gman

Camperdown (Greenville News Building Site)

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That company buying that piece of property is an outstanding developer. If they are going to build here, its not going to be crap. They have a pretty good track record as far as quality developements. Its obvious they already have the plans. The public is just going to have to wait to see them.

Im going to make this predictions. Watch out for the parking lot across the street. It won't stay empty long. I don't know anything. It's just have a gut feeling. I just know someone's been looking at it. But like i said. I don't know anything.

 

The problem with the lot is that it has several owners...including the City. 

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^^^ Well ausrutherford I think the right situation may have come where all the property owners may want to think about selling. If they were waiting for a better time to do it. This is it. That property, while thinking about it the liquor store and all the property behind the Greenville News, will all be in high demand. I'm pretty sure the city is already talking to the about this very thing. They already see the wind of change. Even if most of us don't. It's going to be like how the One project had folk thinking about how can we improve our property.  

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The dominoes are starting to fall. When we saw the plans for this, i knew this building on the square was inevitable. People are trying to get in before things get to expensive. Look for others.

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I wonder what the chances are that this will have some height to it. I'm talking 20+.

 

Well the odds in my opinion are......... very, very slim. Just looking at the size of the property, 4+ acres is alot of space, for a building with 20+ floors. Thats around here anyway. What I see happenning is something along the lines of maybe another RiverPlace type of developement. Maybe with a little more height. But it all depends on what they are paying for the property. If it's at or just above market value, then expect RiverPlace with a little more height. But if they were in a bidding war for it, and they must have spent alot, then expect something spectacular. I'm suspecting the first. You know both parties didn't say. But we'll see really soon.

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I agree, the site is too large to demand significant height. I would prefer it to be a really great collection of midrises.

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I agree, the site is too large to demand significant height. I would prefer it to be a really great collection of midrises.

I love high rises, but I agree that several mid rise buildings are more appropriate for that area. A 20+ story building across from the Peace Center would not look right at all. Edited by gman

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I agree that it might be out of place. But would love to see some modern height in downtown. The Landmark has height, but it's so 60ish. I wish they could redo it in more glass. Mid-rises could work, so long as it's a significant amount of them. DC is mostly mid-rises, but they don't feel like mid-rises when you are down there; because there are so many of them. Very dense. One of my favorite large cities.

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I agree that it might be out of place. But would love to see some modern height in downtown. The Landmark has height, but it's so 60ish. I wish they could redo it in more glass. Mid-rises could work, so long as it's a significant amount of them. DC is mostly mid-rises, but they don't feel like mid-rises when you are down there; because there are so many of them. Very dense. One of my favorite large cities.

I see Greenville with a mid-rise skyline. Which there is nothing wrong with that. With maybe a sprinkling of high-rises in the future. But Washington is a good, no excellent example of a large city with a mid-rise. Which is saying, you don't need high-rises to have that urban feel.

Being honest. I like how developements are happennig at the pace and locations that they are. Than to see them happenning in one place. That's what happened to Charlotte. Everything downtown, uptown to folks there, and bald around the edges. With all the focus on the high-rise towers, they lost focus. They had been dealing with this for a long time. Up until recently. Guess what Columbia is/has the same issue.

Reason I mentioned that is because high-rises don't make a city. It's how the buildings work and look together.

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I agree that I like the way Greenville's urban environment is developing and continuing to grow outward. For every project that adds continuous density, we see a significant project expanding the core and pushing the limits of what we often view as downtown's boundaries. I'm happy with the midrise construction we are seeing right now. Rivers Edge Is a great example.

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Does it feel like it is 2006 again? Remember all the projects anniounced and then the economy went south and most never got built. I think it is different now but there have been several announced projects that seemed to have become dormant. I noticed there is an available sign at the corner off Stone and Main. I thought that  was sold?

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Does it feel like it is 2006 again? Remember all the projects anniounced and then the economy went south and most never got built. I think it is different now but there have been several announced projects that seemed to have become dormant. I noticed there is an available sign at the corner off Stone and Main. I thought that  was sold?

That property has already closed.  The Beach Company, who bought it, is also buying the property at Stone and Rowley.   Construction can't start until the city's sewer upgrades are complete.  There has been commentary in the forums about a possible revamp of the project, now that they have added the additional property.

 

What incentive does a Realtor have to take down their sign until the last possible minute?

 

Trammel Crow is NOT going to buy property in a new market and then sit on it. That would sully there reputation. There are as big as it gets in this business. 

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Does it feel like it is 2006 again? Remember all the projects anniounced and then the economy went south and most never got built. I think it is different now but there have been several announced projects that seemed to have become dormant. I noticed there is an available sign at the corner off Stone and Main. I thought that was sold?

The ones that appear to be dormant aren't slated to start construction until late this year or early next year.

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The ones that appear to be dormant aren't slated to start construction until late this year or early next year.

Ya, tons of design work, choosing subs, financing and so much more to be done between approval and the start of construction.

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Does it feel like it is 2006 again? Remember all the projects anniounced and then the economy went south and most never got built. I think it is different now but there have been several announced projects that seemed to have become dormant. I noticed there is an available sign at the corner off Stone and Main. I thought that  was sold?

Calm down. This is not 2006. Plus, what does the Stone and Main site have to do with the G News site?

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Breaking: construction to start in early Summer 2015. Major national retailers very interested. Completion in 15-18 months.

Edited by gman430

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I see Greenville with a mid-rise skyline. Which there is nothing wrong with that. With maybe a sprinkling of high-rises in the future. But Washington is a good, no excellent example of a large city with a mid-rise. Which is saying, you don't need high-rises to have that urban feel.

Being honest. I like how developements are happennig at the pace and locations that they are. Than to see them happenning in one place. That's what happened to Charlotte. Everything downtown, uptown to folks there, and bald around the edges. With all the focus on the high-rise towers, they lost focus. They had been dealing with this for a long time. Up until recently. Guess what Columbia is/has the same issue.

Reason I mentioned that is because high-rises don't make a city. It's how the buildings work and look together.

 

Ummm, that's not accurate at all. Within Uptown, you have developments like Gateway Village and several residential developments close to the outer edge of Uptown, and right outside Uptown, you have an unbelievable amount of (mostly lowrise and midrise) development in South End along the light rail line, Met Midtown, NC Music Factory, etc. Charlotte has had an issue with getting retail Uptown and of course we know that it erased too much of its historic urban fabric, but it's done a great job in terms of creating synergy in the core with both highrises and midrises and having it radiate out from there. Also, the city's core industries (mainly banking and supporting industries) lend themselves to highrises; although Greenville's core industries are more manufacturing related (which typically doesn't spawn lots of highrises), there could have been a few more downtown had companies like Michelin and Carolina First decided to build towers downtown instead of suburban corporate campuses fronting the interstate.

 

That said, Greenville is doing an awesome job in terms of development, but it's a bit different from the Charlotte model due to a couple of factors.

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The more national retailers, the better.  Downtown Greenville has plenty of space for both local and national retailers, particularly with the acres and acres and acres of vacant land and parking lots that could be developed into additional retail space.  The more of both types of retailers downtown, the larger the critical mass of stores would be, which would help attract even more customers.  As much as I like shopping at Brooks Brothers, for everyday items, downtown just doesn't offer enough stores to be an equal competitor with suburbia.

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Be careful what you wish for. A major retailer could severely disrupt business for the local boutiques peppered downtown.

I seriously doubt that. As a soon to be downtown resident myself I support more national retailers and restaurants coming downtown. I just don't see how a Target or even a Trader Joe's would hurt a women's boutique. Anthropologie, Publix, Staples, CVS, Brooks Brothers, etc. sure hasn't from what I have seen so why would something Like Target and Trader Joe's? They're not even the same type of store.

Edited by gman430

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I seriously doubt that. As a soon to be downtown resident myself I support more national retailers and restaurants coming downtown. I just don't see how a Target or even a Trader Joe's would hurt a women's boutique. Anthropologie, Publix, Staples, CVS, Brooks Brothers, etc. sure hasn't from what I have seen so why would something Like Target and Trader Joe's? They're not even the same type of store.

Agreed. A Target or Trader Joe's would also draw people downtown on a regular basis, since those are "everyday" stores. That would only help the existing boutiques, which are non-"everyday" stores. Publix, Mast General Store and maybe Staples and CVS are the only stores that people regularly need to go to, and those are good anchors but not enough.

Downtown seems to have the largest mass of upscale boutiques and gift shops in town; I spend most of my shopping time at places like Target or a department store, though.

The Greenville News site would be great for a Target and an Imax or something entertainment-oriented.

Edited by mallguy

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The more national retailers, the better.  Downtown Greenville has plenty of space for both local and national retailers, particularly with the acres and acres and acres of vacant land and parking lots that could be developed into additional retail space.  The more of both types of retailers downtown, the larger the critical mass of stores would be, which would help attract even more customers.  As much as I like shopping at Brooks Brothers, for everyday items, downtown just doesn't offer enough stores to be an equal competitor with suburbia.

 

But should downtown be an equal competitor with suburbia? I wouldn't want to see every suburban chain locate downtown, but I think a few that appeal to a broader population, appropriately scaled, can work. 

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But should downtown be an equal competitor with suburbia? I wouldn't want to see every suburban chain locate downtown, but I think a few that appeal to a broader population, appropriately scaled, can work.

I mean "equal" in terms of "equally appealing to people and retailers". Not "identical in every respect".

Downtown Greenville certainly isn't equal (in the sense of "identical") to Haywood Road; downtown is much nicer, has nicer stores on average and has a higher-class customer base, in my view (and probably demographic and rent surveys support this view).

However, what is key in retailing is critical mass; any retail area needs to have a critical mass of stores that is equal in size enough to compete with other retail areas. Downtown certainly has that for niche boutiques and restaurants, but it doesn't for stores that really draw crowds, such as Target or department stores. It needs more anchors to draw crowds, which would help the niche boutiques. It could certainly have upscale anchors rather than mid-market ones, which would probably blend well with its current stores.

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Ummm, that's not accurate at all. Within Uptown, you have developments like Gateway Village and several residential developments close to the outer edge of Uptown, and right outside Uptown, you have an unbelievable amount of (mostly lowrise and midrise) development in South End along the light rail line, Met Midtown, NC Music Factory, etc. Charlotte has had an issue with getting retail Uptown and of course we know that it erased too much of its historic urban fabric, but it's done a great job in terms of creating synergy in the core with both highrises and midrises and having it radiate out from there. Also, the city's core industries (mainly banking and supporting industries) lend themselves to highrises; although Greenville's core industries are more manufacturing related (which typically doesn't spawn lots of highrises), there could have been a few more downtown had companies like Michelin and Carolina First decided to build towers downtown instead of suburban corporate campuses fronting the interstate.

That said, Greenville is doing an awesome job in terms of development, but it's a bit different from the Charlotte model due to a couple of factors.

Well i do know what you were talking about. I really meant how things were in the early 80's to about the early 2000's. I lived there as a youth in the 80's when alot of the older buildings were torn down. That was shame. But they did get better at attract developing areas like gateway and southend. There was no dissing, just honest observation.

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