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Rock2uf

Best historic district in Florida?

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I apologize in advance if this topic has already been covered. I searched and didn't see where this thread had been done.

Please list St. Augustine only if you truly think it is the best. I personally like St. Auggie's history, but I have to believe there are better historic districts in the state when considering charm, walkablility, etc.

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Although I have not visited any of them, I am going to go out on a limb and say that Jax probably contains the best historic district in FL.

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Not so fast there buddy!! Your state capital contains history to die for... check us out this historic Chain of Parks neighborhood designated on the National Register of Historic Places...

Front.jpg

Historic Federal District Court

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y178/TaureanJ/misc_pic.gif

Knott House Museum where Emancipation Proclaimation was read to slaves in Tallahassee.

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The Lively Mansion

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1679216-Presbyterian_Church_in_downtown_Tallahassee-Tallahassee.jpg

Oldest Public Building in the Florida Capital.

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The Monroe House

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The Brokaw McDougall House

these are just some of the few historic sites you can find along the Park Avenue Chain. Truly a historic treasure.

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Also notable are these historical buildings in Tallahassee

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The Southwood® Mansion

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Adams Street Commons

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Historic Gaillie Hall

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Tallahassee's First Skyscraper

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Keep the pics coming and I might be forced to check that part of Tally out myself. That's excellent stuff.

Well, since you had to throw Tally pics on this forum, below is a link to pictures of structures in Gainesville's five historic districts. The pics are small and of poor quality, many structures do not even have pics posted, and all-n-all the site could be better. But, this will give you an idea of the types of historic structures in Gainesville. And many (tens or hundreds) are not included on the site. This is why I have been preaching that Gainesville will one day have very solid historic districts. But we are clearly not there yet and I am in no way claiming that Gainesville has the best historic district in FL. Not yet, anyway. Oh yeah, the link:

http://growth-management.alachua.fl.us/his...e/gvhistory.htm

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When you say historic district, what do you mean? Something that is touristy, with historic markers and such, or something that has actual history.

Saint augustine has a historic district but it is so touristy. I really do not need to see the Nations oldest t shirt shop. Jacksonville has history all around town with a few large areas of unique history - springfield, la villa before the bomb went off, Mayport (the town not the base), Downtown. But there isn't really anything connecting them all together, that I would consider walkable.

What about Ybor City? or Duval Street in Key West? Those are pretty historic.

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Jacksonville's best historic district and the Florida's largest is the Riverside-Avondale Historic District. Its got architecture, numerous urban parks, a gridded street system, miles of riverfront, several pedestrian friendly commercial corridors, musuems and it takes up a large area. However, I will say, as far as overall vibrancy, Miami Beach's Art Deco District is the best.

Riverside/Avondale Historic District

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I think it would be hard to deny that St. Augustine is the most impressive historic district. I have to go with it. After that, honorable mentions would be Fernandina Beach, Sobe, Fort Myers, Mount Dora, Ybor City...

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Riverside/Avondale in Jacksonville is one of the largest historic districts in the SE US. As far as FL goes, there are certainly older areas and more historic areas, but, having travelled all over the state, I think this is the best residential, non-touristy area. Miami Beach has a more modern, art deco look and Key West and St Augustine are great but too touristy. I think that the answer to this question really depends on your personal architectural preferences and whether or not you are talking about more of a residential district.

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I'd say that Amelia Island has a very lengthy history in that it has been occupied by 8 different nations or entities.

Riverside/Avondale is simply huge.

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I think it would be hard to deny that St. Augustine is the most impressive historic district.  I have to go with it.  After that, honorable mentions would be Fernandina Beach, Sobe, Fort Myers, Mount Dora, Ybor City...

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As a whole, Ybor is pretty depressing. Most of the community, outside of 7th Avenue was demolished in a failed urban renewal project. Tampa's best historic district is Hyde Park.

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The South Beach deco district is my favorite, followed by Key West and St. Augustine.

Appalachicola I hear is very nice. I agree about Ybor city but it's still a nice place for a walk and some lunch.

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Ybor isnt that bad and yea that area of Tampa is pretty good historically

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I'll just say the areas of Ybor, outside of 7th Avenue (ex. north of I-4 or east of 22nd St.) leave a lot to be desired, after years of highway expansion, urban renewal and neglect.

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As a whole, Ybor is pretty depressing.  Most of the community, outside of 7th Avenue was demolished in a failed urban renewal project.  Tampa's best historic district is Hyde Park.

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The area to the north of I-4 is certainly nothing to write home about, but central area of Ybor(south of I-4 to Adamo) has come a long way in the past 15 years and I wouldn't describe it as "depressing." There are newly renovated historic buildings all around that area and I feel those developing that area have kept the Spanish/Cuban theme intact with the new buildings that have been built or are proposed. Take a drive around there in the daytime and you'll see what I mean.

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The area to the north of I-4 is certainly nothing to write home about, but central area of Ybor(south of I-4 to Adamo) has come a long way in the past 15 years and I wouldn't describe it as "depressing." There are newly renovated historic buildings all around that area and I feel those developing that area have kept the Spanish/Cuban theme intact with the new buildings that have been built or are proposed. Take a drive around there in the daytime and you'll see what I mean.

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I agree, there is a lot going on in Ybor right now. If the North side of Ybor were gentrified (dare I say that word) then I'd probably say it would be the best hood in the state. Hyde Park is beautiful, I put it along the same lines as Riverside/Avondale, as wel as Winter Park/College Park in Orlando. All are very beautiful and have historic districts, yet are primarily inner city suburbs. Coral Gables is also one of these, though probably the most urban.

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I think the grand historic homes in Jacksonville in Riverside and particularly Avondale are nicer than those in Tampa and Orlando. The reason for this is Jacksonville was bigger/wealthier in the early 20th century than other cities in FL when all those great houses were built. So, we are lucky in this regard. Hyde Park in Tampa is great, but it seems to me it is predominantly bungalows. Orlando is not in the same league as Tampa and Jax in this respect (having large historic districts) b/c it was a small town back then.

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Not to detract from this Ybor argument (I've never been there, so I have no opinion), but I wanted to add some more about Jacksonville's Riverside district.

Riverside is no South Beach, that's for sure. However, it is the largest historic district in Florida, and it maintains a true neighborhood dynamic ... no tourists, just real people living in beautiful buildings.

Here are some quick google shots ...

Look how massive Riverside is (outlined in red)! That blue outline is Jax's other large historic district, Springfield.

JaxGoogle-historicdistricts.jpg

Here's a close-up shot, to convey the character of the neighborhood. (Also notice the Navy fighter jet caught in the shot)

JaxGoogle-riversidecloseup.jpg

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I think the grand historic homes in Jacksonville in Riverside and particularly Avondale are nicer than those in Tampa and Orlando.  The reason for this is Jacksonville was bigger/wealthier in the early 20th century than other cities in FL when all those great houses were built.  So, we are lucky with in this regard.  Hyde Park in Tampa is great, but it seems to me it is predominantly bungalows.  Orlando is not in the same league as Tampa and Jax in this respect (having large historic districts) b/c it was a small town back then.

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To be honest I don't know if this is true. Thornton Park, Delaney Park, Colonialtown and College Park, all of which make up one large area, is very representative of Florida vernacular architecture of the early 20th century. I agree that its more bungalows with larger homes mixed in (and of course the newer, larger home construction now) but to suggest it isn't as nice for this reason is just a personal preference, however I do remember you specifically saying that you have never been to Thornton Park. Also, Winter Park was layed out as a rich snowbird retreat in the late 1800s, so if rich is your thing, Winter Park is for you, or maybe Key West, Florida's richest town up to the early 1900s.

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