Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Paramount747

Thoughts on High Rise Development In The Future

13 posts in this topic

While it appears that the CBD is indeed "full",  I have noticed many small lots that could support very tall sliver buildings. I think we will see many buildings rehabilitated, and the possibility of floors added to existing buildings. This has become a common practice in many parts of the world as a means to employ adaptive reuse of older structures.

 

Ron and I were talking last week about how our population increased will necessitate the need for taller, dense structures in downtown with close proximity to public transportation, traditional interstates, and bus systems.

 

There is a trend if you will of this happening all over the country. The Wall Street Journal recently had an article about small towns getting smaller and smaller as young people migrate back to the cities for work.

 

Places like Cool Springs, and Maryland Farms will continue to build their own metropolises with 5-10 story buildings until they run out of room, but they are fast becoming their own self contained cities.

 

So dense cities may not necessarily be skyscraper cities, but they could be like Cool Springs, Maryland Farms, and with some extent Green Hills. These are basically self contained cities that have everything a resident wants without ever having to leave.

 

So will the city center see the most growth, or will it be the "suburban cities" we are seeing now?

 

Only time will tell, but it is my estimation that Nashville will see a skyscraper boom of residential towers in the 30-70 story range in the next 10 years. I predict no less that 10 towers of 30-70 stories in the next ten years. We will still have office buildings, and many employers are moving downtown, but the suburban satellite cities will thrive as well.

 

The rural areas with small populations will continue to decline, and some suburban areas that did not have smart planning  will continue to suffer until smart planning takes place to offer services and amenities that people want. Many areas will lose people every year because jobs are few, and there is very limited medical care, and entertainment not to mention outdated infrastructure and lack of public transportation.

 

 

Discuss.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


We just spent the weekend in Atlanta. I was amazed at the number of "micro-cities" they had featuring clusters of large office towers (Buckhead especially). I could see Green Hiils, Cool Springs and other areas growing "up" as their own CBDs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

John:  we're going to hold you to your claim that Nashville will get a skyscraper boom.  We will save this post and read it to you on the days when you state with equal assurance that Nashville will never have even another 30 story building.

Brett, I thought about that when I was writing it! However, from some things I have read recently, my mind may be changed. Now to clarify, I think the tall buildings will be residential. I still say hotels will be in the 10-20 story range, and offices 20-35 story range. I don't know how many major office tenants we will attract  to use a large block of space, but I can definitely see the residential. Offices are still flooding to the suburbs, but I bet we could see some 10-20 towers in Cool Springs, Green Hills, and Maryland Farms.

 

One reason I have been so impatient with The Sobro is the fact that I think The Sobro will be the catalyst. 1212 Laurel is still out of the CBD and will be attractive to people who frequent The Gulch, and West End.  The Sobro  will attract the person who still wants to be in the heart of the downtown action.

 

To Miami's point, I think the "micro-city" is well on its way to being the norm.

Edited by Urban Architecture

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cool springs has a limit on height to about 10-12 stories.

 

Green Hills has a limit of "We don't want Green Hills to change from what it was in the 1970's"

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Green Hills has a limit of "We don't want Green Hills to change from what it was in the 1970's"

 

 

*unless it involves high end shopping.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


*unless it involves high end shopping.

 

The "neatest" mall I have ever visited was about 15 stories tall and had "express" escalators. This would be a wonderful concept for the base of the old convention center project

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The "neatest" mall I have ever visited was about 15 stories tall and had "express" escalators. This would be a wonderful concept for the base of the old convention center project

Express clothing stores in the elevators??? that is pretty neat   :D

 

So where would everyone rather see a mini-city form? Sobro area or the Gulch? Or even further west at West End?

Edited by bigeasy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Gulch for me. Sobro will continue to grow, but I view it more as an extension of the CBD rather than a new "mini city" given the proximity of the two.

One will develop around WestEnd too, but it will be less concentrated ham either the Gulch or Sobro. The Buckingham project is going to join the Adelicia with extending the West End "skyline" away from West End and give the neighborhood a little more depth as opposed to being linear. There will very likely be some other high rise developments in that same area before too long.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Look to Austin to see what can  happen... even what should happen in Nashville.  Austin has some impressive residential towers, but they've required some gutsy developers, which haven't yet staked their claim in Nashville.  We'll see.  Tony Giarratana talks a big game, but in the end, he has relatively modest results to show for his bluster (yes, I've heard all of you who say he is a great guy, and I have no doubts about that).  The thing is, Nashville has been overlooked by the national developers until now. My point is don't look to any of the local yokels for the tall ones.  Just like the Buckingham and the 1515 Demonbreun tower (a couple of modest examples), but their developers have connections to big money banks. Lennar has made a push, and they are in the urban segment, but they have not yet made any suggestion that they are into the hi rise segment.  As far as office, all you need to do is look at all the movement to Williamson, and the 8% vacancy in office in the CBD!! But the local folks are quite content to send them to Williamson.  Emery is the exception, but his current building really is "no great shakes" (as the saying goes).  It really is a shame, but I expect that office will lag... and see lots of its potential being sponged by Williamson.  That's my corner of the envelope (napkin) analysis. 

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Express clothing stores in the elevators??? that is pretty neat   :D

 

Hmmmm....they are called Xpresscalators. This mall has two sets that connect floors 4-8 and 8-12.

 

**Some of these pics are mine, some are borrowed from public domain

 

Xpresscalator connecting floors 4-8

aphoto95053_zps4b3d5bd4.jpg

 

7974750317_1195141838_h_zpsdac1c518.jpg

 

Xpresscalator connecting floors 8-12  ***The mall spirals around this set

LanghamPlace-TheSpiral_zps0dbe6ca1.jpg

 

TheSpiralatLanghamPlaceshoppingmallinMon

 

P1020430_zps6f56ac74.jpg

 

IMAG1488_zpsa8204e3c.jpg

 

And a very cool set of lighted stairs! Yes, the colors and patterns are constantly changing

IMAG1482_zps8c43a417.jpg

 

 

I think it would be wonderful to create a downtown shopping venue like this here. That's why I mentioned the old convention center as a possible candidate. However, another possible location would be near the proposed Sheet Music (or M Hayes also) or the new KVB roundabout

 

Aloha!

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.