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Phd in Urban planning ...help


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Hello 

 

I'm looking to do my Phd in Urban Planning or any related degrees , I want a school that does NOT require a GRE for admission .

 

I'm looking for schools preferbly around California,florida,NY,MA . or even if you have any experience with programs abroad that do not have tough admission requirements. 

 

 

Thanks a ton 

 

 

 

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