Sign in to follow this  
dan326

Northern EBR Parish Development

Recommended Posts

I found a bit of info on the unnamed Central tnd. It seems it'll be called The Grove @ Bayou Landing and Bayou Landing Estates.

There wasn't much info : "

Large retail and shopping center located on Wax Road in the City of Central. Will host a movie theatre, restraunts, shopping, dining, medical, health and fitness plex, and much much more"

http://www.jbscompanies.com/Development.php

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Baton Rouge councilman wants proposed economic opportunity zone to include entire northern part of parish                

As the local and state officials meet to draw boundaries on the proposed Economic Opportunity Zone for north Baton Rouge and settle on which areas will be included and excluded, one Metro Councilman says he still wants the designation extended to the entire northern part of the parish to help communities like Brownsfield and Alsen.

Trae Welch, who represents District 1 including Zachary and parts of Baker, Central, Alsen and Chaneyville, also wants to see the zone tailored to draw specific businesses—not a blanket economic district, but one that will attract grocery stores, clinics and physician’s offices and new types of companies.

“It’s development without any direction. That can be, in some instances, as bad as no development at all, and I’m worried about that if we don’t be more specific as to what’s being asked in that economic development.” Welch says. “I don’t want to see more convenience stores passing themselves off as grocery stores, because they’re not.”

What Welch is proposing would be similar to when the council created tax incremental financing districts for hotels downtown, or when the Downtown Development District reworked its Enterprise Zone for Matherne’s Supermarket—a way to financially incentivize business-specific development for areas in need of certain services.

The council will revisit the issue of the Economic Opportunity Zone in about two weeks after having deferred the item at the last council meeting. Welch said at the time that he would like to see the boundaries extended to the entire northern part of the parish, and confirms in an interview this week with Daily Report that he is still pushing for it.

Welch says configuring the zone to allow for fresh fruit or vegetable markets in Alsen or for small clinics that would increase access to health care in some of the small communities would have a significant impact in the northern part of East Baton Rouge Parish. Those communities, Welch says, have some of the same hardships as north Baton Rouge.

He proposes either expanding the zone all at once or in stages.

The EOZ, first proposed by councilman and mayoral candidate John Delgado, would offer property tax abatements for 10 years to business owners and developers who build within the region. The boundaries encompass most of the city limits north of Florida Boulevard, but the deferral was made so council members could meet with some of their state counterparts to discuss the proposed confines of the zone.    https://www.businessreport.com/article/baton-rouge-councilman-wants-proposed-economic-opportunity-zone-include-entire-northern-part-parish

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I admire the stated goals but I really think the strategy here is not optimal.    I can't help but think these boundaries are rooted in political motivatations when they need to be based on a pragmatic vision.   

The building and housing stock are not the same animal as what existed downtown 20 years ago. There are different needs here and much bigger challenges, more environmental issues, and a serious economic head wind given the state's declining energy industry.  

I think there should be a focus on smaller areas identified as anchors to corridor development.   For example.....2016-2025, focus on the book ends to Plank (Fuqua/ N 22/Scenic area and the Hooper/Plank area).   2018-2025, focus on the Plank corridor itself     Only after success there, start expand the distinct and branch out.  

I'd to see the city/parish buy the vacant land around N. 22 and Fuqua  and clean up/remediate any hazardous waste prior to focusing on that area for future office space  needed by parish/city entities (credit unions, legal, sanitation, etc.) much the way that the state's DOTD is based in the area.  That would be a good southern anchor to this redevelopment effort.   

I also think the focus should be as much about jobs for the local population as it is on neighborhood amenities. North BR was originally a blue collar neighborhood supported by manufacturing and energy related jobs that are harder to find these days.   The most rapid recovery would depend on technical training and jobs for the 21st century economy. 

Edited by cajun
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Delgado wants list of incentives available to attract hospital to north Baton Rouge          

Metro Councilman John Delgado is asking the East Baton Rouge Parish Attorney’s Office to study the types of financial incentives available to lure a hospital to north Baton Rouge to fill the void left by the closures of Earl K. Long and Baton Rouge General’s Mid City emergency room.

Delgado says the property tax abatements available in his proposed Economic Opportunity Zone would be useless in this case because hospitals do not pay property taxes.

So what else is available? Well, that’s what Delgado, who announced in January that he is running for mayor, wants to know.

“As a lawyer, I typically know the answer to the question before I ask, but this time I don’t,” he says.

Delgado wants to see if any federal or state grant money is available or if a tax increment financing district would apply to a hospital. He also suggested using the extra millions the city-parish pays annually for mental health and medical care for East Baton Rouge Parish Prison inmates since Earl K. Long’s closure to subsidize a north Baton Rouge hospital.

Earl K. Long closed in spring 2013, and Baton Rouge General shuttered the emergency room at its Mid City campus last March. Community care and urgent care clinics have begun sprouting up to try to fill the healthcare void those areas.

Delgado says he began pondering the issue while recently discussing the proposed Baton Rouge Health District. The Metro Council will vote on Feb. 17 whether to amend the Urban Design and Neighborhoods Element of the city-parish Comprehensive Plan to adopt the master plan for the district.

Delgado says he fully supports the district, but it raises the question of what can be done to alleviate the need for a hospital in north Baton Rouge and what the council can do to address the need.    https://www.businessreport.com/article/delgado-wants-list-incentives-available-attract-hospital-north-baton-rouge

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not sure if a hospital is viable in North Baton Rouge, but if they get it worked out, I'd recommend something around N. 22/Plank/I-110 area.   Not sure where they could possibly fit it.....but that has easy access to pretty much everything, and ambulance routes east, west, north, and south are abundant.   It can be made fairly safe even right now with police presence.  North 22, Scenic, and 19th have interstate access too.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Antrell Williams said:

I think the old Sam's on Airline would be an adequate location, or Plank Rd at Airline. Along with a rebuilt Plank Rd, might be a good start for north BR as far as investment goes.

Yeah, there's a cross street at Choctaw there as well if they can get an overpass installed on airline over those tracks.  I suppose the old Belmont site would also work.   Honestly anywhere along Choctaw or Greenwell closer to Ailrine or Plank would be a great spot. 

I read somewhere that hospitals try to avoid close proximity to rail roads due to the difficulty in evacuating patients if there were a derailment.....but that doesn't seem to stop them from being constructed pretty close to major lines.

I honestly hoped anchor developments like this would be closer to Plank (North Baton Rouge's main street), with ancillary stuff like equipment rentals, clinics, fuel stations, distribution centers, and car dealers going on Airline....which I'm hoping will become a more efficient mover of traffic and less of a neighborhood thruway.  

I'm hearing that LSU may setup an Oseopathic medical school branch of their Allopathic New Orleans medical school in Baton Rouge.   I'm sure they'd be interested in having their students doing rotations in a north Baton Rouge ER although they'd probably prefer a "one stop shop"....with one big hospital drawing patients from all over the region.

That kind of begs the philosophical question of what purpose this hospital would serve with a giant like OLOL located in Baton Rouge.    Would this new hospital triage the serious patients until they get to OLOL?  Focus on minor illnesses?....probably doesn't need an actual emergency room if that's the case.   While it would be nice if OLOL were downtown or mid city, it's not as if it's in Egypt.  On one hand, I think a real trauma center closer to the city center would be nice, I think it's destined to fail without a real partnership with a medical school as a training facility - with all the government grants that comes with.

Edited by cajun

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BRAC, LED still hopeful Belgium company will follow through on planned $150M facility in north Baton Rouge       

The 127-acre site in north Baton Rouge that Katoen Natie USA purchased with plans for $150 million plastics storage, custom packaging and distribution facility announced in 2013 still sits idle. The company is in a holding pattern on whether to move forward with the project, but local and state officials are optimistic the facility—and the 850 jobs it was expected to create—will come to fruition.

Michaël Deroose, facility manager in Port Allen for the Belgium-based company, says the company is evaluating the market conditions and will make a final decision on whether to move forward with the project in April. Deroose says they are closely watching oil prices, since the plastics industry follows the oil industry.

Baton Rouge Area Chamber President and CEO Adam Knapp says Katoen Natie has told him they want to move forward with the project, but are waiting to see if the demand along the Gulf Coast is strong enough to justify the investment.

Knapp says he there are some times when he can tell a project is dead even as the company stresses it will move forward, but he gets the sense that Katoen Natie wants to move forward.

“We would take it off if we thought it was dead,” Knapp says, referring to the list of companies who have announced projects in the Baton Rouge area. “They continue to show their intent to move forward.”

Louisiana Economic Development officials say they also believe the company will move forward with the project. Katoen Natie has already completed engineering and sales studies for the site.

In March 2013, Katoen Natie and Louisiana officials announced the $150 million project and touted 210 new direct jobs, 561 indirect jobs and 150 construction jobs slated to be created by the project. The company had said it hoped to complete the first phase of construction by the end of 2013 and had expected to complete the entire facility by 2018.

LED says the incentives are still on the table because they would only be realized upon completion of the facility and hiring of workers. There were no performance-based cash incentives in advance of the project.

The company received a financial incentives package from the LED, which includes Louisiana’s Quality Jobs and Industrial Tax Exemption incentives, as well as the LED FastStart workforce development program.

The facility, envisioned to measure about 2 million square feet, is to be built just off Scenic Highway in north Baton Rouge near the Republic Services’ facility at 12451 Leisure Road. Knapp says the company still owns the land.

Katoen Natie is a worldwide shipping and logistics company with facilities and offices in 28 countries on five continents. The company’s U.S. operations are based out of Houston. Katoen Natie specializes in chemical, industrial and automotive shipping.

The company has a 150,000-square-foot warehouse in Port Allen that packages plastic pellets for the petrochemical industry. The international company also has facilities in California, New Jersey, Indiana and Virginia, as well as Canada, Mexico, Africa, South America and the Far East, according to the Katoen Natie’s website.     https://www.businessreport.com/article/brac-led-still-hopeful-belgium-company-will-follow-planned-150m-facility-north-baton-rouge

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not overly excited about a Distribution Center, but everything helps.  $150 million is a huge investment, and we can use the jobs.

I'd prefer more direct value-added projects like manufacturing.

Edited by cajun
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/10/2016 at 8:53 AM, cajun said:

Yeah, there's a cross street at Choctaw there as well if they can get an overpass installed on airline over those tracks.  I suppose the old Belmont site would also work.   Honestly anywhere along Choctaw or Greenwell closer to Ailrine or Plank would be a great spot. 

I read somewhere that hospitals try to avoid close proximity to rail roads due to the difficulty in evacuating patients if there were a derailment.....but that doesn't seem to stop them from being constructed pretty close to major lines.

I honestly hoped anchor developments like this would be closer to Plank (North Baton Rouge's main street), with ancillary stuff like equipment rentals, clinics, fuel stations, distribution centers, and car dealers going on Airline....which I'm hoping will become a more efficient mover of traffic and less of a neighborhood thruway.  

I'm hearing that LSU may setup an Oseopathic medical school branch of their Allopathic New Orleans medical school in Baton Rouge.   I'm sure they'd be interested in having their students doing rotations in a north Baton Rouge ER although they'd probably prefer a "one stop shop"....with one big hospital drawing patients from all over the region.

That kind of begs the philosophical question of what purpose this hospital would serve with a giant like OLOL located in Baton Rouge.    Would this new hospital triage the serious patients until they get to OLOL?  Focus on minor illnesses?....probably doesn't need an actual emergency room if that's the case.   While it would be nice if OLOL were downtown or mid city, it's not as if it's in Egypt.  On one hand, I think a real trauma center closer to the city center would be nice, I think it's destined to fail without a real partnership with a medical school as a training facility - with all the government grants that comes with.

I was thinking about the Belmont site too. 

A great site could be along Howell Blvd with a tie-in with the park (which I thought was Expressway Park but Google Maps has it named Parkway Park). I haven't been down there in a while, but I believe there's still a good amount of land on either side of the street. Very quick access to I-110, Airline, and Plank. A potential partnership with Southern could keep LSU at the Health District. 

Lane Regional seems to be a similar size to St. Elizabeth and both OLOL and BRG are only 16 miles away. Seems like this hospital could serve a purpose to me. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Economic development can occur in north Baton Rouge, officials say    

Longing for the robust economic investment and growth, north Baton Rouge residents reiterated their desire for more businesses, better jobs and economic opportunities in their community during a Town Hall meeting held Thursday evening.

A standing room only crowd packed into the second floor room at The Offices at Champion Medical Center on Howell Place Boulevard, not far from the Baton Rouge Metro Airport.

They were there to hear and pose questions to a panel of community, government and business leaders who discussed contentious issues such as the possible relocation of the BREC Baton Rouge Zoo and the lack of trauma care access in north Baton Rouge. Gary Chambers moderated the discussion among the panel, which included representatives from the Baton Rouge Area Chamber, airport, zoo and others.

Much of the discussion centered around economic development and how to uplift the area economically to close income disparities in the city-parish.

State Sen. Regina Barrow said she has long been told businesses would not move into north Baton Rouge community because of crime. But she challenged that notion, saying the creation of economic opportunities would bring more development.

“What comes first, the chicken or the egg?,” Barrow asked. “The reason we may have higher crime in our community is because there are no opportunities in our community.”

Barrow added: “Everything that exist on the southside of town, we want it on the north side of the town. I don’t like the fact that I have to drive five or 10 miles to go to a grocery store in my community.”

In some instances, people in the north Baton Rouge don’t have access to bus lines that will take them a grocery store. Transportation, education and economic development are all tied together, she said, adding there are resources in north Baton Rouge to aid economic development.

She and others on the panel said small strives have been in north Baton Rouge, but they stressed more needs to be done. BRAC President and CEO Adam Knapp agreed.

“The community doesn’t have to wait,” he said.

While investment is occurring across communities, there are strategies to improve neighborhoods and make sure businesses investment is available, Knapp said. Still, he emphasized the need for stakeholders to unite around a common strategy to attract investment and utilize existing economic assets.

“You can go after it today even while going after targeted improvements like grocery stores,” he said.    https://www.businessreport.com/article/economic-development-can-occur-north-baton-rouge-officials-say

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New owner of Plank Plaza Shopping Center mulling over ideas for vacant spaces       

The new owner of the Plank Plaza Shopping Center says he will first fix the parking lot, then decide what do with the vacant 22,000-square-foot space Piggly Wiggly vacated a few months ago.

Robert Dupré, under Boullé Enterprises LLC, paid $700,000 to Plaza Holdings LLC, represented by local artist Phyllis Sandra, in a sale that closed Thursday.

The Plaza occupies an area between 8150 and 8190 Plank Road, north of Harding Boulevard and Hooper Road and on the southeast corner of the Baton Rouge Metro Airport.

Dupré also owns Hooked Up Seafood at 8194 Plank Road, in an outparcel on the property. He says his first priority is the parking lot, which is in dire need of repairs.

Dupré says he is mulling over other improvement ideas for the plaza after fixing the parking lot, but nothing has been finalized.

The biggest hole is the old Piggly Wiggly spot. Dupré says he may go after a supermarket to anchor the center, or he may convert the space to another use.

“I’m kicking some ideas around. I think a flea market would be nice right there or an event center in the Piggly Wiggly,” Dupré says. Either idea would be relatively easy and inexpensive to do, he adds.

He says a nurse practitioner has reached out to him about opening a small clinic in one of the open spaces, and the owner of Club Bella Noche has expressed interest in opening a small furniture rental store in a vacant space next to the club.   https://www.businessreport.com/article/new-owner-plank-plaza-shopping-center-mulling-ideas-vacant-spaces

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Political attention turns to north Baton Rouge; focus is on lack of economic development, investment    

East Baton Rouge Parish Metro Councilwoman Tara Wicker calls Florida Boulevard the “Mason-Dixon line” of the parish . The mother of five, who has lived near that borderline her entire life and represents much of north Baton Rouge on the council, said she hopes she lives to see the day when somebody can cross over Florida and not even realize it because the two regions won’t look so starkly dissimilar.

That’s not the case today.

North of Florida Boulevard, in the city limits of Baton Rouge, business openings lag dramatically behind the rest of the parish. A hospital and an emergency room have closed. Cortana Mall is half-empty. Residential neighborhoods are mostly lined with steep ditches instead of sidewalks.

On the south side of the parish, downtown is in the midst of a Renaissance, with new restaurants and businesses being announced by the week. Hospitals are thriving, with a new children’s hospital breaking ground near an already booming medical area. Luxury movie theaters are popping up, and the Mall of Louisiana continues to attract popular retail chains on the sprawling campus.

q4yn7QT.jpghttp://theadvocate.com/news/14677697-172/political-attention-turns-to-north-baton-rouge-focus-is-on-lack-of-economic-development-investment-i

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, greg225 said:

Political attention turns to north Baton Rouge; focus is on lack of economic development, investment    

East Baton Rouge Parish Metro Councilwoman Tara Wicker calls Florida Boulevard the “Mason-Dixon line” of the parish . The mother of five, who has lived near that borderline her entire life and represents much of north Baton Rouge on the council, said she hopes she lives to see the day when somebody can cross over Florida and not even realize it because the two regions won’t look so starkly dissimilar.

That’s not the case today.

North of Florida Boulevard, in the city limits of Baton Rouge, business openings lag dramatically behind the rest of the parish. A hospital and an emergency room have closed. Cortana Mall is half-empty. Residential neighborhoods are mostly lined with steep ditches instead of sidewalks.

On the south side of the parish, downtown is in the midst of a Renaissance, with new restaurants and businesses being announced by the week. Hospitals are thriving, with a new children’s hospital breaking ground near an already booming medical area. Luxury movie theaters are popping up, and the Mall of Louisiana continues to attract popular retail chains on the sprawling campus.

 

She's overestimating the economic health of south Baton Rouge amid $30/bbl oil prices and underestimating the existing and exploitable resources that north Baton Rouge's private sector can use to their advantage.  

Things can certainly be better there, but it's not helpless.   North Baton Rouge is home to one of the oldest and most prosperous AG grocery stores, 3 Piggly Wiggly's, A Sams Club, Wal Mart Super Center, the airport, the largest private employer in the region, and easily the best seafood market in the region (arguably the entire state). 

Baton Rouge needs to fight crime in areas like Mall City (not to mention Tigerland) and eliminate blighted apartment complexes, come up with an overlay plan for Plank road, Airline, Scenic, Choctaw, etc., and narrow their economic development focus to smaller areas.  

Edited by cajun
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

17 hours ago, cajun said:

She's overestimating the economic health of south Baton Rouge amid $30/bbl oil prices and underestimating the existing and exploitable resources that north Baton Rouge's private sector can use to their advantage.  

Things can certainly be better there, but it's not helpless.   North Baton Rouge is home to one of the oldest and most prosperous AG grocery stores, 3 Piggly Wiggly's, A Sams Club, Wal Mart Super Center, the airport, the largest private employer in the region, and easily the best seafood market in the region (arguably the entire state). 

Baton Rouge needs to fight crime in areas like Mall City (not to mention Tigerland) and eliminate blighted apartment complexes, come up with an overlay plan for Plank road, Airline, Scenic, Choctaw, etc., and narrow their economic development focus to smaller areas.  

Completely on point. 

 

I feel like many of the NBR politcians just want to see money in the area similar to SBR, but fail to see that most of the development has been by private enterprise and not public money. That kind of money is not going to come to NBR if it continues to have the identity as crime ridden. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/29/2016 at 10:10 AM, mr. bernham said:

Completely on point. 

 

I feel like many of the NBR politcians just want to see money in the area similar to SBR, but fail to see that most of the development has been by private enterprise and not public money. That kind of money is not going to come to NBR if it continues to have the identity as crime ridden. 

  Private enterprise, but it was not that long ago when most southern part of the parish was undeveloped. Its the Mayor-President job to attract business to this parish private or public most of that been going to the south. Crime could be hitting that area harder because of the neglect from the parish, so its not the parish job to deal with blight property and crime? Everybody that live in NBR don't commit crimes most are good people, this is not almost 300 murders a year New Orleans this NBR. The RDA could do a lot of good work in NBR, but guess who is blocking the financing the Mayor. NBR speaking up, so the new governor can hear them and the next EBR mayor-president hear them.

Edited by greg225

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Quote

https://www.businessreport.com/politics/rolfe-mccollister-north-baton-rouge

 

My dad grew up in north Baton Rouge and graduated from Istrouma High School. He opened businesses in north Baton Rouge on Plank Road. I remember playing golf at Howell Park, donuts at Krispy Kreme and the first McDonald’s on Plank Road.

You can still get those delicious donuts—I took my grandson last year—but much of north Baton Rouge is different now. For that matter, much of Broadmoor and Sherwood Forest where I grew up is different, too.

Shucks, all of Baton Rouge has changed over the last 20 years. That’s the way cities evolve, and you deal with the changing demographics and market trends—and consumer choices—not to mention the money in circulation and profits generated. Decisions by businesses, consumers or government have to be sustainable.

You can’t buy an expensive home or car just because you “want one.” You may be able to pay the first payment or first year, but can you continue year after year?

So when I heard of a town hall meeting in NBR where state Sen. Regina Barrow made the comment, “Everything that exists on the south side of town, we want it on the north side of town,” I had to wonder, “What reality is she living in?”

Is she expecting a Mall of Louisiana at Plank Road and Airline Highway? (There was a power center called North Park with a movie theater. Gone. A warehouse now.) Does she want a Crowne Plaza with a conference center at Winbourne Avenue and Airline? (There was the Belle-mont Motor Hotel and The Great Hall. Gone.) Oh, and does she wants a specialty hospital on Harding Boulevard? (They had the high-quality Greater Baton Rouge Surgical Hospital, a 10-bed facility in Howell Place Business Park. Gone. Mostly owned by minority physicians, it lost $7 million over its last four years due to patient volume.) These businesses all wanted to stay open but couldn’t due to economics. Not an issue of black or white—but green.

Barrow says the problem in NBR is one of “chicken-or-the-egg,” linked to crime rates. She says businesses don’t want to come because of crime rates, but thinks economic development could turn those rates around. Unfortunately, the crime issue and economic issue are caused by the poor education and dropout issue. These also affect the unemployment and income levels, which are a major factor in the market for goods and services.

Even if there was no crime, if there are no profits, a business is not interested. That’s the reality that seemed missing from the town hall meeting. There is no “Santa” who hands out grocery stores or hospitals.

Maybe Barrow and others just wanted to criticize elected officials and foundations (who do much for NBR), and are expecting them to pick up the tab for their “wish list.” Instead, why don’t these leaders really lead and not simply point fingers, play the race card and claim victimhood in an effort to manipulate and try to shame someone into helping?

Many of the challenges existing in NBR can be laid at the feet of those leaders and their consituents and they have to take responsibility for solving. An Economic Opportunity Zone may be a step forward, but is certainly only one of many that have been long overdue. It starts at home—not at some town hall gripe session. If you really want solutions —get real.

Can't help but think that the failure of the central nodes like Florida Blvd or Government Street within Baton Rouge over the years is partially responsible for this bickering. 

We all want North Baton Rouge to improve....but why aren't some of these amenities on Florida Blvd in the center part of the parish anyways?   That used to be Baton Rouge's main street.   There used to be a department store downtown, hotels, restaurants, and malls all along Florida.    Now Baton Rouge's main street is I-10.

Despite all this focus on downtown and mid city, Florida Blvd actually has a lot of decay from one end of the parish to the other.

Edited by cajun

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, cajun said:

 

Can't help but think that the failure of the central nodes like Florida Blvd or Government Street within Baton Rouge over the years is partially responsible for this bickering. 

We all want North Baton Rouge to improve....but why aren't some of these amenities on Florida Blvd in the center part of the parish anyways?   That used to be Baton Rouge's main street.   There used to be a department store downtown, hotels, restaurants, and malls all along Florida.    Now Baton Rouge's main street is I-10.

Despite all this focus on downtown and mid city, Florida Blvd actually has a lot of decay from one end of the parish to the other.

Still is a mall on Florida Blvd that probably have to be rebuild to something more urban because that's the trend in Baton Rouge. Florida have the same problem as NBR its due to neglect if this parish, had a better plan to deal with blight property this would be easy to change.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, cajun said:

https://www.businessreport.com/politics/rolfe-mccollister-north-baton-rouge

 

 

Barrow says the problem in NBR is one of “chicken-or-the-egg,” linked to crime rates. She says businesses don’t want to come because of crime rates, but thinks economic development could turn those rates around. Unfortunately, the crime issue and economic issue are caused by the poor education and dropout issue. These also affect the unemployment and income levels, which are a major factor in the market for goods and services.

Even if there was no crime, if there are no profits, a business is not interested. That’s the reality that seemed missing from the town hall meeting. There is no “Santa” who hands out grocery stores or hospitals.

Maybe Barrow and others just wanted to criticize elected officials and foundations (who do much for NBR), and are expecting them to pick up the tab for their “wish list.” Instead, why don’t these leaders really lead and not simply point fingers, play the race card and claim victimhood in an effort to manipulate and try to shame someone into helping?

Many of the challenges existing in NBR can be laid at the feet of those leaders and their consituents and they have to take responsibility for solving. An Economic Opportunity Zone may be a step forward, but is certainly only one of many that have been long overdue. It starts at home—not at some town hall gripe session. If you really want solutions —get real.

BRAF never done nothing for NBR they have every right to criticize elected officials and BRAF.  What have BRAF done for NBR? Most of the plans they have is selective in EBR, but in the parish budget they receive 500,000 a year. If want to receive tax payers money then you open your self up to a lot of question. I never heard of NBR pulling the race card, but I knew that's what they would say to try shut them up. You can't be selective and take tax payers dollars and then say they have no right to be mad. Mayor keep saying Baton Rouge want to be America's Next Great City I guess only selective parts of the city. Just because area of the city is down don't mean you treat the people of that area like they don't matter. Baton Rouge could have easy had a plan years ago to invested some of the plant on infrastructure and dealing with blight, but that money is spent elsewhere in the parish not NBR. You can be polluted by the plants, but not see dime of the money invested in your community. New Orleans Crime triple Baton Rouge crime rate, but some way how they find ways to get business in those poor neighborhoods.

Edited by greg225

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

North Baton Rouge task force group seeks $100,000 from Metro Council            

A task force being created to come up with solutions for north Baton Rouge’s lack of economic development and healthcare will request $100,000 from the city-parish for their work.

 

Metro Councilwoman Chauna Banks-Daniel said Wednesday that the task force, called #NBRNOW Blue Ribbon Commission is not meant to be governmental and should have no authority on its own. She said its role will be to provide research and recommendations to the Metro Council and other decision makers.

 

Banks-Daniel said the specifics of how the money will be used will be up to the people on the commission, and that no decisions have been made yet about how the money would be allocated. She said no other entity is studying north Baton Rouge in the way the commission will, which shows the necessity of securing funding.

“We believe this request will speak volumes to taxpaying residents in and around north Baton Rouge that sit on the sidelines for decades, watching our Metro Council offer generous incentives and build expensive infrastructure in other parts of the parish,” said the commission’s cochairman and TheRougeCollection.net publisher Gary Chambers.

But some Metro Council members say they are not inclined to approve $100,000 for the task force without a clear explanation of how they would spend the money. Some said they would be more amenable to approving the money if it were going toward a research firm studying north Baton Rouge as opposed to a group of volunteer citizens.

The studies of north Baton Rouge should take around six months, with a finish line goal in August of 2016, according to Southern professor and commission member Cheria Lane-Mackey.

The other members of the task force are:

 

Co-Chair Leslie Grover, a professor at Southern University

Dezmion Barrow, who has recently addressed the Metro Council about north Baton Rouge issues multiple times

Cleve Dunn, who is part of the city-parish’s body cameras committee

Tiffany Franklin, who works for the Southern University Ag Center

Eric Horent, an economist at Southern

 

Joyce Plummer, an attorney who has run for public office

Lue Russell, a state organizer

“They’re putting the cart way before the horse,” said Metro Councilman Trae Welch, when asked about the monetary request. “...What is $100,000 supposed to do? I suggest they get with the administration and work with the resources we have through a myriad of people who that is their job.”

Councilman Joel Boé said the city-parish already allocates money to the Baton Rouge Area Chamber to promote economic development across East Baton Rouge. He said he can understand the need to study healthcare in north Baton Rouge, but that he’s not sure what new information could come out of studying economic development.

“I would want to know some more specifics about what they intend to use their money for, what’s the analysis and end result,” Boé said. “How is that different from what the Baton Rouge Area Chamber can offer?’’

 

Councilmen John Delgado and Buddy Amoroso also said current details about the commission are too vague to know for sure whether they could support giving them money.

Delgado said he agrees that north Baton Rouge needs to incentives to lure business there, but he said studying economic development in north Baton Rouge might be best left to consultants.

“These types of citizen committees are not designed to conduct economic development studies,” Delgado said.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Central subdivision Twin Lake Estates growing fast, providing opportunity for independent builders         

Developer Jim Clark has begun construction on the third phase of his 60-acre Central subdivision, Twin Lakes Estates. The development is less than three years old, but already the 49-lot first phase is sold out and so have all but three of the 34 lots in phase two.

Clarke says demand for new construction in that area is in the $300,000 to $400,000 price range. “We haven’t even had time to advertise,” he says.

So far only infrastructure work is underway on the 35-lot third phase of Twin Lakes Estates, which is located on Denham Road near Greenwell Springs Road. But Clark has contracted with several independent builders, who will begin home construction later this spring. Those same builders—Dwayne Gafford, Casey Patterson, Justin Jackson, Don Biggs and Pete Pocorella—developed the homes in the first two phases. Clark says in a market that is increasingly competitive for independent builders he is happy to sell them lots.

“The independent builders are being squeezed out by DR Horton, Level and DSLD, and they can’t get any lots,” he says. “I’ve been a builder my whole life, and I know how hard it is to get good lots at a good price.”

The average lot size in Twin Lakes Estates is 80 feet by 145 feet, and they have been priced around $60,000. Homes are priced between $320,000 and $380,000. The subdivision has 12 acres of green space and a lake fully stocked with bass and sac-au-lait.

“It’s a nice development and a really strong market,” he says. “We’re only two or three minutes from that brand new middle school, and we’re convenient to the high school … so this area is very strong.”   https://www.businessreport.com/article/central-subdivision-twin-lake-estates-growing-fast-providing-opportunity-independent-builders

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Metro Council expected to hear report on incentives for north Baton Rouge hospital today    

The Metro Council at its meeting today will hear a report from the Parish Attorney’s Office on the list of incentives available to the city-parish to help recruit a hospital to north Baton Rouge.

The council formally asked the Parish Attorney’s Office about incentives on Feb. 25, but Councilman John Delgado placed the item on the council’s radar on Feb. 4.

Since then, the fervor over the lack of a north Baton Rouge hospital—and a push to secure one—has intensified, to the point of forcing the Baton Rouge Area Foundation to remove an item formally creating a Health District in south Baton Rouge from the Metro Council Zoning Committee’s agenda. The committee deferred the item in mid-February amid strong pushback from the north Baton Rouge community.

Delgado has said the property tax abatements in his proposed Economic Opportunity Zone would not apply to a hospital because those facilities do not pay property taxes. He wants to know whether other tax incentives, state or federal grant programs exist that might encourage a health care provider to bring a hospital to north Baton Rouge.

North Baton Rouge residents have not had access to emergency medical care in their area since Earl K. Long Regional Medical Center closed in spring 2013 and Baton Rouge General Medical Center shuttered its Mid City campus’ emergency room last March.

Some residents banded together in February to oppose the creation of the Health District in south Baton Rouge, questioning why improvements should be focused there instead of north Baton Rouge.

Several people and organizations now are currently working on plans to bring an emergency care facility to north Baton Rouge.

Also on the council’s agenda is an item authorizing Mayor Kip Holden to rename a multipurpose room in the Charles R. Kelly Community Center in honor of former Metro Councilwoman and state Rep. Ronnie Edwards. Edwards died Feb. 24 after a lengthy battle with late-stage pancreatic cancer.

The council also will introduce items to amend the city-parish code of ordinances to impose a 10-day deadline to approve or reject a building permit, and to give final approval for the East Baton Rouge Redevelopment Authority to rezone the old Entergy site on Government Street for a mixed-use commercial development.

Those items will come up for public hearing and possible vote on March 23.

The council will convene at 4 p.m. Wednesday at City Hall, 222 St. Louis St. See the full agenda.  https://www.businessreport.com/article/metro-council-expected-hear-report-incentives-north-baton-rouge-hospital-today

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/2/2016 at 10:35 AM, greg225 said:

Still is a mall on Florida Blvd that probably have to be rebuild to something more urban because that's the trend in Baton Rouge. Florida have the same problem as NBR its due to neglect if this parish, had a better plan to deal with blight property this would be easy to change.

I-10 and I-12 paralleling Florida so close hurt it.   It's been route "sixty sixed" slowly over time. 

I think getting Airline moving again would go a long way to helping bring more traffic into the Florida corridor around Airline. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.