cltbwimob

Patrick Cannon...Charlotte's new --> old mayor

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I don't know. The GOP is putting tons of money and troops on tHe ground for Peacock. I want Cannon to win, but I'm not counting Peacock out

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With these off-year elections, turnout is critical.  Where a presidental election might see 65%+, these odd-year city contests are usually 20% or less. 

 

Four years ago, Foxx beat Lassiter 55,265 to 51,931, a small margin of victory over an well-known moderate republican.    

 

Two years later, Foxx beat Stone 56,252 to 26,985.  That there were nearly 27,000 people who bothered to go to the polls to vote for Stone (a complete unknown who barely campaigned and who I recall sounded very conservative and almost anti-Charlotte) suggests to me that the republicans do have a decent base of committed voters in the city.  

 

Peacock is pretty well known, is clearly committed to this race and is quite moderate for a republican.  Recall that he was the only candidate in that congressional primary last year who came out against amendment 1.   I don't think this is an automatic win for Cannon.  

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In the show The West Wing, Toby made Sam go outside in 13 degree weather and spin around three times to counter the bad jinx Sam placed on something when he predicted it as passing without worry.     :whistling:

 

I really can't say this is a clear-cut Cannon win myself in advance.  I agree with the sentiment that Peacock is not to be discounted and some of the strongest turn out districts in general in the city are Southside where I believe Peacock leads.

 

Put it another way.  If it wasn't for Peacock's stance against the streetcar he would be my prefered candidate right now...

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This is directly from Peacock's website.  Regardless of your party, AT LEAST we have two people running that are both "pro-mass transit".  Peacock just lowers the priority of Street car (albeit, immensely).  That's not to say I agree or disagree, it's just good to see we've gotten past "RAIL vs. ROADS" to "Type of rail vs. Type of rail".

 

TRANSPORTATION- Mobility is essential for a fast growing city like Charlotte.  With mobility comes the ability to get citizens to & from our economic centers with greater ease.  Private sector job creation is fueled by a multi-modal approach to transit.  Our transit approach must embrace the REGIONAL partnership we’ve formed with the MTC and we must honor the promise we’ve given to our partners in the MTC.  Our priorities must remain the expansion of our bus system, the completion of the light rail to UNCC, the expansion of rail to Huntersville, Cornelius, & Davidson and then the streetcar.  Our next Mayor must be a strong partner in the conversation. 

 

 

 

Edit:  Also, this is just an observation, but Cannon's website is an awful mess.  His "results" page reads like a poorly crafted resume.  http://www.cannonformayor.com/results/   Too much on the page for the general voter.  Again, just an observation.

Edited by ah59396

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I dont buy his pro-transit stance for the fact that he said we have promises to MTC.

That sounds like a GOP code word for appease the pro-transit crowd & oppose funding for the transit appealing to the anti--transit base.

I want to hear a plan how to fund mass transit; not a wish list. MTC 1/2 cent tax funds are exhausted due to the recession.

Edited by AirNostrumMAD
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To build upon my earlier post, where I did specify streetcar and not his general mass transit views, I'm talking about his statements in the Observer
 

Peacock, ... told bar members that he has questioned financing of the proposed streetcar...

 

...he has said it leapfrogged other projects and bypassed a regional transportation planning group.

 

He said the controversial project also jeopardizes support for a broader transportation plan...

 

 

This to me sounds a lot like McCrory recently in Raleigh and I agree it with AirNostrumMAD that there's some code speak in there I'm not clicking with.   

 

Like I said - if it wasn't for this, he would be my preferred candidate right now.   Truth is I haven't decided who I am voting for, but this issue is one that is more than just symbolic in my mind.

 

Edit - I just looked at Peacock's site and the same page that talks about transportation in general also has this the below.   

What about the streetcar?

I’m pro mass transit. However, I do not agree with the City Council’s decision to use $63,000,000 of unspent property tax reserves for a controversial streetcar project. This streetcar is currently the lowest regional transit priority. And remember, this property tax expenditure is contingent upon the US Department of Transportation committing another $63,000,000 of your tax dollars. Rather than squander property tax reserves, the next Mayor of Charlotte must embrace a fiscally sound multi-modal transit plan that honors our established regional priorities and focuses on traffic congestion relief.

 

Double Edit:  I just looked at Cannon's site and agree it is horrible and looks more like a first time city council race sise than one for an experienced politician now running for Mayor.  

 

On a related note - who came up with his logo?  

Am I alone seeing the subtle joke and play on words provided by the color switch in his name: 
CANNON   It seems like it is asking and answering a subliminal question about his candidacy.

Edited by Urbanity

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I recall hearing something similar from Michael Barnes (democrat district rep on city council and currently running at large).  One reason he said that he voted against the streetcar was that it might jeopardize state funding of the BLE.  If the legislature sensed that the city could find transit money under the couch cushions, they might refuse to fund the state's share of the light rail extension.  We're past that, right?  

 

Going forward -- especially after the airport takeover -- I am worried that if the city builds the streetcar on its own, outside of the MTC, and angers a critical mass of legislators from municipalities outside of Charlotte, the MTC and the 1/2 sales tax authority might simply be repealed by the legislature.  Or perhaps a slightly rosier scenario: the legislature refuses to ever expand that sales tax and refuses to help fund any additional transit projects in Charlotte ever.  

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I emailed Peacock directly to ask him about several things: transit, the airport, and whether or not he will tow his party's line on social issues (LGBT, religion in politics, etc).  I was impressed that I got a response within a day; he didn't shy away from directly answering my concerns.  He told me that he does not agree with the GOP on most social issues and will not cave to the state or national party's platform on such.  That said, the following day I read the article in the Observer about how big GOP money and "help" was flowing in from both national and state orgs.  With that news, I have decided to go with Cannon--who, by the way, doesn't really excite me much either.  Lesser of two evils.

 

Edit: And yes, Cannon's website is awful.

Edited by Miesian Corners

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I emailed Peacock directly to ask him about several things: transit, the airport, and whether or not he will tow his party's line on social issues (LGBT, religion in politics, etc).  I was impressed that I got a response within a day; he didn't shy away from directly answering my concerns.  He told me that he does not agree with the GOP on most social issues and will not cave to the state or national party's platform on such.  That said, the following day I read the article in the Observer about how big GOP money and "help" was flowing in from both national and state orgs.  With that news, I have decided to go with Cannon--who, by the way, doesn't really excite me much either.  Lesser of two evils.

 

Edit: And yes, Cannon's website is awful.

 

Any chance you can post the email so we can read it? You should be able to retract any personal identifying information.

 

Side note: Peacock reminds me of Tom Carcetti from the Wire. I know little about his political career, but that's just the feeling I get. Both candidates, for that matter, seem more into using Charlotte as a stepping stone instead of directing the City for the next decade.

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As far as LGBT issues you can read the QNotes interviews with each candidate which came out last week,

 

Personally I am heartened that we have two very good candidates in general.   What I wish was that Charlotte had a stronger Mayoral position in general and less strong city manager position.

 

Edit - fixed link

 

Double Edit - They talk about more than LGBT issues in the interviews btw.

Edited by Urbanity

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What I wish was that Charlotte had a stronger Mayoral position in general and less strong city manager position.

 

Yes, so we could then vote for Ron Carlee :)

haha I'm a fan.

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In related Mayor news.  Neither candidate were endorsed by MeckPAC the local LGBT Political action committee.

 

While most other endorsed candidates were Democrats they did also endorsed a Republican, a Libertarian and an Independent

 

Source: QNotes

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The Observer endorsed Peacock.

Is that the same Observer that endorsed McCrory for Gov?

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The editiorial article supporting Peacock for those who want to read:

 

http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2013/10/26/4415490/why-edwin-peacock-is-the-best.html#.Umx5BpRgaR0

 

I personally agree with the board on this one, and support Peacock as well.  My main reservation is what might be his reluctancy to continue to invest in the community (infrastructure, business recruitment, etc)

 

This is a pretty critical point for Charlotte in my opinion, as the country/state/city slowly recover.  Can Charlotte hit the gas pedal and once again outgain the country in growth, or does it settle in like an Indianapolis, Columbus, Portland, etc...nice places without top-tier ambitions.

 

 

Is that the same Observer that endorsed McCrory for Gov?

 

 

I think the Observer's support for McCrory was filled with caveats, much more so than their pretty blanket support for Peacock.  It's not like the editorial board is a bastion for conservative viewpoints. :ermm:

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I respect you guys a lot & I think all of us are generally in the same page of what we want for CLT, so I have to ask;

Why peacock instead of Cannon? I read the article, but it lacked any meaningful detail.

One thing that makes me nervous is streetcar will be doomed and the starter line will be viewed as a failure and a waiste & it will take decades to ever connect Plaza with rail.

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One thing that makes me nervous is streetcar will be doomed and the starter line will be viewed as a failure and a waiste & it will take decades to ever connect Plaza with rail.

 

That has been the sole reason that I have had misgivings on Peacock (as already mentioned).  Fact is that if it weren't for that, there wouldn't even be a debate in my mind. 

What I do like most about Peacock is he symbolizes what was great about North Carolina and Charlotte, and in some ways sparks a hope of what can be again - the moderate; the consensus; the less partisan.

 

Peacock came out against Amendment One knowing he was going to run for mayor.  Some may say that is no risk for someone running for a mayor of urban city that is relatively gay friendly, but he still had to win a primary first.  He had no idea how the State GOP (which has become very partisan conservative) would react and was opening himself up for a party backed challenge.  So I am impressed.  

 

I also am likely to give him the benefit of the doubt about his intentions as far as being in the role of Mayor to do something for the city even if it is in conflict with the State (GOP controlled) Government.

 

One thing I don't like about Cannon is symbolic - his website.  Bear with me - but there is so little effort there.  It is so amateur.  It's like he feels that the Democrat candidate is guaranteed the Mayor role and he doesn't need to expend too much effort in selling himself to the city. You could claim I am reading into it (and maybe too much) and you are probably right - but that perception is there and it has yet to go away; In an election where both candidates are close on most issues that perception weighs heavier than it would otherwise.

 

I don't know yet who I am voting for on election day.  If Peacock would come out strong on what he plans to do on the streetcar question (a funding solution) my decision would be made.

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I'm not that concerned about the streetcar aspect.  I think Phase 2 is an important project, but probably not critical, and not as high of a priority than true "mass transit", which I think is consistent with what Peacock believes (I think).

 

I'm a registered independent who loathes partisan politics, and it seems to me, that anyone who votes cross aisles on issues and can compromise is exactly what we had for many years here.  McCrory, Vinroot, Myrick were all very very moderate on most issues, and worked in Charlotte's best interest. 

 

I would generally describe myself as dead center on social policy issues, left of center of infrastructure/basic services fiscal spending, and right of center of entitlement spending.  I typically skew from just right of center at the national level to just left of center at the local level, believing local people should have the greatest say in the re-allocation of their taxes.

 

While that characterization would indicate I would support Cannon, I feel that local democrats are horribly un-alligned and just as distrustful of their own party as they are of local republicans.  Fallon and Pickering don't care one bit about local infrastructure or economic growth and are centered around social issues, Howard, Kinsey, and Autry are fairly balanced, and Mayfield and Barnes seem like crony politicians at their best. 

 

Foxx, to the disagreement of some on here, I feel was a failure in everything except self promotion.  He couldn't get concensus on a capital plan for the first time ever, he effectively lost the airport, and I can't point to one pivitol point in the city's evolution that he championed (I'm going to credit Burgess for the DNC). 

 

Cannon has accoring to several Observer articles, done little to build consensus within his own party.  I'm looking for a moderate who knows that on every important issue, he is going to have to work to build consensus by convincing everyone its the right thing for the city, as opposed to closed door partisan wheeling and dealing.

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I'm not that concerned about the streetcar aspect.  I think Phase 2 is an important project, but probably not critical, and not as high of a priority than true "mass transit", which I think is consistent with what Peacock believes (I think).

 

I'm a registered independent who loathes partisan politics, and it seems to me, that anyone who votes cross aisles on issues and can compromise is exactly what we had for many years here.  McCrory, Vinroot, Myrick were all very very moderate on most issues, and worked in Charlotte's best interest. 

 

I would generally describe myself as dead center on social policy issues, left of center of infrastructure/basic services fiscal spending, and right of center of entitlement spending.  I typically skew from just right of center at the national level to just left of center at the local level, believing local people should have the greatest say in the re-allocation of their taxes.

 

While that characterization would indicate I would support Cannon, I feel that local democrats are horribly un-alligned and just as distrustful of their own party as they are of local republicans.  Fallon and Pickering don't care one bit about local infrastructure or economic growth and are centered around social issues, Howard, Kinsey, and Autry are fairly balanced, and Mayfield and Barnes seem like crony politicians at their best. 

 

Foxx, to the disagreement of some on here, I feel was a failure in everything except self promotion.  He couldn't get concensus on a capital plan for the first time ever, he effectively lost the airport, and I can't point to one pivitol point in the city's evolution that he championed (I'm going to credit Burgess for the DNC). 

 

Cannon has accoring to several Observer articles, done little to build consensus within his own party.  I'm looking for a moderate who knows that on every important issue, he is going to have to work to build consensus by convincing everyone its the right thing for the city, as opposed to closed door partisan wheeling and dealing.

Very well said. The voters have a responsibility here too. It's not, what is best for me (or my pet political issues), but who would do the best job for Charlotte in the most well rounded way. Sadly, I don't see much mention of that usually.

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I'm not that concerned about the streetcar aspect.  I think Phase 2 is an important project, but probably not critical, and not as high of a priority than true "mass transit", which I think is consistent with what Peacock believes (I think).

 

I'm a registered independent who loathes partisan politics, and it seems to me, that anyone who votes cross aisles on issues and can compromise is exactly what we had for many years here.  McCrory, Vinroot, Myrick were all very very moderate on most issues, and worked in Charlotte's best interest. 

 

I would generally describe myself as dead center on social policy issues, left of center of infrastructure/basic services fiscal spending, and right of center of entitlement spending.  I typically skew from just right of center at the national level to just left of center at the local level, believing local people should have the greatest say in the re-allocation of their taxes.

 

While that characterization would indicate I would support Cannon, I feel that local democrats are horribly un-alligned and just as distrustful of their own party as they are of local republicans.  Fallon and Pickering don't care one bit about local infrastructure or economic growth and are centered around social issues, Howard, Kinsey, and Autry are fairly balanced, and Mayfield and Barnes seem like crony politicians at their best. 

 

Foxx, to the disagreement of some on here, I feel was a failure in everything except self promotion.  He couldn't get concensus on a capital plan for the first time ever, he effectively lost the airport, and I can't point to one pivitol point in the city's evolution that he championed (I'm going to credit Burgess for the DNC). 

 

Cannon has accoring to several Observer articles, done little to build consensus within his own party.  I'm looking for a moderate who knows that on every important issue, he is going to have to work to build consensus by convincing everyone its the right thing for the city, as opposed to closed door partisan wheeling and dealing.

Spot on in my opinion.

 

I'm also not all that concerned with streetcar. If the starter line is successful in spurring development along its route in Elizabeth (god knows there is plenty of land to develop into a great neighborhood), then it will get the support it deserves in the future. 

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Hmmm I'm of mixed opinion about some of the replies so far.   I absolutely agree that you don't choose a mayor over a single issue, but I'm kind of perplexed that this board is poking the streetcar issue as if it were a single issue.  

For clarification since a few of you seem to be misunderstanding my point: It's not really about the streetcar - it's about investment in city projects that show a willingness to be a little bold; to show some risk in your reputation for a better city; and it also is an acknowledgment that the East and West of Charlotte deserve the same infrastructure focus as South Charlotte.

 

As I stated many times I still haven't decided and I lean even more to Peacock after hearing about Cannon's comments about Peacock hating Charlotte, but I got to say I'm a little surprised that this board is not recognizing the streetcar issue is more that a street tram vanity project...

 

Frankly I would expect to hear some of these comments on the Observer board.

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and it also is an acknowledgment that the East and West of Charlotte deserve the same infrastructure focus as South Charlotte.

As I stated many times I still haven't decided and I lean even more to Peacock after hearing about Cannon's comments about Peacock hating Charlotte, but I got to say I'm a little surprised that this board is not recognizing the streetcar issue is more that a street tram vanity project...

Frankly I would expect to hear some of these comments on the Observer board.

I think your last assertion is a little unfair. Just because some on this board are either ambivalent or opposed to the streetcar project does not mean that they have voiced their opinion in a manner consistent with those from the comments section on the Observer. It is by no means fair to suggest that the valid concerns of some on this board regarding the streetcar should somehow be grouped with those commenters from the Observer who shamelessly expectorate diarrhea of the brain upon the masses of CO readers.

You are right to say that East and West Charlotte deserve the same attention as Northeast and South Charlotte. I submit that even if the streetcar is built as planned, the investment in those corridors will likely fall short of the Blue Line/BLE from both a public and private standpoint. Streetcar is not the same as Light Rail no matter how you frame it.

Sorry for veering a little off topic. I personally would not mind if either of these candidates became the next mayor, although I am concerned that Peacock does not recognize the value of having the Panthers here vice LA.

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^ To me, his opposition to streetcar is symbolic to other positions he might take like your mentioning of the Panthers among other things such as his position on Studio Charlotte, his thoughts on BB&T ball park, thoughts on Amatuer sports complex, etc.

I'm not in the mood for a mayor of No. Not saying he is or woud be.

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