TBurban

Dominion Resources: New High-rise Building Planned for Downtown

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47 minutes ago, drayrichmond said:

I've just realized we put this all in the wrong thread, anybody know how to/have the ability to move this stuff to the arena thread?

 

That's a good question on the bond rating and how this may effect it. Let hope the Chicago firm does a good thorough job and the numbers add up. 

Oops, I guess that is my fault...but this thread sort of fits because the financials have to do with the Dominion Energy property...well, at least a portion does.  Sorry guys. 

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4 minutes ago, RVAbigdawg said:

20th floor of the new building just got covered up with windows.  Looks like all that's left is to glass up the crown.  Looking good!

Is the crown going to have any special lighting effects?

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2 hours ago, ZUMAN2 said:

Is the crown going to have any special lighting effects?

It has lighting (not sure of what level of effects) on the crown, so I assume there will be some good lighting effects.

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1 hour ago, Richmonopoly said:

You can see the crown pretty well coming from the East on 64W into downtown!  

It’s not true unless you post pictures!  :rofl:

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One way I have seen structures this tall imploded, is to drop it into a hole by using delayed charges.  It is indeed a lengthy clean up job.  Permit and approval process for this method could be an adventure on it's own.

Another yet more efficient way I have seen towers this size and taller demolished is via floor-by-floor removal.  Tower crane would assist in this process.

Edited by Shakman

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I would think using the tower crane method to demo the building would be better, that's how the General Assembly building was taken down without too much of a mess sprawling out all over Broad Street.

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48 minutes ago, RVAbigdawg said:

I would think using the tower crane method to demo the building would be better, that's how the General Assembly building was taken down without too much of a mess sprawling out all over Broad Street.

I've been told that anything over 15 stories generally requires implosion.  

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2 hours ago, jbjust said:

I've been told that anything over 15 stories generally requires implosion.  

The former One Meridian Plaza in Philadelphia used a tower crane when it was demo'ed.  The tower was 38-floors; 492 ft.  There was also a +20-floor tower in Houston, TX which used a tower crane during demolition; current location of 609 Main at Texas.

 

3 hours ago, RVAbigdawg said:

I would think using the tower crane method to demo the building would be better, that's how the General Assembly building was taken down without too much of a mess sprawling out all over Broad Street.

A crawler crane with a wrecking ball was used on the older structure.  The structural steel portion used two demo claws.  

 

Implosions are fun to watch but there many aspects that need to be factored when determining the best method of demolition.  The logistics and possible insurance claims can be quite a costly issue if implosions in an urban area have any failure.

Edited by Shakman

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On 7/20/2018 at 1:59 PM, Shakman said:

The former One Meridian Plaza in Philadelphia used a tower crane when it was demo'ed.  The tower was 38-floors; 492 ft.  There was also a +20-floor tower in Houston, TX which used a tower crane during demolition; current location of 609 Main at Texas.

 

A crawler crane with a wrecking ball was used on the older structure.  The structural steel portion used two demo claws.  

 

Implosions are fun to watch but there many aspects that need to be factored when determining the best method of demolition.  The logistics and possible insurance claims can be quite a costly issue if implosions in an urban area have any failure.

Well, aren't you just a know-it-all?

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