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The Gulch Projects

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14 minutes ago, Craiger said:

You're right I was being a bit disingenuous with the tourist comment, but my point is that it is really just a small time saver. The Gulch is and should be it's own neighborhood with it's own amenities. Heck, it's one of the few urban neighborhoods with it's own grocery store already. It doesn't need to be 5 minutes "closer" to downtown to for anything other than a small bit of convenience for a small subset of the city's population. 

the bridge is certainly a "nice to have" not a "need to have". 

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1 hour ago, nashvylle said:

the bridge is certainly a "nice to have" not a "need to have". 

You may be right, but the city already decided that the bridge is a "going to have"  - which has led to land swapping behind cummins station and designs being drawn up for the station district that accommodate the bridge, both of which cost money and time (which equals money) that the city could be on the hook for if we decide to scrap the bridge.  I wouldn't be surprised if the W hotel and that new short brick building decided to get in on the lawsuit as well claiming that the pedestrian bridge was partially responsible for inducing their development construction.  I could be wrong, but my guess is that it would cost the city at least half as much to scrap the plan as it would to just build the thing.

That said, I do agree that holding off on it for the time being is probably a good move.  

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Just now, ruraljuror said:

You may be right, but the city already decided that the bridge is a "going to have"  - which has led to land swapping behind cummins station and designs being drawn up for the station district that accommodate the bridge, both of which cost money and time (which equals money) that the city could be on the hook for if we decide to scrap the bridge.  I wouldn't be surprised if the W hotel and that new short brick building decided to get in on the lawsuit as well claiming that the pedestrian bridge was partially responsible for inducing their development construction.  I could be wrong, but my guess is that it would cost the city at least half as much to scrap the plan as it would to just build the thing.

That said, I do agree that holding off on it for the time being is probably a good move.  

good point. I do not think it is scrapped indefinitely, but for the time being. 

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3 hours ago, Craiger said:

You're right I was being a bit disingenuous with the tourist comment, but my point is that it is really just a small time saver. The Gulch is and should be it's own neighborhood with it's own amenities. Heck, it's one of the few urban neighborhoods with it's own grocery store already. It doesn't need to be 5 minutes "closer" to downtown to for anything other than a small bit of convenience for a small subset of the city's population. 

Why not? Millions of dollars are spent to build and widen roads to save car commuters 5-10 minutes all the time.

Also, as I already mentioned above, I think the bridge would actually be used more by people in SoBro heading to the Gulch instead of the other way around. You're right that the Gulch is one of the few truly urban neighborhoods, and as other areas like SoBro grow with residents, they will need to access the Gulch's amenities until their own neighborhoods are fully developed with retail, full service restaurants, gyms, etc. instead of being geared to the 9-5 business crowd and/or convention-goers/tourists/special events.

As for the number of people it will service, that can be a slippery slope. I can assure you more people will use this than some of the roads are used in the outer areas of the county.

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Perhaps we could lease out the rights to access points to a private developer who could design & build an eye catching, SPECTACULAR bridge with an elevated observation platform. Let them charge a fee to cross the bridge and access the observation level for great photo opportunities. That provides the “connectivity” AND minimizes the potential for it becoming a haven for panhandlers or other unsavory characters.

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No offense, but if we are getting down to the psychological impact on tourists and wealthy six figure downtown residents, then I feel like you are now making my point for me. Should we name a few neighborhoods that have epidemic levels of mental health issues that could use a few million dollars to help address their mental health? 

What is so unpleasant about the Demonbreun street viaduct? Also, is that one the state is replacing or is that church and broadway? 

Maybe the city hires some psychologists to stage on either side of Demonbreun bridge to debrief the harrowing journey

 

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16 minutes ago, Craiger said:

No offense, but if we are getting down to the psychological impact on tourists and wealthy six figure downtown residents, then I feel like you are now making my point for me. Should we name a few neighborhoods that have epidemic levels of mental health issues that could use a few million dollars to help address their mental health? 

What is so unpleasant about the Demonbreun street viaduct? Also, is that one the state is replacing or is that church and broadway? 

Maybe the city hires some psychologists to stage on either side of Demonbreun bridge to debrief the harrowing journey

 

If you are were trying to reach East Nashville, and the distances were essentially the same, would you choose Woodland St. Bridge or Shelby Street Bridge? Most folks seem to choose Shelby Street.  I was just in NYC and often picked the slightly longer route to somewhere because the experience was simply better. I may not be sold on public funding for the walkway, but I do see the upsides. 

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1 hour ago, Craiger said:

No offense, but if we are getting down to the psychological impact on tourists and wealthy six figure downtown residents, then I feel like you are now making my point for me. Should we name a few neighborhoods that have epidemic levels of mental health issues that could use a few million dollars to help address their mental health? 

What is so unpleasant about the Demonbreun street viaduct? Also, is that one the state is replacing or is that church and broadway? 

Maybe the city hires some psychologists to stage on either side of Demonbreun bridge to debrief the harrowing journey

 

The Broadway viaduct is due for replacement. If the put stairs, which I think they will into the Gulch that will further help the issue. I have stopped many tourist looking to get from the Gulch to Broadway and told them they have to go up McGavock. They look at the map and think they can simply appear on Broadway 60 feet above them.

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The Gulch and SoBro crowd can pay for the bridge themselves. They simply need to cut back on the millions they spend on craft beer, smoothies, and gourmet coffee.

Edited by Ingram
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7 hours ago, Ingram said:

The Gulch and SoBro crowd can pay for the bridge themselves. They simply need to cut back on the millions they spend on craft beer, smoothies, and gourmet coffee.

Then it would be a bridge to nowhere after all the pubs, smoothie joints and coffee shops go out of business

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9 hours ago, Ingram said:

The Gulch and SoBro crowd can pay for the bridge themselves. They simply need to cut back on the millions they spend on craft beer, smoothies, and gourmet coffee.

LOVE this idea.  I agree 1 billion percent. 

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On 9/3/2019 at 8:56 AM, Ingram said:

The Gulch and SoBro crowd can pay for the bridge themselves. They simply need to cut back on the millions they spend on craft beer, smoothies, and gourmet coffee.

I voted for Cooper for this reason.  Our tax dollars should stay in our own communities and not used for downtown projects. 

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46 minutes ago, AronG said:

That's the funniest thing about the whole Cooper/neighborhood schtick. People really do somehow believe that the downtown area, the economic engine of the region, with tens of thousands of expensive residences and hundreds of thousands of high-end jobs, is mooching off of the areas of the county with like 2 houses per acre. Brilliant. It would be wonderful if an adult could explain to them that metro has to spend way more to support them than they generate; that a city block downtown generates more property tax than an exurb subdivision,  with a fraction of the road/power/water/infrastructure and much easier connection to existing grids and municipal services, etc.

People love it though. It jives perfectly with anti-new-Nashville-ism, and got him elected in a landslide, so you have to hand it to him. The funniest part of all is going to be watching him work to maintain this fiction over the next few years.

Been watching this from the tristate.....did not Briley mention any of this during the campaign? That if what is happening in downtown wasn't happening then the future of Nashville could be seen by making a trip up to the Rust Belt?

Middle Tennesseans need to be on their knees in gratitude for what's happening there-I know some of them have recently arrived from up here so they should know what the alternative is.

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Don't disagree with the points made above but Briley was not the mayor to lead Nashville forward. He's actually a very weak person... not a leader. And his mismanagement of the campaign in its last month should make every Nashvillian glad he was not reelected. I don't think Cooper is much better, but that is the state of the political situation in cities in America today. 

I found this report amusing because I know two of the 'elites' named in the report did in fact support Cooper.  One is a developer who also sits on the Metro Parks board who did NOT want Giarratana to get the Church Street park for his new residential tower. 

https://tennesseestar.com/2019/08/09/nashville-elite-reportedly-working-hard-to-get-nashville-mayor-david-briley-re-elected/

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