Paramount747

Nashville 2020

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I will be 57 in 2020 so I am in no hurry for it to get here, but I am wondering what your thoughts are to what the city will be like. Hell, I am just trying to live one day at a time! It is tempting to project into the future, but I wonder how much will really be built, or if we will have a correction before then.

 

Thoughts?

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It's just 5 years away, but I think Nashville will feel even more like a major city.  The housing market bubble will have burst in 2018, but things will be springing back.  We will have surpassed Memphis for the 2020 census.   All of the hotels necessary for the convention center will have been built so we will have large conventions more often.  The bar scene on Demonbreun will be a memory (with plans to turn that side into retail to accommodate the people that live across the street), but it will likely be re-incarnated somewhere else (SoBro or maybe Church street).  We will have terrible traffic all of the time in every part of the city, because  the local government isn't going to do anything to fix it.  There will be a lot more high rises in the skyline.  In addition to all of the confirmed projects there will likely be 4 or 5 additional highrises being built by 2020.  The Palmer lake will finally be gone but work will just have started on the new project.  The northern half of 840 will be under construction, and it will have Interstate status.  Lafayette street will look completely different, with all sorts of new development, only preserving that historic church.  Division will connect to Lafayette.  Deja Vu will be long gone and a high rise will be in its place.  The corner of 12th and Demunbreun will be all high rises.  Main street in East Nashville will look completely different and will become much more dense.  No more urban sprawl on Gallatin up to Eastland.  Eastland will be straightened so there won't be two annoying lights at that intersection anymore. Greer Stadium will have been transformed into a mixed use development, with office, retail and condos.  The Tennessee fair grounds will be a thing of the past, moved out to the country.  Replacing it is a new urban district with park space and new placement of streets.  Wedgewood will connect all the way to murfreesboro pike.  Etc etc.  

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I just hope that traffic issues are better. Heck five years doesn't seem like a long time when you think about. Just seemed like 2010 was yesterday. I honestly don't know how much could be done by then. Maybe some things will be in the works. I bet the skyline is going to look great from the CBD, SoBro, the Gulch, Midtown, and heck maybe WES will be done!! I'm sure tall buildings or not it's going to look great.

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It's just 5 years away, but I think Nashville will feel even more like a major city.  The housing market bubble will have burst in 2018, but things will be springing back.  We will have surpassed Memphis for the 2020 census.   All of the hotels necessary for the convention center will have been built so we will have large conventions more often.  The bar scene on Demonbreun will be a memory (with plans to turn that side into retail to accommodate the people that live across the street), but it will likely be re-incarnated somewhere else (SoBro or maybe Church street).  We will have terrible traffic all of the time in every part of the city, because  the local government isn't going to do anything to fix it.  There will be a lot more high rises in the skyline.  In addition to all of the confirmed projects there will likely be 4 or 5 additional highrises being built by 2020.  The Palmer lake will finally be gone but work will just have started on the new project.  The northern half of 840 will be under construction, and it will have Interstate status.  Lafayette street will look completely different, with all sorts of new development, only preserving that historic church.  Division will connect to Lafayette.  Deja Vu will be long gone and a high rise will be in its place.  The corner of 12th and Demunbreun will be all high rises.  Main street in East Nashville will look completely different and will become much more dense.  No more urban sprawl on Gallatin up to Eastland.  Eastland will be straightened so there won't be two annoying lights at that intersection anymore. Greer Stadium will have been transformed into a mixed use development, with office, retail and condos.  The Tennessee fair grounds will be a thing of the past, moved out to the country.  Replacing it is a new urban district with park space and new placement of streets.  Wedgewood will connect all the way to murfreesboro pike.  Etc etc.  

 

 

Thanks, oh mighty "Swami".  Darn, I sure will miss Deja Vu (ha-ha).  As far as 840 is concerned, it has been said that the northern half probably never will get built, at least in the foreseeable.  I do forsee a mounting need to provide a northerly bypass for that part of the region as a whole, not to "spawn" development, but to combine with transit needs long-term.

-==-

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Please name a hub and spoke city where a successful mass transit system has been implemented.

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The next five years will see massive growth of the SoBro and Sulphur Dell areas. Additionally the former Lifeway site will be in the throws of redevelopment transforming the western edge of the CBD. Wedgewood-Houston will become the next major development area once we connect 6th avenue over the tracks into the old Greer site. Donnelson finally gets its day and sees a complete rebirth.

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Please name a hub and spoke city where a successful mass transit system has been implemented.

Boston.

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Boston.

True. And that city grid is a total mess too.

Gives me hope.

Edited by NoChesterHester
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True. And that city grid is a total mess too.

Gives me hope.

 

That's because they never dismantled the rail portions altogether, although some parts of it had been abandoned during early mid= 20th c.  As we all know, the system continued to grow, with all the separate and various rail segments becoming under control of a single entity, to the extent that Boston's system (MBTA) has become the only such system having such a number of various types of rail transit.

 

Yes that city is a total mess, and that's one reason that several previously abandoned rail lines in the area have become restored as light-rail (1950s Riverside line, and Mattapan High-Speed line), and especially as commuter-rail, more recently, the SE (South Shore) line to Cohasset and Scituate, Ma.

-==-

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London

Every city is hub and spoke to a certain extent, but the heart of London is absolutely not a hub and spoke. It is definitely a grid that bends to the Thames.

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Every city is hub and spoke to a certain extent, but the heart of London is absolutely not a hub and spoke. It is definitely a grid that bends to the Thames.

More like a spiderweb that bends. London is a collection of hubs and spokes that grew into each other and gradually connected.

In any event, mass transit works in a city like London when it goes underground and is not constrained by historical railroad rights of way.

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More like a spiderweb that bends. London is a collection of hubs and spokes that grew into each other and gradually connected.

In any event, mass transit works in a city like London when it goes underground and is not constrained by historical railroad rights of way.

True not an option here. Just like the Boston example the system has been there for a long time and has benefitted from additions -- not wholesale system installation. I can see us being successful creating some spines in a mass transit system, but the cross town routes.... the ones necessary to make the system really be viable as an alternative to the car... Will be really difficult. Multiple transfers will be needed which lowers the usability.

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It IS an option here, it is everywhere, but the option is extremely expensive.

If it is the most expensive option for achieving the same result then it isn't an option. Someone doesn't drive a Porsche because it is the most efficient way of getting to work, it is a choice based on want. Any mass transit option is going to be a hard sell because we are allergic to tax in Tennessee. Our government investing in Porsche's is going to make it even harder.

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Please name a hub and spoke city where a successful mass transit system has been implemented.

Washington?

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It's become to overwhelming to follow at this point! Too many projects!

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It's become to overwhelming to follow at this point! Too many projects!

That's why I have a spread sheet and a project list in Microsoft Word too. I have a lot of them in my head, but good gosh it is getting hard.

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BY 2020 my wife and I could be retired and living elsewhere like Chattanooga, Portland, or some small dense city. If we keep up at the current pace, we may have to sell our place to avoid paying the increased property taxes.

 

Increased property taxes could seriously be an issue. I could see us going to a small city on the East or West coast. 

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BY 2020 my wife and I could be retired and living elsewhere like Chattanooga, Portland, or some small dense city. If we keep up at the current pace, we may have to sell our place to avoid paying the increased property taxes.

 

Increased property taxes could seriously be an issue. I could see us going to a small city on the East or West coast. 

 

I'm betting you'd relocate to Portland, TN than Portland, OR. The costs in the latter are exorbitant.

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