no legal or official basis for calling that Inglewood.  What I mean is that Inglewood was not a city in 1963, it was just part of unincorporated Davidson County, so it technically did not have boundaries in the way that Berry Hill, Lakewood, Old Hickory, Goodlettsville, et al do.  Inglewood schools, including Litton High School, were part of the Davidson County school district, which was completely separate from the Nashville City school district until 1963.  When Metro formed, all of this area obviously became Metro (again, Inglewood had no legal status at that time that would have involved becoming a satellite city), but a lot of residents in that general area thought it more desirable to associate themselves with the Inglewood name, which still had some cache, than with East Nashville, which was already becoming a poor, rough area by 1963.  Although in time parts of Inglewood became poor and rough, too.

 

Today, the area from Straightway Ave up past McGavock Pike and from Gallatin over to Riverside Drive is organized by the Concerned Citizens of South Inglewood neighborhood group.  This includes both parts of the pre-1963 city of Nashville boundaries (Straightway up to Cahal were annexed by Nashville in 1926 and were never in any way part of Inglewood before) and some of the area that was not technically but was colloquially called Inglewood lying from Cahal up to Kirkland Ave.   South Inglewood Park used to be a rock quarry, and there was an historically African American community nearby that was called Rock City.

 

The Inglewood Neighborhood Association's most recent boundary expansion a few years ago still only went as far south as the railroad overpass/Kirkland until you got past Riverside, and then it included both sides of McGavock closer to the river.  That means that technically almost all of Riverside Village is in South Inglewood, whereas the Inglewood Neighborhood Association includes what used to be the Inglewood Place, Riverwood, Jackson Park and Dalewood subdivisions.  Sometimes the area west of Gallatin and over to the railroad tracks gets lumped in with "Inglewood" as well, but in fact most of that land west of Gallatin is organized by East Hill and Baxter Heights neighborhood groups.  There is a North Inglewood group that covers the area from Broadmoor (US Bank) up to Home Depot. 

 

Most of the area from Riverside Drive east to the river and from Shelby Park up to about Stratford High School is part of the Rosebank Neighborhood Association.  There is an historic precedent to this name because most of this land was part of the Rosebank Dairy operation until it was sold off for development in the 1950s.  Rosebank Elementary was built for this area of unincorporated Davidson County, and Stratford High School was originally going to be called Rosebank High School.  Lots of this area gets called Inglewood, too, but originally had a separate identity both from Inglewood and from Nashville.  It is dominated by 1960s brick ranch homes which are more recent than the 1920s-1950s homes in Inglewood and the 1890s-1930s homes of Eastwood and Lockeland Springs, although of course there are exceptions. 

 

So again, the issue with Inglewood is similar to but even more confusing than "East Nashville" in terms of geographic boundaries :  Inglewood is both a broad geographic area of several neighborhoods often colloquially called "Inglewood" as well as a more centralized Inglewood Neighboorhood Association, which itself encompasses severall other neighborhoods (Inglewood Place, Riverwood, Jackson Park, Dalewood, etc). 

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Inglewood did have some sort of defined boundary. If you look at an old Census, you'll find Inglewood listed (I'm not sure if they had CDP's then, or not). My guess is it was in a similar situation to Madison. I've seen a few sources that Inglewood had its own police and fire (I think Madison did, too). Madison still has its own utility district. 

 

If my memory serves me right, the 1960 population of "Inglewood" was 26,000 (which would've made it the largest true suburb at the time). I'll see if I can find more data.

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^Yes, Inglewood had 26,527 in 1960. That was the largest unincorporated area in the county. Woodmont-Green Hills-Glendale was 2nd with 23,161. Donelson was 3rd with 17,195. Woodbine-Radnor-Glencliff was 4th with 14,485. In 5th place was Madison with 13,583. These 5 were the ones listed as having above 10k people, and they had almost 100,000 in total. Davidson County was just under 400,000 at the time (with 170,000 in the old city), so those 5 unincorporated areas made up close to half of the remainder of the county's population.

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You guys are all over the scoop in East Nashville!  Good stuff.  

 

Hobson United Methodist Church at Greenwood & Chapel just hit the market for $1.5 million, listed by Beck & Beck out of Inglewood.  That price is crazy high, but I am eating my words all over town these days, it seems.

 

Fluffo is actively pre-leasing and will have a total of 60,000 SF of commercial space when completed.  Current tenants include Fat Bottom Brewing, Edley's BBQ, Hot Yoga of East Nashville, and The Filling Station.

 

Center 615 (Hardaway) is in final stages of renovation of the central wing to be delivered to tenants June 15.  West wing is full, east wing has only one suite left and central wing will be full or close to it by delivery.

 

Sales activity in East Nashville right now is extremely high.  Glad you guys are staying on top of it.  If you want to be on our list for commercial sales comps and quarterly newsletter, email me at [email protected]

 

Have a great day!

CG

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I read this too, The article highlighted the importance of revitalizing the area with a fresh start. The property is prime real estate, however, I would be interested to see the plans and how well they incorporate "mixed incomes." I could easily see this becoming a Virginia Highlands area (Atlanta), or even Hyde Park area (Cincinnati) that incorporates art, shops, restaurants that foster the creativity already present in the neighborhood. Aesthetics, walkability, transportation need a serious look before the plan is implemented.

 

http://www.hydeparksquare.org/

 

http://www.virginiahighland.com/

 

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Guest 5th & Main Urbanite

The Casey Homes need to go. There is no longer a need for public assistance for housing. The resident who complained about the $640 per month rent does not realize how cheap that is. Even at minimum wage at $7.25 an hour  that amount is manageable. The fact only 38% of the residents work tells the story quite well.

 

I hate seeing prime real estate be taken up by people whose culture does not value work. As long as people can have a place to live subsidized by the government, they will have no incentive to take care of themselves. None whatsoever. It is a shame that children are born into this cycle of poverty, but by the time they are teenagers they are exposed to enough via television and the internet to show them poverty at some point becomes a choice, not a circumstance.

 

It is also a shame most of us have to pay a lot of money with views of the city they get for next to nothing, and our tax dollars just enable them to stay where they are. 

 

I don't like the mixed income idea either. That will just breed contempt between the haves and have nots. Mixed income neighborhoods rarely work. Someone making minimum wage is not going to feel comfortable living with those making $100,000.

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 Even at minimum wage at $7.25 an hour  that amount is manageable.

Hardly. $640/$1,160($7.25*40*4) = 55%. The federal definition of rent burdened is anyone paying greater than 30% of their income in rent. This falls in the category of severly rent burdened.

 

Also, federal housing assistance is .5% of the US budget.

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Guest 5th & Main Urbanite

Hardly. $640/$1,160($7.25*40*4) = 55%. The federal definition of rent burdened is anyone paying greater than 30% of their income in rent. This falls in the category of severly rent burdened.

 

Also, federal housing assistance is .5% of the US budget.

There are more than 40 hours in a week.

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Who posted this? I fear my friend John has been abducted... ; )

 

The Casey Homes need to go. There is no longer a need for public assistance for housing. The resident who complained about the $640 per month rent does not realize how cheap that is. Even at minimum wage at $7.25 an hour  that amount is manageable. The fact only 38% of the residents work tells the story quite well.

 

I hate seeing prime real estate be taken up by people whose culture does not value work. As long as people can have a place to live subsidized by the government, they will have no incentive to take care of themselves. None whatsoever. It is a shame that children are born into this cycle of poverty, but by the time they are teenagers they are exposed to enough via television and the internet to show them poverty at some point becomes a choice, not a circumstance.

 

It is also a shame most of us have to pay a lot of money with views of the city they get for next to nothing, and our tax dollars just enable them to stay where they are. 

 

I don't like the mixed income idea either. That will just breed contempt between the haves and have nots. Mixed income neighborhoods rarely work. Someone making minimum wage is not going to feel comfortable living with those making $100,000.

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