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Nashville Yards, 15 acres/4 million sq. ft./ $1 billion, Phase I: Hyatt Regency Hotel (25 stories, 591 rooms, 65,000 sq ft of meeting space)

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I’m sure CSX would entertain the idea for the right price. Of course, the right price may be cost prohibitive for Metro and surrounding counties.

In my mind they should be subject to imminent domain just like any of us would. I’m sure there is something limiting that legally, but I don’t think their property should be any more sacrosanct than my property. If certain property could be used to improve the lives of hundreds of thousands of people then an imminent domain claim could force them to the table. 

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2 hours ago, Hey_Hey said:

I’m sure CSX would entertain the idea for the right price. Of course, the right price may be cost prohibitive for Metro and surrounding counties.

In my mind they should be subject to imminent domain just like any of us would. I’m sure there is something limiting that legally, but I don’t think their property should be any more sacrosanct than my property. If certain property could be used to improve the lives of hundreds of thousands of people then an imminent domain claim could force them to the table. 

Their property is currently being used to improve the lives of hundreds of thousands. They bring the coal we use to keep our homes warm and our lights on. They could very well end service to Nashville if we tried to nationalize (for lack of a better term) their property, thus creating a catestrophic local energy crisis. It would be extreme, but so would reversing 100+ years of how governments deal with the rail companies. 

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19 minutes ago, Pdt2f said:

Their property is currently being used to improve the lives of hundreds of thousands. They bring the coal we use to keep our homes warm and our lights on. They could very well end service to Nashville if we tried to nationalize (for lack of a better term) their property, thus creating a catestrophic local energy crisis. It would be extreme, but so would reversing 100+ years of how governments deal with the rail companies. 

Let's just load the coal and other freight into a fleet of self-driving church vans. They can carry all of the coal together and then make individual stops at each one of our houses for drop-off. Problem solved; No need for rail. 

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34 minutes ago, Pdt2f said:

Their property is currently being used to improve the lives of hundreds of thousands. They bring the coal we use to keep our homes warm and our lights on. They could very well end service to Nashville if we tried to nationalize (for lack of a better term) their property, thus creating a catestrophic local energy crisis. It would be extreme, but so would reversing 100+ years of how governments deal with the rail companies. 

Which plants use coal in middle Tennessee? I don’t believe any are currently in use but I could be wrong.

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31 minutes ago, samsonh said:

Which plants use coal in middle Tennessee? I don’t believe any are currently in use but I could be wrong.

I don’t know, but I see massive amounts of coal being shipped through Nashville all the time, most recently this morning in Madison. 

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17 minutes ago, Pdt2f said:

I don’t know, but I see massive amounts of coal being shipped through Nashville all the time, most recently this morning in Madison. 

Gotcha, lots of coal is transported via barge. But coal is quickly becoming economically obsolete due to natural gas. Google coal plan retirements if you find it intriguing like I do,  it’s pretty interesting how quickly it’s all happening.

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1 hour ago, samsonh said:

Which plants use coal in middle Tennessee? I don’t believe any are currently in use but I could be wrong.

Gallatin is the big power producer for the area and ships in coal via barge. They still have rail lines to the plant just in case but haven't been used for that specific delivery in decades. 

There are two others in Middle TN as well, Cumberland southwest of Clarksville in Houston County and Johnsonville near Waverly on the TN River in Humphreys County.

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1 hour ago, NashRugger said:

Gallatin is the big power producer for the area and ships in coal via barge. They still have rail lines to the plant just in case but haven't been used for that specific delivery in decades. 

There are two others in Middle TN as well, Cumberland southwest of Clarksville in Houston County and Johnsonville near Waverly on the TN River in Humphreys County.

Forgot about gallatin, Johnsonville no longer uses coal. Edit: most of the TVA plants are aging and losing economic efficiency. You will continue to see them phased out, particularly because natural gas is so cheap.

Edited by samsonh

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1 hour ago, samsonh said:

Forgot about gallatin, Johnsonville no longer uses coal. Edit: most of the TVA plants are aging and losing economic efficiency. You will continue to see them phased out, particularly because natural gas is so cheap.

****Way off topic*****

Coal is on its last breath.  Natural gas terminally injured it and solar and wind are driving the nails in the coffin.   Interestingly, solar and wind couple with batteries may be in the early stages of killing gas plants as they have become the cheapest way to produce electricity. 

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Some smart poster explained that basically building the 30th floor may cost one price, but building the 31st floor comes at a different price because you start to need a separate bank of elevators and that expands the footprint of the building. Unless you have tenants that are willing to pay extra to be in such a tall building, it's just not economically feasible to have anything taller than 30ish.

It makes a lot of sense because good elevator service is of major importance. I worked in the Polk Tower for most of 20 years and I can attest to that.  

If....and it's a big if.....Amazon decides to locate in Nashville, Nashville Yards is one of the proposed locations. We would see some very tall buildings then, I would suppose.

My crude, unofficial rendering....

24937131317_bbafaf7487_z.jpg

You could probably add the West End Summit to this proposal now, although extending the trolley line would be problematical.

Excuse the '1100' typo, I was informed that 100 acres was only required for a suburban location, so this proposal could meet the Amazon requirements.

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21 hours ago, PHofKS said:

Some smart poster explained that basically building the 30th floor may cost one price, but building the 31st floor comes at a different price because you start to need a separate bank of elevators and that expands the footprint of the building. Unless you have tenants that are willing to pay extra to be in such a tall building, it's just not economically feasible to have anything taller than 30ish.

This is interesting to think about. Is the additional bank because of time it would take to move the elevator cars up and down without developing long waits on floors?

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16 minutes ago, Bos2Nash said:

This is interesting to think about. Is the additional bank because of time it would take to move the elevator cars up and down without developing long waits on floors?

My experience working in a 28ish story building is, yes the wait for an elevator can be long, but mainly the lunch/quitting time rush when people on lower floors push the up button so they won't have to wait for the upper floors to clear out before getting an empty elevator. The upper floors didn't care much for that either, seeing the doors open with lower floor people and would sometimes reach in and push all the buttons so the lowers would have to stop at every floor on the way down. It got real stupid.

Sounds like some dystopian, class warfare novel, only funny. They finally allowed staggered work hours and that calmed things down.

So, yes. More elevators is better.

:rofl:

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An unfortunate side effect of this mega-development: The Frist will be shutting down its Rome antiquities exhibit on loan from the British Museum a month and a half early due to ongoing vibration concerns from the blasting across the street.

https://www.tennessean.com/story/entertainment/2018/04/16/frist-nashville-rome-exhibit-british-museum-shut-down-early-downtown-construction/522488002/

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It says in the article that they’re offering free admission to see the Rome exhibit on Friday, before the removal takes place Saturday. I’m dragging the wife and kid there for sure. 

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