smeagolsfree

Charlotte Park/Sylvan Park/Bellevue/West Nash./Nations

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Trying to figure out where this is in relation to the sheds... to the west or the east (where the big sandstone mid-century building sits).  

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Trying to figure out where this is in relation to the sheds... to the west or the east (where the big sandstone mid-century building sits).  

 

If I'm not mistaken, west of the sheds. East of the sheds would be @ 22nd. The mid century building (TDOT) is probably going to be razed as part of the sheds development.

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Hooray for Sylvan Heights!  This could kind of bridge the gap between I-440 and Sylvan Park on the other side of the railroad tracks.  This will mesh nicely with that former bakery redevelopment site nearby just on the Sylvan Park side of the tracks.  Charlotte Pike is coming along quite nicely!

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This is huge for Charlotte. I know it's been discussed before that Charlotte isn't seeing the kind of multifamily boom that is happening in some of the other *hot* areas...well this type of thing could really help change that. Slowly but surely, I think we'll see bits and pieces of the "junk" chipped away from Charlotte. It's not going to be West End Ave by any stretch, but I think we're going to see some major changes in the next decade or so.

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Posting another pic of the location from this publication...  http://charlotteave.blogspot.com/2013/09/hg-hill-ready-to-talk-about-development.html

 

HGHill_40thAve.jpg

 

The houses south of 40th avenue are also in the footprint of the development. 

 

This project is going to have a major impact on Charlotte and Sylvan Heights.  Once this development gets out of the ground I think we will see several more developers jump on board in the area.  Developers are scared to be first in but successful development begets successful development.  This and One C1ty will be game changers.  Charlotte has a long way to go but its also a 7 mile corridor, unlike 12South which is composed of a few blocks in a neighborhood on a 2 lane road.  I grew up in The Nations (not Historic West Town) so I'm pretty excited to see the area start to get a little love.

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i love using that carwash, but... GOOD RIDDANCE!

eric b

 

I liked using that same carwash as well until I started going to Cameron Express on White Bridge, but this new development makes better use of the property than what was already there, IMO. Good to see some new infill development on that end of Charlotte.

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The houses south of 40th avenue are also in the footprint of the development. 

 

Doesn't 40th run N-S?

 

Also, am I the only one unhappy with site drawing both lacking a North arrow and not having North as up?

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Doesn't 40th run N-S?

 

Also, am I the only one unhappy with site drawing both lacking a North arrow and not having North as up?

That screen shot is kind of facing south from Charlotte, so it is almost upside down.  You are correct 40th Ave does run north-south and Charlotte runs east-west.  So the development site is west of 40th and south of Charlotte.

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Speaking of "The Nations"... I thought that was a topic on this thread... here are a couple news pieces regarding more new developments in the area. 

 

From the Tennessean... http://www.tennessean.com/article/20131111/BUSINESS02/311110024/2095/BUSINESS02

 

From NBJ...  http://www.bizjournals.com/nashville/morning_call/2013/11/booming-west-nashville-neighborhood.html

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When did "starter homes" start going for $275k to 300k? I was happy to buy my East Nashville fixer upper for under 100k in 2006 at the height of that housing boom.

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When did "starter homes" start going for $275k to 300k? I was happy to buy my East Nashville fixer upper for under 100k in 2006 at the height of that housing boom.

I agree with you, but even in East Nashville, there is a big difference between the pricing for existing homes and new construction homes. I think that the Chicamauga Ave Townhomes across from the Eastland Kroger are priced in the mid-$200s. They are smaller, but they do have 2 car garages underneath off the alley. Otherwise, the lowest new construction that I have seen in the last year is $289. That's why in my neighborhood developers are paying as much as $165K for existing houses and tearing them down to be replaced by new construction at a much higher price. Several new construction homes in Eastwood have sold for around $450K. Even some of the ugly duplexes are selling for $390 each side. Up in South Inglewood, there is a development going in on Creighton off of Porter right next to the railroad tracks with each home selling in the mid-$300s. That's not a prime location.

 

In my experience, new construction homes sell at much higher prices per square foot even than 100% renovated existing homes. Folks who want the genuinely historic restored homes or especially the fixer-uppers are a totally separate market from the market for new construction. Lots of the families that I see moving in have children, so they want everything ready to go and don't want to hassle with replacing stuff or having tools lying around.

 

I'm still left wondering where all of these families "starting out" are getting the income that is required to pay the mortgage on a $300K+ house. 

Edited by bwithers1

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I agree with you, but even in East Nashville, there is a big difference between the pricing for existing homes and new construction homes. I think that the Chicamauga Ave Townhomes across from the Eastland Kroger are priced in the mid-$200s. They are smaller, but they do have 2 car garages underneath off the alley. Otherwise, the lowest new construction that I have seen in the last year is $289. That's why in my neighborhood developers are paying as much as $165K for existing houses and tearing them down to be replaced by new construction at a much higher price. Several new construction homes in Eastwood have sold for around $450K. Even some of the ugly duplexes are selling for $390 each side. Up in South Inglewood, there is a development going in on Creighton off of Porter right next to the railroad tracks with each home selling in the mid-$300s. That's not a prime location.

 

In my experience, new construction homes sell at much higher prices per square foot even than 100% renovated existing homes. Folks who want the genuinely historic restored homes or especially the fixer-uppers are a totally separate market from the market for new construction. Lots of the families that I see moving in have children, so they want everything ready to go and don't want to hassle with replacing stuff or having tools lying around.

 

I'm still left wondering where all of these families "starting out" are getting the income that is required to pay the mortgage on a $300K+ house. 

 

I think there are plenty of people out there that can "afford" payments on a $300K mortgage. 

 

Are those same people saving for retirement, investing, establishing a rainy day fund, paying off large chunks of their student debt? That's another story. 

 

For some people what they can afford is based on their lifestyle and value system. For others it is simply how far can i stretch my paycheck month to month.

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Well, part of it may be a generational thing.

Traditionally, a started home was bought by a early 20's, freshly married couple. These days, many people are holding out into their 30's to buy a house and start a family. Many are in their 30's, and have established careers. Yes, they can afford to buy a modest home while still paying off student loans, building 401k, and saving for a family.

Not everyone falls into the same category, but a predominantly higher percentage of Gen-Y'ers are doing this, as opposed to generations before them. I expect the millennials will do the same.

Edited by nashvillwill

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Ahhh, THE NATIONS!
 
http://www.nashville.com/news/nashville-business-news/the-nations-neighborhood-in-nashville-sees-tremendous-growth

 

http://www.newschannel5.com/story/23951542/neighbors-in-the-nations-want-progress-without-problems

 
Although, this seems hard to imagine...
 

One developer has proposed building 63 single family homes on a vacant 5.5 acre lot at 60th Avenue and Morrow Road.


How?

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"These are geared for people making 45 to 60,000 a year," said Bill Hostettler from HND Realty, the town home developer. "But we don't want that," said a resident. "Ok, I'm happy leaving it a lumber yard," Hostettler responded.

 

 

Hah, I LOVE that response.

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Hah, I LOVE that response.

 

I don't get this. Are homes for the middle class (Davidson County Median Household Income is around $45k) not good enough for them? Or are they simply NIMBY and opposed to anything and everything?

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I don't get this. Are homes for the middle class (Davidson County Median Household Income is around $45k) not good enough for them? Or are they simply NIMBY and opposed to anything and everything?

 

Could be NIMBY, could be that they would rather not have that many houses crammed into that amount of land. Those are 3,800 sq ft lots WITHOUT any sort of parking or driveways figured in.

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I would guess that that statement is more of an anti-gentrification sentiment, most likely made by someone below that income level.

Let's be honest. Some people are hurt by gentrification. I would say (and I have no facts to back any of this up), that a high majority of people benefit from gentrification. But as property values and taxes rise and rents rise, some people are priced right out of their own neighborhoods. It's unfortunate, but true.

In Oakland, CA, I've seen organized groups, and advertisement, with the mission to prevent gentrification.

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I would guess that that statement is more of an anti-gentrification sentiment, most likely made by someone below that income level.

Let's be honest. Some people are hurt by gentrification. I would say (and I have no facts to back any of this up), that a high majority of people benefit from gentrification. But as property values and taxes rise and rents rise, some people are priced right out of their own neighborhoods. It's unfortunate, but true.

In Oakland, CA, I've seen organized groups, and advertisement, with the mission to prevent gentrification.

 

That's exactly what it is. I saw TONS of it in Philadelphia. The way it worked there was as follows: development begins in earnest in a neighborhood; developer starts planning buildings in disused or underutilized blocks in adjacent neighborhood to take advantage of newfound desireability; politician or other individual with a vested interest in keeping the neighborhood at its low level stirs up discontent and resentment; a small, yet very vocal, minority do everything they can to sling mud on the plan.

 

How often are people actually forced to leave neighborhoods they have spent their lives in? And are the people that are being forced to leave grandma and grandpa who can't make ends meet, a family just trying to get by, or the type of people who do not necessarily wish to see a better neighborhood for reasons other than inability to pay new rents or taxes?  I know I sound like I'm coming off on the side of development (I am, I guess...), but this is an honest question, and I'd really like to see some studies done on it.

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