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Charlotte Ave/Charlotte Park/Sylvan Park/Bellevue/West Nash./Nations

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This is very exciting.  I hate that the church was destroyed but I'm so grateful there isn't a Rite Aide sitting on that corner.

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This is very exciting.  I hate that the church was destroyed but I'm so grateful there isn't a Rite Aide sitting on that corner.

You and me both brother. Would have been horrid. Looks as if we will have at least two new projects hopefully starting this year on the Charlotte corridor. I think the Hill project will start by mid year.

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There is also a planned two story development just down the street next door to LeQuire gallery. Permit calls for first floor retail and second floor law offices. Used to be Sons Upholstery in an old bungalow.

In regards to the church property, I'm very happy to see someone doing something that will fit with existing architecture/urban fabric. I was one of the more vocal opponents to the Rite Aid. So glad they backed out. I do hope that this will be mixed use and not just residential. Can't wait to see renderings.

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I hated to see that old bungalow next to the LeQuire Gallery be demolished.  It seemed to be structurally sound and had a lot of character.  I think it would have made a great tavern or bicycle shop.  I was thinking very seriously about opening an outfitter a while back and it was one of the places I had my eye on.

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The filling station/growler filling concept is really taking off in Nashville. It seems they are sprouting up everywhere.....which I am not complaining about at all.

 

Went to The Hop Stop the other night and filled up two growlers. Pretty great you don't have to trek to Frugals now.

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Went to The Hop Stop the other night and filled up two growlers. Pretty great you don't have to trek to Frugals now.

That building is owned by my family and it makes me incredibly happy how nice Jessie and the rest of the crew at The Hop Stop have made it.

It so beautiful on the inside.

Plus, they have Sprecher Hard Root Beer on tap and it....is....delicious.

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That building is owned by my family and it makes me incredibly happy how nice Jessie and the rest of the crew at The Hop Stop have made it.

It so beautiful on the inside.

Plus, they have Sprecher Hard Root Beer on tap and it....is....delicious.

 

Very cool bhibbs. They did do a great job and I'll be there often. Filled up on Mayday Evil Octopus and the 10 year Yazoo IPA. Both very good.

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I can't remember if this has been reported, but the Core Development project on 54th has started. Took a drive in Sylvan Park yesterday and there is a lot of tear down rebuilds in the area. Most of it looks pretty decent.

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Regarding the development at the corner of 46th/Charlotte...there was a representative at the most recent Sylvan Park Neighborhood Assoc meeting. I was out of town so couldn't attend, but this is what I gleaned from those who were in attendance:

 

two buildings...one will be a 4 story apt complex developed by stonehenge...80% 1BR/ 20% 2BR, roughly 170 units. Building will front Charlotte/46th. Second building will be one story retail fronting Charlotte to 45th...up to five tenants. Hope to learn more soon.

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Tennessean article on the Charlotte/46th development...a little more details

 

http://www.tennessean.com/article/20140218/BUSINESS02/302180022/2095/BUSINESS02

 

I wish they would include some affordable units in all of these apartment developments going up around town.

 

Are developers only required to have some affordable units in their development if they are receiving TIF or HUD Grants or something?

 

$1200 for a 400 sf apartment is pretty steep for your average working professional. I would think $800-950 for a 1 bd 400-600sf apartment would attract more recent college grads, and those make the median Nashville salary.

Edited by nashmoney
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I am looking forward to this development. I note that this developer is also responsible for hundreds of other apts. that have been recently built. Nice that they are going about their business...

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Tennessean article on the Charlotte/46th development...a little more details

 

http://www.tennessean.com/article/20140218/BUSINESS02/302180022/2095/BUSINESS02

 

I wish they would include some affordable units in all of these apartment developments going up around town.

 

Are developers only required to have some affordable units in their development if they are receiving TIF or HUD Grants or something?

 

$1200 for a 400 sf apartment is pretty steep for your average working professional. I would think $800-950 for a 1 bd 400-600sf apartment would attract more recent college grads, and those make the median Nashville salary.

 

And $500 would attract even more recent college grads! I think it is expensive too, and I think we will reach a point of saturation in the next 12-18 months, but for now that is the going rate and there are no shortage of people willing to pay that. They should charge as much as they can for each unit, its the only smart thing for them to do.

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And $500 would attract even more recent college grads! I think it is expensive too, and I think we will reach a point of saturation in the next 12-18 months, but for now that is the going rate and there are no shortage of people willing to pay that. They should charge as much as they can for each unit, its the only smart thing for them to do.

 

I agree....the laws of supply and demand at work. If I was a developer I would probably care less about affordable units...You're in it to win it!

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Tennessean article on the Charlotte/46th development...a little more details

 

http://www.tennessean.com/article/20140218/BUSINESS02/302180022/2095/BUSINESS02

 

I wish they would include some affordable units in all of these apartment developments going up around town.

 

Are developers only required to have some affordable units in their development if they are receiving TIF or HUD Grants or something?

 

$1200 for a 400 sf apartment is pretty steep for your average working professional. I would think $800-950 for a 1 bd 400-600sf apartment would attract more recent college grads, and those make the median Nashville salary.

There presently is nothing on the books requiring developers to have any affordable housing units.  The TIF/HUD grants may have that stipulation.  But I have sat through numerous Planning Commission hearings where people want to bring up price and the legal counsel to the Planning Commission clarifies that Equal Housing laws prevent the Planning Commission from considering price, tenure, or ownership status in approving plans.  Metro used to get in trouble because people would protest putting "affordable" or "low income" housing in their neighborhoods, and people would and did sue Metro for violation of Equal Housing laws.  The irony is that the same laws that prevented that criterion in decision making also prevent the Planning Commission from voting down developments whose price is considerably higher than the median for the area.  The Equal Housing laws work both ways.

 

On the other hand, I have heard Planning Commissioners state from the bench that other cities are figuring out ways to incorporate affordable housing and that Nashville ought to do something similar but has not done so as yet.

 

Right now, the only way to help ensure that there are affordable units is to file a Specific Plan (SP) that includes a mix of housing sizes.  So in exchange for increased density, you can get smaller sized-housing units.  The tendency in real estate to price things by the square foot suggests that smaller units will sell for less than larger units in the same development.

Edited by bwithers1

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There presently is nothing on the books requiring developers to have any affordable housing units.  The TIF/HUD grants may have that stipulation.  But I have sat through numerous Planning Commission hearings where people want to bring up price and the legal counsel to the Planning Commission clarifies that Equal Housing laws prevent the Planning Commission from considering price, tenure, or ownership status in approving plans.  Metro used to get in trouble because people would protest putting "affordable" or "low income" housing in their neighborhoods, and people would and did sue Metro for violation of Equal Housing laws.  The irony is that the same laws that prevented that criterion in decision making also prevent the Planning Commission from voting down developments whose price is considerably higher than the median for the area.  The Equal Housing laws work both ways.

 

On the other hand, I have heard Planning Commissioners state from the bench that other cities are figuring out ways to incorporate affordable housing and that Nashville ought to do something similar but has not done so as yet.

 

Right now, the only way to help ensure that there are affordable units is to file a Specific Plan (SP) that includes a mix of housing sizes.  So in exchange for increased density, you can get smaller sized-housing units.  The tendency in real estate to price things by the square foot suggests that smaller units will sell for less than larger units in the same development.

 

Thanks for that explanation and helping me understand the process better!

 

I read an article in the Tennessean yesterday about a developer looking to put affordable units on a lot at West Trinity lane and 65S. That developer would be receiving an MDHA grant and HUD loans, so I think you are right about those organizations giving funds and having those stipulations.

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I think location is going to have a lot to do with what drives 'affordable' developments. In the hottest areas, the inclusion of (more) affordable units cuts into profits, which I would imagine developers do not fancy. If they think they can get $1,000+ for a 1BR 400 sq ft unit, then they will. So perhaps what metro should encourage would be more affordable housing in the fringe 'hot' areas. That could go a long way to help boost some of the corridors that need a little more love (i.e. Dickerson Rd, Nolensville Rd, Lafayette St, etc).

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Cottage developments have been one increasingly popular method for developers to cut costs and add smaller detached homes on one larger parcel. 

 

I am wondering what the square footage/pricing will be like for the H.G. Hill project at Charlotte near 42nd.  I think that there are quite a few units there, but I suspect that some of those will be at the lower end of the SF range.  It's kind of crazy that in the urban core neighborhoods new construction "affordable housing" means anything under $300K.  So $289 is the new "affordable"!

Edited by bwithers1

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From WW at the Post, the One City developers are planning to go taller than 12 stories (possibly 15 stories). Vote on March 27. It will be interesting to see  Charlotte Pike get taller as one goes west toward I-440, from the low rise Parallon and Sarah Cannon Research Institute complex (a'la West End from the sub-sea level hole that Palmer has "built" lol). 

 

http://nashvillepost.com/news/2014/2/21/one_city_developer_seeks_height_limit_increase_for_future_buildings

Edited by MLBrumby
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From WW at the Post, the One City developers are planning to go taller than 12 stories (possibly 15 stories). Vote on March 27. It will be interesting to see  Charlotte Pike get taller as one goes west toward I-440, from the low rise Parallon and Sarah Cannon Research Institute complex (a'la West End from the sub-sea level hole that Palmer has "built" lol)

 

http://nashvillepost.com/news/2014/2/21/one_city_developer_seeks_height_limit_increase_for_future_buildings

 

Y'all crack on Palmer too much. It's all funny, but that was probably the best. 

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