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mr. chips

Game Changer!

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Now here is a real Game Changer:

 

http://www.thestate.com/2014/06/06/3490221/smith-if-you-build-it-big-enough.html?sp=/99/168/

 

Smith: If you build it, big enough, they will come to Columbia

 

Absolutely amazing. I wish we did have visionaries all around Columbia but knowing that most people more so the older crowd wants everything to stay the same and no growth.

Edited by krazeeboi

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He writes that there are many things to do in Columbia that are poorly publicized.  He's right on that.  But then he goes on to list useless proposals as far as bringing in more visitors or offering more to do.  I find it to be a weak editorial.  Whoever can't find something to do for more than two days on business trips to Columbia is a boring person.

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Whoever can't find something to do for more than two days on business trips to Columbia is a boring person.

 

I wouldn't necessarily say that. For one, if a visitor doesn't have a car, that restricts what they can experience since Columbia isn't a dense city where one can walk extensively and run into things to do like Charleston or Savannah. Even larger cities that lack dense cores like Charlotte and Atlanta experience this same issue to an extent.

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I wouldn't necessarily say that. For one, if a visitor doesn't have a car, that restricts what they can experience since Columbia isn't a dense city where one can walk extensively and run into things to do like Charleston or Savannah. Even larger cities that lack dense cores like Charlotte and Atlanta experience this same issue to an extent.

I agree - when we think of a city the immediate image you have is of the downtown. You can test yourself with a speed association test: think of any city you have been to. What is the first picture in your mind? For example, NY - you probably see tall buildings in Manhattan. Or Charleston - you probably see the Battery or King Street, etc. In other words, what makes a city memorable is the downtown. Which is one of the frustrating things about the Columbia area: people in Lexington or Richland Northeast don't get the point that by strengthening our downtown we are strengthening the whole community. In other words - the more we can do to beautify the center city by making it walkable, having beautiful parks, creating great attractions, encouraging wonderful restaurants and stores - the more people will think of Columbia as a special place.  When I moved here some years ago, I was told that people in Cayce wouldn't cross the river to do anything in downtown Columbia. That attitude needs to change, with more concentrated activities, events, and places to visit in the downtown area. And people in the surrounding communities need to support spending dollars to make that happen. If only Richland and Lexington counties were one geographical and governmental region that would make it easier - of course that will never happen. 

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One of the op-ed comments raised an interesting point: Dubai is swimming in debt and had to be bailed out by neighboring Abu Dhabi to the tune of several billion dollars. Columbia does not have a huge tax base since much of the population lives outside of city limits. This, along with the very expensive federally mandated sewer repairs, inhibits its ability to take on some of the projects that have made other cities so successful. In my mind, every investment the city makes should be geared toward growing the tax base.

 

Will the baseball stadium increase the population? Will the city see another $200M in property and sales taxes as a result of it? Maybe. We'll have to wait and see. Would an indoor ski facility encourage people to move downtown? Probably not. It's hard to say what the right projects are because everyone has different factors that motivate them. The penny sales tax project should help clear up a lot of the basic infrastructure work that has traditionally been paid for by general fund revenues. Columbia Commons will likely consume much of the spending capacity the city has, so let's hope it works.

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One of the op-ed comments raised an interesting point: Dubai is swimming in debt and had to be bailed out by neighboring Abu Dhabi to the tune of several billion dollars. Columbia does not have a huge tax base since much of the population lives outside of city limits. This, along with the very expensive federally mandated sewer repairs, inhibits its ability to take on some of the projects that have made other cities so successful. In my mind, every investment the city makes should be geared toward growing the tax base.

 

Will the baseball stadium increase the population? Will the city see another $200M in property and sales taxes as a result of it? Maybe. We'll have to wait and see. Would an indoor ski facility encourage people to move downtown? Probably not. It's hard to say what the right projects are because everyone has different factors that motivate them. The penny sales tax project should help clear up a lot of the basic infrastructure work that has traditionally been paid for by general fund revenues. Columbia Commons will likely consume much of the spending capacity the city has, so let's hope it works.

A baseball stadium isn't going to increase population; however, a new urban downtown neighborhood with housing and an entertainment complex that serves as a minor-league baseball stadium among other things should do the trick.

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A baseball stadium isn't going to increase population; however, a new urban downtown neighborhood with housing and an entertainment complex that serves as a minor-league baseball stadium among other things should do the trick.

 

Sorry for the duplicate posts guys. Computer malfunction. I agree, assuming that the baseball stadium is the difference between people renting/buying in Columbia Commons versus moving somewhere outside of city limits. My point is that the city does not seem to have much additional borrowing capacity. The penny sales tax should improve the underlying infrastructure of the city and open additional land for redevelopment, but it has been controversial to say the least. City Council seems unwilling to raise sewer fees and continues to transfer money into the General Fund, in spite of the $75M/year it is required to spend on system repairs. It seems unlikely that Columbia could politically raise its property taxes at this point. Mayor Benjamin has either implied or explicitly stated that he expects the city tax rolls to grow enough that he would not have to cut funding to organizations supported by the tourism tax. Even if this is true, it seems unlikely that this revenue stream will increase so much that the city could credibly borrow against it for another major project. Columbia Commons is a big bet any way you slice it. 

 

Plenty of people already visit downtown for work, school, or just in passing. While not all of these people will move to Columbia, their impressions about the city help define the city's reputation as they discuss it with friends, family, colleagues, etc. Think about the amount of hype Greenville has generated even though it's not a huge tourist draw nationally. The Vista and to a degree Five Points improve the overall experience of staying downtown. I think the Main Street facade improvement program has had a huge impact since so many people stay in one of the hotels lining the street. I lived in Uptown Charlotte for a while and found that the amount of hype it received did not necessarily translate to the experience of living there. Still, I love it because there was a certain cool factor. Improving the narrative could help retain people who otherwise might not consider living in the city to be particularly remarkable.

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One of the op-ed comments raised an interesting point: Dubai is swimming in debt and had to be bailed out by neighboring Abu Dhabi to the tune of several billion dollars. Columbia does not have a huge tax base since much of the population lives outside of city limits. This, along with the very expensive federally mandated sewer repairs, inhibits its ability to take on some of the projects that have made other cities so successful. In my mind, every investment the city makes should be geared toward growing the tax base.

 

Will the baseball stadium increase the population? Will the city see another $200M in property and sales taxes as a result of it? Maybe. We'll have to wait and see. Would an indoor ski facility encourage people to move downtown? Probably not. It's hard to say what the right projects are because everyone has different factors that motivate them. The penny sales tax project should help clear up a lot of the basic infrastructure work that has traditionally been paid for by general fund revenues. Columbia Commons will likely consume much of the spending capacity the city has, so let's hope it works.

The stadium itself is not going to increase population but will increased the foot traffic in the area and companies and housing companies will want to build and construct around it and then people will want to move in.

 

I'm glad you mention Dubai about what they do. When you mention the Indoor Ski thing. In all honestly something like that Would attract people all over the country to come to knowing they have a Year round ski resort. So just like the Baseball stadium. Build it and they will come. especially with enough advertisement. Columbia Commons with enough advertising could draw people away from places like Atlanta Myrtle Beach Greenville even Charlotte to come work stay and play here in the Capital city.

I also think that The whole columbia Common's plan will work with a Complex mall kinda like Epicentre in Charlotte or like Metropolitan in Charlotte. something like that will keep people around and moving in and out day and night always bringing money in. 

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Came across this picture somewhere out there. This shows me that when it comes to connecting the University with "Innovista" (which is the most obnoxious name for an area ever) the City, University, or whoever, could go a long way just by giving Main Street South of the State House the Main-Street-North-of-the-State-House treatment. Wouldn't even have to be that far, maybe just from Pendleton to Blossom (though if I had complete power and limitless resources I would go past California Dreaming). I've seen a lot of people float the idea of a pedestrian street, and this would accomplish those goals without making traffic and parking in that area a complete sideshow. It would make parking better if they cut it down to one lane: that side of Main may have needed to be two lanes at one point but that point has long since expired. This goes to (a) a "game-changer" that would do more to connect two already-established areas (rather than creating one out of thin air, cough cough), (b) a public infrastructure change that should positively affect private development, and © simultaneously increases the supply of, and mitigates the negative affects for surface parking. 

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_1ZGfzmoBuQU/SoltjKp_-NI/AAAAAAAADYk/P9GC7VbO_Fg/s1600-h/USC+Innovista+looking+W+copy.jpg

Edited by Spes
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Came across this picture somewhere out there. This shows me that when it comes to connecting the University with "Innovista" (which is the most obnoxious name for an area ever) the City, University, or whoever, could go a long way just by giving Main Street South of the State House the Main-Street-North-of-the-State-House treatment. Wouldn't even have to be that far, maybe just from Pendleton to Blossom (though if I had complete power and limitless resources I would go past California Dreaming). I've seen a lot of people float the idea of a pedestrian street, and this would accomplish those goals without making traffic and parking in that area a complete sideshow. It would make parking better if they cut it down to one lane: that side of Main may have needed to be two lanes at one point but that point has long since expired. This goes to (a) a "game-changer" that would do more to connect two already-established areas (rather than creating one out of thin air, cough cough), (b) a public infrastructure change that should positively affect private development, and © simultaneously increases the supply of, and mitigates the negative affects for surface parking. 

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_1ZGfzmoBuQU/SoltjKp_-NI/AAAAAAAADYk/P9GC7VbO_Fg/s1600-h/USC+Innovista+looking+W+copy.jpg

I agree completely - now let's get the "powers that be" to act on it! 

Edited by mr. chips

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Came across this picture somewhere out there. This shows me that when it comes to connecting the University with "Innovista" (which is the most obnoxious name for an area ever) the City, University, or whoever, could go a long way just by giving Main Street South of the State House the Main-Street-North-of-the-State-House treatment. Wouldn't even have to be that far, maybe just from Pendleton to Blossom (though if I had complete power and limitless resources I would go past California Dreaming). I've seen a lot of people float the idea of a pedestrian street, and this would accomplish those goals without making traffic and parking in that area a complete sideshow. It would make parking better if they cut it down to one lane: that side of Main may have needed to be two lanes at one point but that point has long since expired. This goes to (a) a "game-changer" that would do more to connect two already-established areas (rather than creating one out of thin air, cough cough), (b) a public infrastructure change that should positively affect private development, and © simultaneously increases the supply of, and mitigates the negative affects for surface parking. 

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_1ZGfzmoBuQU/SoltjKp_-NI/AAAAAAAADYk/P9GC7VbO_Fg/s1600-h/USC+Innovista+looking+W+copy.jpg

I like your energy.  You should email "the powers that be."  You'll be preaching to the choir for the most part.  I've learned this from the responses to my constant emailing.  These things take money, however.  The latest I've heard out of City Hall and planners is that continuing the Main Street streetscaping from Blanding to Columbia College is heavy on their minds.  A timely email, from someone besides me, on your idea for Main Street - south of the capitol to Whaley Street - might prompt them to go for enough money to do that part, too.  

 

Columbia, Richland County and Lexington County just signed off, with USC's blessing, on an agreement to submit to the state's transportation infrastructure council or committee or whatever, for funding to extend Greene Street to the River.  Since the photo you linked to was taken, DMSOB has filled in a corner parcel, and the foundation is literally already laid for the 800-bed private USC dorms just a block from Greene.  With all the development going on in the area, improved street infrastructure is bound to follow.  

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From my inbox:

 

Thanks for registering to attend the Plan Columbia Workshop. 

The city wants to make sure that participation in the workshop is a choice for anyone who cares about Columbia's future. You can help us spread the word. 

Invite your friends, family, and co-workers and encourage them to attend. 

You should know that... 

For the first time in nearly 50 years, the City of Columbia will rewrite the rules for development—zoning and land development ordinances. Adding to the unique timing is the fact that Richland County is also preparing an update to their land use plan and priority investment areas.

If you care about Columbia’s future...connecting neighborhoods, providing places for jobs, ensuring housing choice, preserving special places, building vibrant commercial districts, protecting greenways, addressing vacant lots, reusing empty buildings, and creating a place future generations will love, then you should get involved.

The Workshop involves two public sessions (at 6pm on June 24, and 6pm on June 26), each with a distinct format and agenda. The second session will build upon the work from the first, so attend both sessions to fully participate. If you can’t attend both sessions, you may attend whichever one is most convenient. You may also stop by during drop-in hours on June 25 to talk one-on-one with the planning team and see the work in progress. 

We'll see you next week!

 

for more information visit www.weplantogether.org

 

 

Plan Columbia Workshop icon_datetime_no-trans_bw.gif Tuesday, June 24, 2014 at 6:00 PM - Thursday, June 26, 2014 at 8:00 PM (EDT) icon_location_no-trans_bw.gif Columbia Metropolitan Convention Center, 1101 Lincoln St, Columbia, SC 29201  {sodEmoji.|}  Directions
 

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I don't know where to post this but i got another crazy brainstorming idea.

 

What if Columbia could look into getting a Ferris Wheel in Downtown like near the river or something. a big tall one that Will look over the whole downtown and river. it would be a great tourist attraction and great addition to the future Innovista project

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On 9/11/2016 at 1:13 AM, waccamatt said:

I think a small amusement park in the Vista would be a great addition. It would need more than a ferris wheel, though, imo.

That would be cool

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