Jump to content

TAXI,UBER,TRANSPORTATION DEBATE


producer2

Recommended Posts

If the service isn't going to change because these companies already self regulate enough then why do we need the regulation again? Can we compare the quality of the regulated vs the unregulated and see which is better?

 

Should we not regulate taxi service at all, then? Because all taxi service should be under the same rulebook (if there is to be one). You can't hold yellow cabs and limos to one standard and services like Uber or Lyft to no standard at all. Self-regulation is great...but ultimately, who do they answer to?

 

The playing field should be equal, and let the free market decide which service they wish to use.

 

I think whether or not this is "reasonable" will be directly correlated with what exactly that fee is going to be.

 

I agree that the fee should not be prohibitive to promote business...but it probably wouldn't hurt for it to be high enough to discourage the more casually interested people to this profession. Otherwise the market could be over-saturated with drivers and dilute potential earnings.

Link to comment
Share on other sites


  • Replies 70
  • Created
  • Last Reply

But only after we look back and see why those regulations were put in place (public safety, etc.) and ask if they are still needed. They may not be, but if they are, then, as you suggest, we need to apply them to Uber and Lyft also.

I definitely think exploring the regulations is a great idea. Some may indeed be unnecessary. I think in the interest of public safety, background checks and licensing are a must. I would also add that charges and the methods in which they are applied should be clear to the consumer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites


The regulations have created terrible quality for consumers by creating a barrier to entry. That makes sense right? So making everyone undergo the same regulations won't make things better.

I'd like a sufficient barrier to entry to keep serial killers and people with reckless driving convictions out, at least.  Obviously the cab companies have worked the system because the public has allowed it; the answer isn't deregulation but appropriate regulation.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Uber/Lyft are inherently safer because of the native record keeping.  Cabs, not so much.  A cabbie got away with murder because of it.

 

Look, it's great that they keep their own records. It's great that they have good customer satisfaction. I'm not in this discussion to defend cabbies. I hate cabbies.

 

However, the fact remains that you can't have two sets of rules for each of these services. Regulating one and not the other gives one a huge competitive advantage.

 

 

 

But think about this: companies change hands all the time. What is to say that one or both of these companies gets bought, and the new owners aren't as keen on record keeping? Who exactly is holding them accountable?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nashville airport first in U.S. to allow Uber, Lyft

 

http://www.tennessean.com/story/money/2014/09/25/nashville-airport-bna-uber-lyft-ride-sharing/16209319/

 

So I guess the airport authority approved them, but the city still has regulations to approve? Wouldn't the City Transportation board have to make them legal, before the airport does...since they have to drive on city streets.

 

Just wondering

 

Originally Posted in Bits and Pieces -can delete that one

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Uber drivers were told to stay off airport property unless they were actively dropping off/picking up. They were not allowed to 'idle' and wait for fares. Maybe since it is (?) private property?

I think they want to keep them out of the bus/taxi lanes. I suppose they could wait in the cell phone waiting area.

Even for us regular folks, you can only 'park' by the terminal for 10 minutes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think they want to keep them out of the bus/taxi lanes. I suppose they could wait in the cell phone waiting area.

Even for us regular folks, you can only 'park' by the terminal for 10 minutes.

We took Uber from airport last time and the guy showed up in under two minutes so he had to be sitting in cell phone waiting or be circling.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But with Uber's call model vs the taxi queue model, I would think it'd be tough to police (and tax) Uber drivers if they are roaming generally in the area 2 to 5 minutes from the airport. As a practical matter, the pickup process with Uber is no different than a passenger getting picked up by a friend (and Uber is probably more reliable than most friends!). How does BNA distinguish an Uber driver picking up a passenger from friends or family picking up. Lyft, yeah ok, the pink mustache kind of gives them away.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But with Uber's call model vs the taxi queue model, I would think it'd be tough to police (and tax) Uber drivers if they are roaming generally in the area 2 to 5 minutes from the airport. As a practical matter, the pickup process with Uber is no different than a passenger getting picked up by a friend (and Uber is probably more reliable than most friends!). How does BNA distinguish an Uber driver picking up a passenger from friends or family picking up. Lyft, yeah ok, the pink mustache kind of gives them away.

I think that's the idea. Since customers aren't 'hailing' the Uber/Lyft drivers, then they should act in the same manner as friends/family rather than taxis. 

 

To clarify my earlier comment, I think what they don't want is for Uber/Lyft drivers to park in the bus or taxi lanes (or the 10 minute loading parking) waiting for a fare that has not been arranged. If a number of drivers started doing that, then it could really clog things up. Even though they may not officially allow it, I imagine they would let them wait in the cell phone parking area -- at least for the time being. If that lot starts filling up, they may crack down on it. And if they do, I don't think it would be terribly inconvenient for them to park in shopping center lots across I-40 on Donelson.

 

In any case, it's great news that they are allowing it at the airport to begin with. As long as it is done properly, it should be a great service for travelers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.