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More Accolades for Nashville


Guest 5th & Main Urbanite

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54 minutes ago, bnacincy said:

I will speak my truth: I was born a Mid-Southerner and not a Deep Southerner.

National Geographic has failed me!:tw_cold_sweat:

If you ask Birmingham, Nashville is mid South. If you ask Indianapolis, Nashville is deep South. It’s all in the perspective.

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If you ask Birmingham, Nashville is mid South. If you ask Indianapolis, Nashville is deep South. It’s all in the perspective.

I’m sure there is some semi-official definition somewhere, but I always considered the Deep South as South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana. I wonder if it would be historically accurate, but I wouldn’t consider Florida to be included. And I would think of North Carolina, Tennessee, and Arkansas as the mid-south. Just one person’s perspective … Curious if there is some official definition somewhere.
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I lived in Memphis for a few years, where every other business is Mid-South Something or Other (unless it's Bluff City Something or Other). I've always interpreted "Mid South" as an east-west thing. The Memphis area and the Mississippi Valley are the Mid South because they lie between the Western South (Texas and perhaps Oklahoma) and the Eastern Seaboard South. Wikipedia doesn't quite agree with that definition, centering the region on Memphis instead of the whole Mississippi Valley: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mid-South_(region). In any case it doesn't include North Carolina or Virginia or the Appalachian portions of Kentucky and Tennessee.

The first terms I think of for the non-Deep South part of the South are "Upper South" or "Upland South", which you run into in cultural studies, linguistics, biology and geology.

•  Country musicians, for example, generally have an Upland Southern or Appalachian accent, which is a world away from Scarlett O'Hara's Lowland Southern or Deep South accent. 
•  The flora and fauna of the Upland South are pretty different from the Lowland South.
•  Historically the Deep South was strongly influence by the plantation economy; the Upper South much less so.

"Upland South" could be defined so that it follows state lines (AR, TN, KY, VA, NC), or it could be defined as everything above the Fall Line. Here's the Wikipedia entry: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Upland_South.  I think I've also seen "Mountain South" used to refer more or less the same region. The historical term "Border States" occurred to me, but doesn't really work since it would omit Arkansas, Tennessee, Virginia and North Carolina.

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11 minutes ago, donNdonelson2 said:

I remember going to the Mid-South Fair in Memphis.

And it was such a fun fair!

When I lived in Memphis I noticed that the weather people on every TV station referred to Memphis as "the Mid-South" ("Today in the Mid-South the weather will be...").

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6 hours ago, natethegreat said:

Memphis is Deep South 

Memphis and West Tennessee certainly feel like the Deep South even if geographically in the Mid South.

Sadly,  its economic situation is more like the Deep South than the rest of Tennessee.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Nashville led the nation in new construction growth rates in the multifamily sector, according to a new report from multifamily specialists Walker & Dunlop.

More behind the Nashville Post paywall here:

https://www.nashvillepost.com/business/development/report-nashville-s-multifamily-sector-leads-the-nation/article_81180800-e27e-11ec-af2b-fb2c34280ec3.html

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2 hours ago, markhollin said:

Nashville ranked #4 in nation for building new homes in first quarter of 2022 according to Redfin.

More at NBJ here:

https://www.bizjournals.com/nashville/news/2022/06/10/nashville-new-homes-building-home-prices-redfin.html

I wonder if these statistics were cumlative or per capita.  If cumlative, I wonder if Nashville would have ranked higher against larger cities.

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The Nashville lodging market’s revenue per available room — a metric used to calculate the hospitality industry’s health — is expected to increase 33.2% to $110.96 by the end of this year, according to research from CBRE Inc. That figure would be up from $83.33 a year earlier and greater than the national average of $72.20 seen in this year’s first quarter. The momentum is expected to carry into 2023.

More at NBJ here:

https://www.bizjournals.com/nashville/news/2022/06/10/deal-dash-portman-residential.html

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Clickbait that appeared in my Facebook feed from some outfit called National Mortgage News.  They have Nashville #1 in their list of "12 hottest housing markets in 2022."

  1. Nashville
  2. Raleigh-Durham
  3. Phoenix
  4. Austin
  5. Tampa-St Pete
  6. Charlotte
  7. Dallas-Ft Worth
  8. Atlanta
  9. Seattle
  10. Boston
  11. Salt Lake
  12. Denver

https://www.nationalmortgagenews.com/list/the-12-hottest-housing-markets-in-2022

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